Collection The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

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Results for "Bascom Lamar Lunsford"  1 - 14 of 14

  • Death of Queen Jane

    Performance of an old English ballad as learned in North Carolina by folklorist and performer Bascom Lamar Lunsford, of Asheville, North Carolina. sound recording | 1 sound recording | Forms part of the Bascom Lamar Lunsford recording project, 1949 collection. (Source). Recorded in 1949. (Date). Recorded at the Library of Congress. (Venue). Sound Recording (Form).

    • Contributor: Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Emrich, Duncan
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
  • Mountain Dew

    Performance of an original anti-Prohibition song by folklorist and performer Bascom Lamar Lunsford, of Asheville, North Carolina. Composed in 1920. Versions of this song entered oral tradition and consequently it is often thought to be a folk song. sound recording | 1 sound recording | Forms part of the Bascom Lamar Lunsford recording project, 1949 collection. (Source). Recorded in 1949. (Date). Recorded at the ...

    • Contributor: Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Emrich, Duncan
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
  • Old Gray Mare

    sound recording | 1 cylinder | Bascom Lamar Lunsford was a lawyer, a folklorist, and a performer of traditional songs and music. (Biographical). October 19, 1925. Robert Winslow Gordon Cylinder Collection. (Source). Spoken by Lunsford at the end of this recording: "Bascom Lamar Lunsford, who just sung the foregoing, learned it from Curtis Miles at Alexander, Buncombe County, North Carolina, near the home of ...

    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Gordon, Robert Winslow
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1978
  • Booth Killed Lincoln

    sound recording | 1 sound recording | Forms part of the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Recording Project, 1949. (Source). First published on the Library of Congress LP AFS L28, "Songs of American History and the Assassination of Presidents," 1952. (Bibliographic History). Recorded in March 1949. (Date). Sound Recording (Form).

    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Emrich, Duncan
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1952
  • Charles Giteau

    sound recording | 1 sound recording | Forms part of the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Recording Project, 1949. (Source). First published on the Library of Congress LP AFS L28, "Songs of American History and the Assassination of Presidents," 1952. (Bibliographic History). Recorded in March 1949. (Date). Concerns the assassination of President Garfield in 1881. (Content). Sound Recording (Form).

    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Emrich, Duncan
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1952
  • Mr. Garfield

    sound recording | 1 sound recording | Forms part of the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Recording Project, 1949. (Source). First published on the Library of Congress LP AFS L28, "Songs of American History and the Assassination of Presidents," 1952. (Bibliographic History). Recorded in March 1949. (Date). Concerns the assassination of President Garfield in 1881. (Content). Sound Recording (Form).

    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Emrich, Duncan
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1952
  • Zolgotz

    sound recording | 1 sound recording | Forms part of the Bascom Lamar Lunsford Recording Project, 1949. (Source). First published on the Library of Congress LP AFS L28, "Songs of American History and the Assassination of Presidents," 1952. (Bibliographic History). Recorded in March 1949. (Date). The song describes the assasination of President William McKinley by Leon Czolgosz in September 1901. (Content). Sound Recording (Form).

    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Emrich, Duncan
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1952
  • Hesitation Blues

    sound recording | 1 cylinder | Robert Winslow Gordon Cylinder Collection. (Source). October 19, 1925. (Date). Bascom Lamar Lunsford was a lawyer, a folklorist, and a performer of traditional songs and music. (Biographical). This song was published on the Library of Congress long playing record, "Folk-Songs of America: The Robert Winslow Gordon Collection," in 1978, in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Archive ...

    • Contributor: Library of Congress - Gordon, Robert Winslow - Lunsford, Bascom Lamar
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1978
  • Booth killed Lincoln [illustrated]

    motion picture | 1 video ; 2 min. | Audio track taken from AFS 9512 B1 (General). Photographs and drawings from Library of Congress online resources. (General). Photos Used: [Miss Margot Mayo and Miss Deska of American Square Dance Group of New York City and Bascom Lamar Lunsford (center), director of the Mountain Music Festival, Asheville, North Carolina] (http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsc.00452 ) -- John Wilkes Booth ...

    • Contributor: Lunsford, Bascom Lamar - Emrich, Duncan
    • Original Format: Film, Video
  • Regional Song Sampler: The Southeast

    Return to Mapping the Songs of America

  • Printable Timeline -- The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

    1850 Songs of America Stephen Foster composes 'The Voice of Bygone Days', 'Molly, Do You Love Me?', and 'Ah! May the Red Rose Live Alway!' 'Go Down Moses,' a spiritual sung by the Tuskegee Institute Singers, 1914. Harriet Tubman reported using this song to identify herself to slaves that might want to escape and flee north with her by singing it in a neighboring ...

  • Robert Winslow Gordon (1888-1961)

    Biography. Kodish, Debora G. "Good Friends and Bad Enemies": Robert Winslow Gordon and the Study of American Folksong. University of Illinois Press, 1986.

    • Contributor: Gordon, Robert Winslow
  • Traditional Ballads -- The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

    Introduction Traditional ballads are narrative folksongs - simply put, they are folksongs that tell stories. They tell all kinds of stories, including histories, legends, fairy tales, animal fables, jokes, and tales of outlaws and star-crossed lovers. ("Ballad" is a term also used in the recording industry for slow, romantic songs, but these should not be confused with traditional or folk ballads.) Many traditional ballads ...

  • Printable Timeline -- The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

    1900 Songs of America Amy Marcy Cheney Beach sets to music Three Browning Songs, including "Ah, Love, But a Day and "The Year's at the Spring." John Rosamond Johnson writes the anthem "Lift Every Voice and Sing" to lyrics by James Weldon Johnson. The King Family performs the traditional dance song "Cripple Creek" on string band instruments: banjo, mandolin, guitar, fiddle, and bass fiddle. ...