Accessibility Menu

Frequently Asked Questions

Questions

  1. Are Library of Congress facilities accessible for people with disabilities?
  2. Which entrances to the Library of Congress are accessible?
  3. Are tours of the Library of Congress given for people with disabilities?
  4. Who should I contact for ADA accommodations other than interpreting?
  5. Does the Library of Congress provide assistive listening devices for deaf or hard of hearing visitors and researchers who wish to participate in events, tours, programs, or lectures?
  6. What accommodations are available for researchers with disabilities who want to use Library of Congress collections and facilities?
  7. How can I get information about the National Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped and their "talking books" service?
  8. Does the Library of Congress have accessible restrooms?
  9. Where can I find a TTY pay telephone in the Library of Congress?
  10. Are wheelchairs available for use in Library of Congress buildings?
  11. Are food services at the Library of Congress accessible?
  12. How can I get information about employment opportunities at the Library of Congress?
  13. How can I get to the Library of Congress on public transportation?
  14. If I drive to the Library of Congress, is there designated accessible parking?

Answers

  1. Are Library of Congress facilities accessible for people with disabilities?

    Yes, the Library of Congress, the nation's largest library, is accessible and open to the public. The Library has taken many steps to provide accommodations and universal design features to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

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  2. Which entrances to the Library of Congress are accessible?

    See this page for a list of accessible entrances.

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  3. Are tours of the Library of Congress given for people with disabilities?

    Yes. Please refer to the information and schedules at this page.

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  4. Who should I contact for ADA accommodations other than interpreting?

    Please contact the ADA coordinator by mail, phone or email: ADA Coordinator, LM 623, Library of Congress, Washington, DC 20540-2530, email ada@loc.gov, phone (202) 707-6362.

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  5. Does the Library of Congress provide assistive listening devices for deaf or hard of hearing visitors and researchers who wish to participate in events, tours, programs, or lectures?

    Yes. Please request Assistive Listening Devices in advance of a program by contacting (202) 707-6362 or ada@loc.gov.

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  6. What accommodations are available for researchers with disabilities who want to use Library of Congress collections and facilities?

    Many types accommodation equipment are available through the Library's Assistive Technology Demonstration Center. Please contact us in advance to determine a match between your research plans and your accessibility needs. For more information, go to this page.

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  7. How can I get information about the National Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped and their "talking books" service?

    The resources of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), which, in cooperation with a network of regional libraries, provides a free library service to persons who are unable to use standard printed material because of visual or physical disabilities, are available by contacting the NLS Reference Section at (202) 707-9275. The Reference Section will provide the telephone number of the nearest cooperating library and answer eligibility questions. For additional information, go to this site.

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  8. Does the Library of Congress have accessible restrooms?

    Yes. The Library has accessible rest rooms as indicated by signs in each building. In the Madison Building the accessible rest rooms are in the blue (Northwest) and yellow (Southeast) corridors of the building.

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  9. Where can I find a TTY pay telephone in the Library of Congress?

    In the James Madison Memorial Building, near the Independence Avenue entrance.

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  10. Are wheelchairs available for use in Library of Congress buildings?

    Wheelchairs are available from the Visitor Services Office in the Jefferson and Madison buildings.

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  11. Are food services at the Library of Congress accessible?

    The cafeteria, on the sixth floor of the Madison Building, is accessible and open to the public Monday through Friday from 9 to 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 to 3 p.m. An accessible coffee shop on the Ground Floor of the Madison Building is open to the public Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. and on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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  12. How can I get information about employment opportunities at the Library of Congress?

    The Library of Congress is an equal opportunity employer, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. The Employment Office number is (202) 707-5627 (voice) Please review the information about employment at the Library of Congress. Qualified applicants with targeted/severe disabilities may be eligible for special consideration. Please follow the job procedures listed on the vacancy announcement and submit. For further information contact (202) 707-6362 or ada@loc.gov.

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  13. How can I get to the Library of Congress on public transportation?

    Access via Metrorail is on the Blue or Orange lines, Capitol South station. All Metro stations have elevator service and trains are accessible. The Library's Madison Building has an accessible entrance near the Metro station on the Northeast corner at First and C Streets SE. Please note that this entrance is one block traveling up a hill from the Metro elevator; and that the accessible ramp is over 100 feet long). Another accessible entrance to the Madison building is on Independence Avenue between First and Second Streets, SE. It is two blocks from the Metro elevator (traveling uphill). For accessible bus transportation, please contact Metro .

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  14. If I drive to the Library of Congress, is there designated accessible parking?

    The Library's policy is that no parking is available to members of the public, including people with disabilities.

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