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 Home    Documentary Heritage of the Civil War    Part 5, 2015: "At War's End: A Nation Mourns and Rebuilds"    Lewis and Latané family papers, 1734-1937

Lewis and Latané family papers, 1734-1937

Burial of Latane

"Burial of Latané." Engraving by A.G. Campbell, after a painting by W.D. Washington, shows the funeral of William D. Latané.

Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Federal soldiers with rifles at Appomattox

Federal soldiers with rifles at Appomattox Court House, Va., April 1865

Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division

Location
University of Virginia Library, Charlottesville, Va. External Link
Background
Plantation owners, of Essex County, Va. Giles Buckner Cooke (1838-1937) served as a staff officer in the Confederate States Army throughout the Civil War and afterward became an Episcopal minister in Virginia, Maryland, and Kentucky. Captain William D. Latané, of the Essex Light Dragoons, Ninth Virginia Cavalry, died during a cavalry charge in June 1862.
Contents
Correspondence concerning family news and financial affairs, as well as slavery, visits to health resorts, the War of 1812, the Seminole Wars, the election of 1840, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Kentucky land speculation, and life at boarding school and College of William and Mary; financial and legal papers of county sheriff, Warner Lewis (1786-1873), consisting chiefly of store and plantation accounts and papers relating to the estates of Dr. John Lewis (d. ca. 1814) and Henry Waring (d. 1844); transcript of Civil War diary of Giles Buckner Cooke, describing final years of the war and particularly defense of Petersburg and Appomattox campaign; together with inventories, surveys, essays, poems, genealogical material, and other papers. Correspondents include Henry Waring Latané (1847-1893), Joseph Henry Lewis (1822-1850), and John Latané Lewis (b. 1820).
Two days after the surrender, Major Giles Buckner Cooke, at Appomattox, closed his Civil War diary with this quotation:

"I am a citizen slave, and what will become of me and the people of our Southland, God only knows."

(See the NUCMC catalog record)

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 Home    Documentary Heritage of the Civil War    Part 5, 2015: "At War's End: A Nation Mourns and Rebuilds"    Lewis and Latané family papers, 1734-1937
  The Library of Congress >> Cataloging, Acquisitions
   January 15, 2015
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