• Page 1 of [Noah Armstrong]

    1 Folkstuff-Rangelore Range-Lore Elizabeth Doyle San Angelo, Texas. Page one RANGE-LORE Noah Armstrong, Ex-Texas Ranger and retired ranchman, came with his parents from Lincoln County, Missouri to Bell County, Texas when he was only one year old. "My childhood", says Mr. Armstrong, "was spent on the open range with my father, who owned the first horse ranch in Navarro County. Dealing in horses made ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 2 of [Noah Armstrong]

    2 Usually a few shots would frighten them away and we had only to be on guard an moonlight nights. On one occasion my father was severely ill and had only the hired boy and me to put on guard. Mother insisted that she take father's two guns and go out with us but he would not let her go. I was only ten ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 3 of [Noah Armstrong]

    3 we presented our check it wasn't any good. We were both just a couple of kids and didn't know anything else to do but start hoofing it in. The Mexican had 35¢ and thought we could live always on that. His lack of concern was as provoking as our plight. I didn't have a penny and was as mad as an old wet ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 4 of [Noah Armstrong]

    4 nothing had happened. I was too disturbed to sleep, though, and as I lay tossing about trying to rest my weary bones I heard foot steps creeping up to us. I sat up as two big ugly Indians came up and told me they were hungry and only wanted food. I knew their manner too well to refuse them, so I gave them ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 5 of [Noah Armstrong]

    5 upon a big plum thicket, some ten or fifteen acres, and as we went around it investigating as best we could, we saw a new trail leading to the interior. We were sure this was the place so we started single file down the long narrow path. When we rode upon them, a cousin and brother of the outlaw were making coffee and ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 6 of [Noah Armstrong]

    6 "The other three boys were told to take their prisoners to jail while we got some conveyance to carry Wilson's body back to Erath County for our reward. We got a wagon and some harness and used our own horses alternately on the long trip back. We put the body in the wagon bed and piled mesquite bushes over him and started about ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 7 of [Noah Armstrong]

    7 Stephenville, turned the body over to the authorities and received our reward. The state had offered $500.00 while the citizens had donated $500.00 and a section of land. This was rightfully divided and one of our boys, Gus Young who fell heir to the land, still lives on it and has done well. "On another occasion we were stationed at Double Mountain Fork ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 8 of [Noah Armstrong]

    8 got within about forty yards of us he opened fire with a winchester and we of course returned the fire at once. He fell from his horse, ran to the side of the road, jerked off his boots and died almost immediately. We went on into town and got the officers who returned with us and identified him as one of the Taylor ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 9 of [Noah Armstrong]

    9 month and Captain Sparks decided to go into Angelo. We got into the Sarg. Nasworthy Saloon and all got to drinking and gambling. Our boys seemed to lose heavier than usual but we considered it all in a day's fun and made the dances that night. In one place we were dancing around and a negro soldier danced right into one of our ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 10 of [Noah Armstrong]

    10 horse never grew that he couldn't ride. I have seen him ride 'em when I could hear his neck a poppin' every jump and often wondered how he came off alive but he always did. I had an old stool dust horse I always wanted him to try. He was the meanest horse I ever saw. I finally traded him to a boy ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 11 of [Noah Armstrong]

    11 much he decided to get in the lot and pet him. He had not more than entered the pen when the bull made a fatal plunge at him, ripping open his abdomen and goring him to death. This was the first person ever buried in Coleman. The doctor sold out everything and returned to Chicago. Some fifteen or twenty years later he returned ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 12 of [Noah Armstrong]

    12 and he took their $500.00 each and worked them nearly to death that year as common cowhands. "I knew Tom Ketchum when I saw him and while I was not too familiar with the details of his scrapes I have heard that he wasn't as bad as he was painted and that he was driven to some of the dark deeds which he ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material
  • Page 13 of [Noah Armstrong]

    13 little tight roll of cotton which I carry in this cartridge hull is always dry and ready to light from the sparks, so I'm going down my last hill about as near like I would have it as most anyone I know. My wife is dead and my children all married; but my turkeys, chickens, cows, and sheep are good company and I'm ...

    • Contributor: Doyle, Elizabeth - Armstrong, Noad
    • Original Format: Manuscripts/Mixed Material