• I Ain't Got Nobody

    Field Recordings. Music. sound recording | 1 sound disc : analog ; 12 in. | Collector's genre note: "adapted from old popular song and recorded by Hattie Ellis as blues" Venue: Goree State Farm Performance Note: "I Ain't Got Nobody" performed by Hattie Ellis (vocals and guitar) at Goree State Farm, near Huntsville, Texas, on May 14, 1939. In English. (Language). Also included in ...

    • Contributor: Ellis, Hattie - Lomax, John Avery - Lomax, Ruby T. (Ruby Terrill) - Ramsey, Jack "Cowboy - Guitar
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1939-05-14
  • Desert Blues

    Field Recordings. Music. sound recording | 1 sound disc : analog ; 12 in. | Venue: Goree State Farm Performance Note: "Desert Blues" performed by Hattie Ellis (vocals and guitar) at Goree State Farm, near Huntsville, Texas, on May 14, 1939. In English. (Language). Also included in The John and Ruby Lomax 1939 Southern States Recording Trip. (Exhibitions). Sound Recording (Form). Sound Disc (Form).

    • Contributor: Ellis, Hattie - Lomax, John Avery - Lomax, Ruby T. (Ruby Terrill) - Ramsey, Jack "Cowboy - Guitar
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1939-05-14
  • It's a Blessin' Jes' to Call My Savior's Name

    Field Recordings. Music. sound recording | 1 sound disc : analog ; 12 in. | Venue: Goree State Farm, Women's Camp Performance Note: "It's a Blessin' Jes' to Call My Savior's Name" performed by Lavena Austin, Gene Raymond, Jimmie Lee Hart, Hattie Ellis, Mozelle Stewart, Ella Mae Fitzpatrick, and Doris McMurray (vocals) at Goree State Farm, Women's Camp, near Huntsville, Texas, on May 14, ...

    • Contributor: McMurray, Doris - Stewart, Mozelle - Raymond, Gene - Austin, Lavena - Hart, Jimmie Lee - Fitzpatrick, Ella Mae - Ellis, Hattie - Lomax, John Avery - Lomax, Ruby T. (Ruby Terrill)
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1939-05-14
  • Cap'n Don't 'low No Truckin'-round in Here

    Field Recordings. Music. sound recording | 1 sound disc : analog ; 12 in. | Venue: Goree State Farm, Women's Camp Performance Note: "Cap'n Don't 'low No Truckin'-round in Here" performed by Gene Raymond, Jimmie Lee Hart, Hattie Ellis, Ella Mae Fitzpatrick, Mozelle Stewart, Lavena Austin and Doris McMurray (vocals) at Goree State Farm, Women's Camp, near Huntsville, Texas, on May 14, 1939. In ...

    • Contributor: Raymond, Gene - Austin, Lavena - Stewart, Mozelle - Fitzpatrick, Ella Mae - McMurray, Doris - Hart, Jimmie Lee - Ellis, Hattie - Lomax, John Avery - Lomax, Ruby T. (Ruby Terrill)
    • Original Format: Audio Recordings
    • Date: 1939-05-14
  • Hattie polka

    Sheet Music. print | 1 score | From: Music Copyright Deposits, 1870-1885 (Microfilm M 3500) Also available through the Library of Congress Web Site as facsimile page images. (Additional Physical Form). Print (Form). Electronic Resource (Form). Remote (Form).

    • Contributor: Ellis & Co., George H. - Hadley, W. C.
    • Original Format: Notated Music
    • Date: 1871
  • Regional Sampler: The Southwest

    Return to Mapping the Songs of America

  • Songs of the Temperance Movement and Prohibition

    Many of the songs related to Prohibition are no longer sung. Some of the popular songs were recorded comercially, and preserved in that way. Others survive because folk song collectors like Stetson Kennedy, Sidney Robertson Cowell, and Alan Lomax were out documenting songs with early disc recording equipment not long after the repeal of Prohibition, when people still remembered and sang them.

  • Printable Timeline -- The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

    1900 Songs of America Amy Marcy Cheney Beach sets to music Three Browning Songs, including "Ah, Love, But a Day and "The Year's at the Spring." John Rosamond Johnson writes the anthem "Lift Every Voice and Sing" to lyrics by James Weldon Johnson. The King Family performs the traditional dance song "Cripple Creek" on string band instruments: banjo, mandolin, guitar, fiddle, and bass fiddle. ...

    • Date: 1900
  • Songs of Immigration and Migration -- The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

    As Europeans colonized North America, beginning with the Spanish and French in the 1500s and the British and Dutch in the early 1600s, colonists brought their cultural entertainments along with them. Songs brought to colonial America continued to be sung in their early forms, so that later scholars of songs and ballads, such as the British ethnomusicologist Cecil Sharp and American ballad scholar Francis ...

  • African American Song

    From rappers like André 3000 (1975–) and pop stars like Michael Jackson (1958–2009), to opera singers like Denyce Graves (1964–) and gospel artists like Yolanda Adams (1961–), African American vocal artists continue to shake up and shape the musical culture of the United States in profound ways.