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  • Byron G. Harlan

    Byron G. Harlan (1861–1936) was a versatile tenor who specialized in sentimental ballads. He also performed as a comedian and frequently recorded in the character of a "rube" in sketches with Frank ...

    Site/Collection: The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Jukebox - Performing Arts Encyclopedia
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Of Thee I Sing

    Article. View posters from the New Deal era in American Memory

    Contributor: Library of Congress
    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - Patriotic Melodies - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages
    Date: 2002

  • " Come, O Thou Traveler" by Harvey Bartlett Gaul

    Article. At the second stanza, "Yield to me now, for I am weak," Gaul changes the key to C major and the texture to solo quartet. The full chorus reenters at "'Tis ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - American Choral Music - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • "The Witch, Op. 5" by Edward MacDowell

    Article. From 1896 to 1898, MacDowell published four partsongs for the Mendelssohn Glee Club under the pseudonym of Edgar Thorn, fearing the members would feel obligated to accept the songs if he ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - American Choral Music - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • "O How Amiable" by Dudley Buck

    Article. Buck's sacred compositions include large-scale works, four cantatas, 55 anthems and 20 sacred songs. He played a central role in the development of organ and choral music in the United States.

    Site/Collection: American Choral Music - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Performing Arts Encyclopedia
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Stephen Collins Foster, 1826-1864

    Austin, William W. "Susanna", "Jeanie", and "The Old Folks at Home": The Songs of Stephen C. Foster from His Time to Ours. 2d ed. Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1988.

    Site/Collection: The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Performing Arts Encyclopedia
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Hawaiian Song

    Colleges and university programs in Hawai'i participate in the revitalization of Hawaiian language and culture. An example available in this presentation comes from Hawai'i Community College in Hilo, Hawai'i, where a program ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Traditional and Ethnic - Ethnic Song Articles
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • " Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child" by Harry Thacker Burleigh

    Article. The alto carries the stately melody accompanied by a mournful, falling motive in the two soprano lines on the word "oh." The top-voiced harmonization is creative, and the melodic writing is ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - American Choral Music - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Traditional and Ethnic
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Michael Daugherty

    Michael Daugherty (b. 1954) is one of the most popular American composers of his generation. He is known for evocative compositions inspired by pop culture such as the Metropolis Symphony (1988-93) inspired ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Spanish American Song

    The music of Spanish, or Sephardic, Jews of the Iberian Peninsula has also found a place in the United States. They were expelled from Spain in the fifteenth century, and subsequently migrated ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Traditional and Ethnic - Ethnic Song Articles
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Ernst Bacon, 1898-1990

    ________. Words on Music. Syracuse University Press, 1960.

    Site/Collection: The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Performing Arts Encyclopedia
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Hail Columbia

    Article. Up until the 1890s "Hail Columbia" was played as the de facto national anthem of the United States. President Lincoln once mentioned he had to stand up and take off his ...

    Contributor: Library of Congress
    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - Patriotic Melodies - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages
    Date: 2002

  • Robert Sonkin (1911-1980)

    Voices from the Dust Bowl: The Charles L. Todd and Robert Sonkin Migrant Worker Collection (American Memory).

    Contributor: Sonkin, Robert
    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Traditional and Ethnic
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Songs of the Peace Movement of World War I

    When the United States entered the war, many who voted for Wilson on the basis of his non-interventionist stance were profoundly disillusioned, in spite of the campaign to inspire support for the ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Maceo Pinkard, 1897-1962

    Biography. Biography. Composer Maceo Pinkard was born in Bluefield, West Virginia, in 1897. After his "Oh, You Darktown Regimental Band" was published in 1920 by the first black-owned music publishing company, Pace ...

    Site/Collection: African American Band Music & Recordings, 1883 to 1923 - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Performing Arts Encyclopedia
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Septimus Winner (1827-1902)

    Biography. In addition to his music writing and publishing, Winner was a frequent contributor to Graham's Magazine, at that time edited by Edgar Allen Poe. He wrote a book of poetry, published ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - American Choral Music - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Sidney Homer

    Sidney Homer (1864-1953) studied with George Chadwick in Boston, and with others in Germany. In 1895, he married contralto Louise Beatty (Homer), a world-renown opera singer who sang often at the Metropolitan ...

    Contributor: Homer, Sidney
    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • " He Met Her in a Meadow" by Harry Thacker Burleigh

    Article. Burleigh's He Met Her in a Meadow was first published for solo male voice in 1921. G. Ricordi & Co., New York, published versions for mixed chorus, men's chorus, and women's ...

    Site/Collection: Performing Arts Encyclopedia - American Choral Music - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Traditional and Ethnic
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • Reinald Werrenrath

    Reinald Werrenrath (1883–1953) was an American baritone of great versatility who sang on several hundred Victor recordings, both as a soloist and as part of vocal ensembles. Among the groups in which ...

    Site/Collection: The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Jukebox - Performing Arts Encyclopedia
    Original Format: Web Pages

  • "The Hawthorn Tree (1896)" by Margaret Ruthven Lang

    Article. 1. W. S. B. Matthews, ed., The Great in Music: A Systematic Course of Study in the Music of Classical and Modern Composers (Chicago: Music Magazine Publishing Co., 1900), 277-79.

    Site/Collection: American Choral Music - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Performing Arts Encyclopedia
    Original Format: Web Pages