• Page 1 of [T. E. Hines]

    1 Folk Stuff - Early Settler Phipps, Woody Rangelore Tarrant Co., Dist. #7 [83?] Page #1 FC T. E. Mines, 68, was born on his father's farm in Wayne Co., N.C. He was taught to ride horses before he was eight, and worked them to plow with before he was 10. He decided to seek his fortune in Texas when he reached 21, and ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 2 of [T. E. Hines]

    2 Well sir, my dad just grinned and told me I might's well learn right now as later on down the road that punching cows wasn't the bed of roses it looked like. Ma bawled and cut up a lot about it, but after dad took her off and talked to her, she dried up and seemed to be resigned. I always figured he'd ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 3 of [T. E. Hines]

    3 say about my trampy outfit. Why, I looked a lot worse'n them old saddle bums that used to make the country, and'd never work for anybody at any price. Well, you see. I'd never been from behind my ma's apron strings and really didn't know how to make it around. All I had was the will not to go back, and you can't ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 4 of [T. E. Hines]

    4 a fiddle they used for music when they felt romantic, and having me read my bunk. That's what they called it when you looked into your covers for varmints. I just thought he was being nice to me because I was a new hand and he wanted me to get into the routine around there. "Well, sir. One of the boys came to ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 5 of [T. E. Hines]

    5 me more than 50 times before I finally stuck and stayed on one. I was so sore I walked like I had a hump in my back big's a camel's. Now you can laugh all you want to, but I was a wreck. Them rascals like to have got me before I got one of them. "That was good training for me though, ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 6 of [T. E. Hines]

    6 a precipice, a canyon wall, the banks of a deep arroyo, draw, or anything. They'll lead them right into water where a number of them are bound to drown. And, if a man happens to be in front of the herd and falls. Well, its just too bad for him for he had a bad day. "One of the most wonderful sights there ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 7 of [T. E. Hines]

    7 sporting some dudish trimmings on his hoss's reigns, and they tinkle as he gets off. You might's well fired a cannon because after one of them snorted, another snorted, and the race was on. "Of course, I was right at him when he got off his hoss, but I never did see who bowled him over with a real swift kick after the ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 8 of [T. E. Hines]

    8 the NUT after three years on it, I went over to J.R. Longacre's ranch. It was also in Erath Co., and was every bit as big a spread, if not maybe a little bigger. Longacre hired me hisself, after looking Star over and making me an offer for him. I wouldn't sell, so he gave me a job on the spread. Possibly thinking ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 9 of [T. E. Hines]

    9 bad, the others'd horn in and stop the fray. The whites on the spread didn't care how much they cut and gouged. In fact, a few of them encouraged more fights, thinking maybe they'd all kill each other and then we might have white cow punchers on the spread. No luck as far's that was concerned, though. "Now ranch work in Texas was ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 10 of [T. E. Hines]

    10 Mo. bankers. "There wasn't so many head on the spread, around 1,500. We had a lot of trouble with the Bandidoes from across the Mexican border. The spread wasn't but about 25 miles N. of the line to start with, and the country was plenty mountainous. That gives the bandidoes, Mexican bandits, rustlers, and so on, a better shot at the beef as ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 11 of [T. E. Hines]

    11 reason or other, and that way, nobody hardly ever knows just how any Indians get killed. Anyway, when the fight was over and the red skins kept trying to get one of them that had sneak his way up to where he had an awful advantage over the miners, or, burners, and Bob had opened up on him the first thing and killed ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Page 12 of [T. E. Hines]

    12 the tent where Bob was flopping, he stopped to look at the dead Indian that Bob had hung up on a tree about 20 foot from his tent. The captain told Bob not to harm the body because he intended to send a wagon out from the post to get it and give it a burial. "Bob said, 'burial, hell! That's my Indian ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Hines, T. E.
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
    • Date: 1941-02-11