LC Cataloging Newsline

Online Newsletter of the Cataloging Directorate, Library of Congress

Volume 8, no. 6, ISSN 1066-8829, June 2000

Contents

MARC Cross-Field Validation Software
Discontinuation of "In Process" Record Distribution
Core-Level Music Cataloging
Decimal Classification Editorial Policy Committee
Music Library Association
Hirons Awarded Marcia Tuttle International Grant
Lubetzky Symposium Publication

MARC Cross-Field Validation Software

The Library of Congress has implemented a stand-alone application that performs MARC cross-field validation on bibliographic and name authority records. This software, Validator, is the result of collaboration between Gary Strawn (Authorities Librarian, Northwestern University) and David Williamson (Cataloging Automation Specialist, Cataloging Directorate, Library of Congress). Williamson took one of his existing Visual Basic programs that validates standard numbers (ISBN, ISMN, ISSN) and modified it to function with Strawn's software, providing the ability to check more than just standard numbers. The final product is a program installed on each cataloger's workstation that can be used to check many elements in a MARC record before passing the record on to the next processing stage.

In order for the program to work, there must be a MARC record displayed in the cataloging module of the Library's new integrated library system. The user clicks on the "Validate record" button (or alternatively invokes a macro that performs the same function). The program sends commands to the cataloging module that cause a temporary file to be created containing the MARC record from the screen. The file is read, the MARC elements are analyzed by the program, and the validations performed. The user is then presented with a window displaying the results. The process takes just a few seconds. If errors are found, the user can correct the record and then revalidate it.

Initially at LC, only a small number of error checks are being performed to allow staff to become accustomed to using this tool. Of particular importance are the spaces contained in the Library of Congress control number (LCCN) which have proven to be problematic. The new validation tool checks the structure of the LCCN and alerts the user to problems. New rules for more error checks will be added later.

The software is not tied to any one type of MARC editor. Strawn's software can be incorporated into any program that supports the use of ActiveX objects. With minor modifications, Validator can function with any system that can save a record on the screen to a file in MARC 21 format. Strawn's software is free for use for non-commercial purposes. For further information about Strawn's software, contact him directly at [email protected] For questions regarding Validator and its use at LC, contact David Williamson at [email protected].


Discontinuation of "In Process" Record Distribution

The Library of Congress discontinued distributing "in-process" records for books through the MARC Distribution Services (MDS) at the end of April 2000. As of this date current MDS subscribers for Books All, Books US, Books English, Books CJK, Books Arabic, and Books Hebrew stopped receiving in-process records, also known as "preliminary cataloging," "encoding level 5 records," or "initial bibliographic control records."

Although the number of in-process records distributed has diminished over the last several years, the primary reason for discontinuing their distribution is workflow adjustments in the Library's processing operations. However, the Library will continue to distribute in-process records prepared in its overseas offices (field 042=lcode).

As a means of responding to those needing access to the Library's in-process records after April 2000, access remains available to most in-process records through the Library's OPAC.


Core-Level Music Cataloging

On March 1, 2000, Music and Sound Recordings Teams I and II of the Special Materials Cataloging Division implemented a proposal to catalog as core-level all items that had formerly been cataloged as production-level cataloging (PLC). PLC was an enhanced version of minimal-level cataloging that provided better subject access and included some fields that were deemed useful or necessary for music and sound recordings cataloging records. An analysis of core-level versus PLC guidelines showed that there are very few differences between the two. Catalogers need no longer spend time deciding whether to catalog an item as PLC or core-level, and the switch to core-level cataloging has required little additional name authority work.


Decimal Classification Editorial Policy Committee

The Decimal Classification Editorial Policy Committee (EPC) held its Meeting 114 at the Library of Congress, May 3-5. Andrea Stamm (Northwestern University) assumed her role as EPC chair; Anne Robertson (State Library of Queensland) attended her first meeting as Australia's representative; and Isabella Kubosch (National Library of Norway) attended as a guest to inform the committee on progress of the Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC) Edition 21 Norwegian translation, of which she is the editor. Jolande Goldberg (law specialist in the Cataloging Policy and Support Office) participated in the committee's discussion of the law exhibits on which she had given advice to the Dewey editorial staff.

The committee considered and approved editorial exhibits for DDC Edition 22 (to be published in 2003) on selected changes in Table 1 Standard subdivisions; Table 5 Racial, ethnic, national groups; Table 6 Languages; 004-006 Computer science (approved for review by outside parties); 305-306 Social groups (also approved for outside review); 320 Political science; 330 Economics; 340 Law (thrust of changes to 341 International law approved; after more editorial work this schedule will be circulated to outside reviewers); 540 Chemistry; 551.46-.47 Oceanography; 616-617 Diseases and branches of medicine; and 630 Agriculture. Abridged edition 14's 560-590 Life sciences and 700 Arts schedules were also approved. EPC Meeting 115 will be held at the Library Nov. 29 - Dec. 1.


Music Library Association

Several of LC's staff members with responsibility for music materials attended the annual conference of the Music Library Association (MLA) in Louisville, Ky., February 23-26. Although not an announced theme of the event, metadata as a means toward enhancing bibliographic access was the topic of presenters in many of the public sessions. Prominent speakers who addressed the topic included Lois Mai Chan, University of Kentucky; Eric Childress, OCLC; Rebecca Dean, OCLC; and Sherry L. Vellucci, St. John's University. A basic principle of metadata schemes is to simplify the provision of access to bibliographic features of items. As applied, simplification results in the deconstruction of compound access points typical of traditional cataloging. This strategy does not readily accommodate musical works or the ways they exist physically. Research into the nature of bibliographic relationships demonstrates that musical works exhibit a very high number of such relationships (derivative, whole part, accompanying, etc.), a characteristic that metadata schemes need to take into account to be successful in retrieving bibliographic information about music. Efforts to map between MARC records for music and metadata categories are underway.

Updates of two documents that are products of MLA subcommittees have recently been issued, "Automation Requirements for Music Materials, (URL http://www.musiclibraryassoc.org/committee/co_adm_autoreq.htm) and "Types of Compositions for Use in Music Uniform Titles; a Manual for Use with AACR2 Chapter 25" (2nd, updated ed., rev. Feb. 2000; URL http://www.library.yale.edu/cataloging/music/types.htm).


Hirons Awarded Marcia Tuttle International Grant

The North American Serials Interest Group (NASIG) Awards & Recognition Committee and the interest group's Executive Board announced that Jean Hirons, CONSER coordinator, Library of Congress, has been awarded the Marcia Tuttle International Grant for 2000.

The Marcia Tuttle International Grant was established in 1998 to provide $1,000 for a NASIG member working in serials. The award fosters international communication and education through overseas activities such as, but not limited to, research, collaborative projects, job exchanges, and presentation of papers at conferences.

Hirons' project is to expand the CONSER program to the international arena. She will be traveling to Great Britain later this summer to extend the work of the Serials Cooperative Training Program, to promote CONSER membership, to support the proposed revisions to AACR2 relating to seriality, and to further cooperative efforts for serials cataloging in general.


Lubetzky Symposium Publication

John D. Byrum, chief, Regional and Cooperative Cataloging Division, and Barbara B. Tillett, director, Integrated Library System Program, are authors of chapters in the recently published The Future of Cataloging: Insights from the Lubetzky Symposium, April 18, 1998, University of California, Los Angeles edited by Tschera Harkness Connell and Robert L. Maxwell. Byrum's contribution is entitled "Cataloging at Crossroads: Preservation and Accommodation"; Tillett's is "Current Activities in Cataloging Code Revision". Other papers are by Michael Gorman, Michele V. Cloonan, Sara Shatford Layne, Allyson Carlyle, Michael Carpenter, Martha M. Yee, Gregory H. Leazer, Maurice J. Freedman, S. Michael Malinconico, Marcia J. Bates, and Margaret F. Maxwell. The 184-page volume, available from the American Library Association (Chicago and London, 2000; ISBN 0-8389-0778-4), also includes "The Vicissitudes of Ideology and Technology in Anglo-American Cataloging since Panizzi and a Prospective Reformation of the Catalog for the Next Century" by Lubetzky in collaboration with Elaine Svenonius.


LC CATALOGING NEWSLINE (ISSN 1066-8829) is published irregularly by the Cataloging Directorate, Library Services, Library of Congress, and contains news of cataloging activities throughout the Library of Congress. Editorial Office: Cataloging Policy and Support Office, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. 20540-4305. Editor, Robert M. Hiatt; Editorial Advisory Group: Victoria Behrens, John Byrum, Roselyne Chang, Jurij Dobczansky, Les Hawkins, Albert Kohlmeier, John Mitchell, Mary Louise Mitchell, Susan Morris, Geraldine Ostrove, David Smith, and David Williamson. Address editorial inquiries to the editor at the above address or [email protected] (email), (202) 707-5831 (voice), or (202) 707-6629 (fax). Listowner: David Williamson. Address subscription inquiries to the listowner at [email protected]

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