Library of Congress > Collections with Manuscripts > Aaron Copland Collection

Aaron Copland Works List  >  Alphabetic Listing by Title

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Alone
Form: Song for voice and piano
Date: 1922
Text: E. Powys Mathers, from the Arabic
First performance: 4 December, 1985. New York. Jan DeGaetani, voice; Gilbert Kalish, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1989
Notes: fourth of the songs published in 1989 as Four Early Songs; listed here alone since it is the only one of these songs written after his embarkation for France in 1921. Copland arranged this song for voice and orchestra in 1923
An Evening Air
Form: Piano
Date: 1966
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1972
Timing: 3'
Notes: An excerpt from The Cummington Story arranged for piano. The title is from Theodore Roethke: “I see, in evening air / How slowly dark comes down on what we do.” The sketches show that this was originally to be the second movement of a suite. It was to be titled “The Deserted Churchyard.” There is no sign of what the first movement was to be
An Immorality
Form: Women's chorus, solo soprano, and piano
Date: 1925
Text: Ezra Pound; from Lustra
First performance: 24 April 1925. New York. Women’s University Glee Club, cond. Gerald Reynolds
Publisher: E.C. Schirmer
Date of publication: 1926
Timing: 4'
Dedication: “to Gerald Reynolds”
Notes: often grouped with (but seldom performed with) The House on the Hill as “Two Choruses.”
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An Outdoor Overture
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1938
First performance: 16 December 1938. New York High School of Music and Art Orchestra, cond. A. Richter
Publisher: Hawkes & son
Date of publication: 1940
Timing: 10'
Dedication: “Written for and dedicated to the High School for Music and Art, New York”
Notes: arranged for band, 1941. Opening material is from Signature for the High-Low Concerts
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Appalachian Spring
Form: Ballet
Date: 1944
Scenario: Martha Graham
First performance: 30 October, 1944. Washington, D.C.; Martha Graham Dance Company
Publisher: not published as a ballet
Timing: 33'
Dedication: Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge
Notes: the ballet itself is scored for 13 instruments. In 1945 Copland arranges a suite from the ballet for full orchestra. The ballet includes the Shaker hymn “Simple Gifts,” which is also one of the Old American Songs, Set 1. The section of the ballet based on “Simple Gifts” was arranged for band in 1956 as Shaker Variations. Correspondence concerning the suite may be accessed from the listing for the suite
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Appalachian Spring
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1945
First performance: May, 1945. Boston Symphony Orchestra, cond. Serge Koussevitzky
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1945
Timing: 25'
Dedication: Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge
Notes: the ballet itself is scored for 13 instruments. The suite, which includes most of the music from the ballet, is for full orchestra. The suite includes the Shaker hymn “Simple Gifts,” which is also one of the Old American Songs, Set 1. The section of Appalachian Spring based on “Simple Gifts” was arranged for band in 1956 as Shaker Variations. The Suite was published in the ballet’s scoring for 13 instruments by Boosey & Hawkes in 1972
As It Fell upon a Day
Form: Voice, flute, and clarinet
Date: 1923
Text: Richard Barnefield
First performance: 6 February 1924. Paris. Ada MacLeish, soprano
Publisher: New Music, volume 2 no. 4
Date of publication: July 1929
Timing: 5'
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B

Ballade of Ozzie Powell
Form: Mixed chorus and piano
Date: December 1936-January 1937
Text: Langston Hughes: “Ballad of Ozie Powell”
Publisher: Unpublished
Publisher: Unpublished
Timing: circa 2'
Notes: unfinished. Music was used in Music for Radio. Ozie Powell – not "Ozzie" – was one of the Scottsboro Boys
Billy the Kid
Form: Ballet
Date: 1938
Scenario: Lincoln Kirstein
Choreography: William Loring
First performance: 16 October 1938. Chicago. Ballet Caravan
Publisher: Not published as a ballet
Timing: 35'
Notes: Copland arranged a Suite from Billy the Kid in 1938. Correspondence involving publication and performances of the suite may be accessed through the entry for the suite
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Billy the Kid (Suite)
Form: Orchestra. Arranged for two pianos; excerpts arranged for piano
Date: 1938
First performance: 9 November 1940. New York. NBC Symphony Orchestra, cond. William Steinberg
Publisher: (Orchestra): Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1941
Timing: 22'
Contents: (Titles taken from two-piano version): I. The Open Prairie II. In a Frontier Town A. Cowboys with Lassos B. Mexican Dance and Finale III. Billy and His Sweetheart IV. Celebration of Billy’s Capture V. Billy’s Demise VI. The Open Prairie Again
Notes: the suite is in fact continuous. The orchestral version as published has no titles besides “Introduction: The Open Prairie” and “Scene IA: Street in a Frontier Town.” Various other versions supply the following variant titles: for IIA, “Cowboys Amble By.” For III. “Prairie Night and Waltz from Billy the Kid.”
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C

Canticle of Freedom
Form: Chorus and orchestra
Date: 1955
Text: John Barbour, modernized by Willis Wager
First performance: 8 May 1955. Cambridge, Mass. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Chorus and Orchestra, cond. Klaus Liepmann
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1968
Timing: 13'
Notes: Revised in 1967. The opening is based on the opening of the unfinished Let Us Now Praise Famous Men. Chávez had set this text, which Copland probably found for him in Louis Untermeyer’s anthology Treasury of Great Poems, English and American, in 1942
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Ceremonial Fanfare
Form: Brass
Date: 1969
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1974
Timing: 3'
Notes: for 4 horns, 3 trumpets, 3 trombones and tuba. “Commissioned by the New York City Metropolitan Museum of Art in Celebration of its Centennial Year – 1969"
Concerto for Clarinet and String Orchestra
Date: 1947-1949
First performance: 6 November 1950. New York. NBC Symphony Orchestra, cond. Fritz Reiner; Benny Goodman, clarinet
Timing: 17'
Dedication: “for Benny Goodman”
Contents: I. Slowly and expressively II. Rather fast
Notes: Choreographed in 1951 by Jerome Robbins as Pied Piper
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Concerto for Piano and Orchestra
Date: 1926
First performance: 28 January 1927. Boston Symphony Orchestra, cond. Serge Koussevitzky. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Cos Cob Press
Date of publication: 1929
Timing: 18'
Dedication: “to Alma Wertheim.”
Contents: I. Andante sostenuto II. Molto moderato / Allegro assai
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Connotations
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1961-1962
First performance: 23 September 1962. New York. New York Philharmonic, cond. Leonard Bernstein
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1963
Timing: 20'
Dedication: “Commissioned by the New York Philharmonic in celebration of its opening season in the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and dedicated to the members of the orchestra and its music director Leonard Bernstein”
Notes: The first performance took place at the opening concert of the Lincoln Center
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Cortege Macabre
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1923
First performance: 1 May, 1925, N.Y.: Rochester Philharmonic, Howard Hanson, conductor
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1978
Timing: 8'
Dedication: Harold Clurman
Notes: an excerpt from Grohg
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D

Dance Panels
Form: Ballet
Date: 1959
First performance: 3 December 1963. Munich. Choreography: Heinz Rosen
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1965
Timing: 26'
Contents: I. Moderato (Tempo di valzer) II. Allegretto con tenerezza III. Scherzando IV. Pas de trois: Lento V. Con brio VI. Con moto VII. Molto ritmico
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Dance Symphony
Date: 1925
First performance: 15 April 1931. Philadelphia. Philadelphia Orchestra, Leopold Stokowski, cond.
Publisher: Cos Cob Press
Date of publication: 1931
Timing: 18'
Dedication: "to Harold Clurman"
Contents: Introduction: Lento I. Subito doppio movimento; Molto allegro II. Andante Moderato III. Allegro vivo
Notes: excerpts from Grohg. This is not one of the three numbered symphonies.
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Danzón Cubano
Form: Two pianos; arranged for orchestra
Date: 1942
First performance: 17 December 1942. New York. Leonard Bernstein and Aaron Copland, pianos.; (orchestral version): 17 February 1946. Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, cond. Reginald Stewart
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1943
Timing: 6'
Dedication: “to Rudy” [Burckhardt] (No dedication in orchestra score)
Notes: “Composed especially for the twentieth anniversary of the League of Composers.”
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Dirge in Woods
Form: Song for voice and piano
Date: 1954
Text: George Meredith
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1957
Timing: 3'
Dedication: “Written especially in honor of Nadia Boulanger’s fiftieth year of teaching.”
Notes: Boulanger had asked Copland to write two songs for her. He could finish only one
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Down a Country Lane
Form: Piano
Date: 1962
Publisher: Life magazine
Publisher: Life magazine
Date of publication: 1962
Timing: 3'
Notes: arranged for school orchestra by the composer, 1965
Duo for Flute and Piano
Date: 1970-1971
First performance: 3 October 1971. Philadelphia. Elaine Shaffer, flute; Hepzibah Menuhin, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1971
Timing: 14'
Dedication: “to the memory of William Kincaid”
Contents: I. Flowing II. Poetic, somewhat mournful III. Lively, with bounce
Notes: based on material sketched during the 1940s. Second movement published separately as “Poem” in 1977
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E

El Salón México
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1936
First performance: 27 August 1937 Orquésta Sinfónico de México, cond. Carlos Chávez
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1939
Timing: 12'
Dedication: "to Victor Kraft."
Notes: Arranged for piano by Leonard Bernstein in 1939
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Elegies for Violin and Viola
Date: 1932
First performance: 2 April 1933. New York. Charlotte & Ivor Karman
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: withdrawn when material from the Elegies was used in the fourth movement (“Subjective”) of Statements. The close of Elegies was used as the end of the third movement of the Third Symphony
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Emblems
Form: Band
Date: 1964
First performance: December 18, 1964. Tempe, Arizona: The Trojan Band of the University of Southern California, cond. William Schaefer
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1965
Timing: 11'
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Episode
Form: Organ
Date: 1941
First performance: 9 March 1941. William Strickland, organ
Timing: 4'
Notes: Copland’s original title for this piece was “Improvisation.”
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F

Fanfare for the Common Man
Form: Brass and percussion
Date: 1942
First performance: 12 March 1943. Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, cond. Eugene Goossens
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1944
Timing: 2'
Notes: used as introduction to the finale of the Third Symphony
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Five Kings
Form: Incidental music for play
Date: 1939
Text: Shakespeare’s chronicle plays, adapted by Orson Welles
First performance: 27 February 1939. Boston. Mercury Theter, dir. Orson Welles
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: for five instruments
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Five sentimental melodies
Form: Piano
Date: 1926
Publisher: Unpublished as a suite
Publisher: Unpublished as a suite
Notes: “Blues no. 1" was published as Sentimental Melody (Slow Dance) “Blues no. 2" became the fourth of the Four piano blues
Four Dance Episodes from Rodeo
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1942
First performance: 28 May 1943. Boston Pops Orchestra, cond. Arthur Fiedler
Publisher: Hawkes & Son
Date of publication: 1946
Timing: 18'
Contents: I. Buckaroo Holiday II. Corral Nocturne III. Saturday Night Waltz IV. Hoe-Down
Notes: for further correspondence see the ballet Rodeo
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Four Early Songs
Principle medium: Song
Other medium: Piano
Date: 1918
Text: I.-III.: Aaron Schaffer. IV. E. Powys Mathers, from the Arabic
First performance: I.-III.: 9 November 1986. Austin, Texas. Darlene Wiley, voice; David Garvey, piano. IV. 4 December, 1985. New York. Jan DeGaetani, voice; Gilbert Kalish, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1989
Songs: I. Night II. A Summer Vacation III. My Heart is in the East IV. Alone
Four Motets
Form: Unaccompanied mixed chorus
Date: 1921
Text: “from Biblical sources”
First performance: Autumn 1924. Paris-American-Gargenville Chorus, cond. Melville Smith
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1979
Timing: 13'
Contents: I. Help Us, O Lord II. Thou, O Jehovah, Abideth Forever III. Have Mercy on Us, O My Lord IV. Sing Ye Praises To Our King
Notes: the texts are credited as being from “Biblical sources,” but it seems more likely that they are Copland’s own texts in imitation of Old-Testament language. (The fourth word of the second text should, after all, be “abidest”.)
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Four Piano Blues
Date: 1926-1948
First performance: 13 March 1950. New York. Leo Smit, paino
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1949
Timing: 8'
Dedication: I. “For Leo Smit.” II. “For Andor Foldes.” III. “For William Kapell.” IV. “For John Kirkpatrick.”
Contents: I. Freely poetic II. Soft and languid III. Muted and sensuous IV. With bounce
Notes: the dates of the four pieces are 1947, 1934, 1948, and 1926 respectively. The second is a reworking of music from Hear Ye! Hear Ye!. The fourth was originally a part of the unpublished piano suite Five Sentimental Melodies
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From Sorcery to Science
Form: Incidental music
First performance: New York World’s Fair, 1939. Pickup orchestra (conducted by Copland?); Lowell Thomas, narrator. First live performance: 2 February 1998. New York. Eos Orchestra, cond. Jonathan Sheffer
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: performed as recorded music accompanying a puppet show by Remo Bufano
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G

Grohg
Form: Ballet
Date: 1922-1925
Scenario: Harold Clurman
First performance: 20 June 1992. London. London Sinfonietta, cond. Oliver Knussen (revised version); unperformed as a stage work.
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1993
Timing: 32'
Notes: music used in Cortege Macabre and Dance Symphony
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H

Happy Anniversary
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1969
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1971
Timing: 1'
Dedication: “For Eugene Ormandy’s seventieth birthday”
Notes: On the tune “Happy Birthday to You.”
Hear Ye! Hear Ye!
Form: Ballet
Date: 1934
Scenario: Ruth Page
Choreography: Ruth Page
First performance: 30 November 1934. Chicago. Ruth Page & her Company
Publisher: Unpublished
Timing: 32'
Notes: A section of this ballet became the second of the Four Piano Blues
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I

In the Beginning
Form: Mezzo-soprano solo and unaccompanied mixed chorus
Date: 1947
Text: Genesis I:1 - II:7.
First performance: 2 May, 1947. Cambridge, Mass. The Collegiate Chorale, cond. Robert Shaw
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1947
Timing: 17'
Notes: written for the Harvard Symposium on Music Criticism
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Inaugural Fanfare
Form: Band
Date: 1969
First performance: 14 June 1969, Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestra, cond. Gregory Millar
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1976
Timing: 3'
Notes: Revised 1975. “Commissioned by the city of Grand Rapids, Michigan, for its new City-County Plaza in Vandenberg Center, and the unveiling of Alexander Calder’s stabile ‘La Grande Vitesse’”
Inscape
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1967
First performance: 13 September 1967. Ann Arbor, Michigan. New York Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Leonard Bernstein
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1968
Timing: 13'
Notes: the title is a word coined by Gerard Manley Hopkins
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Into the Streets May First
Form: Song for voice (or unison chorus) and piano
Date: 1934
Text: from Alfred Hayes, “Into the Streets May First”
First performance: 29 April 1934, New York
Publisher: The New Masses
Date of publication: May 1, 1934
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J

John Henry
Form: Radio orchestra
Date: 1940
First performance: 5 March 1940. Columbia Symphony Orchestra, cond. Howard Barlow
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1953
Timing: 4'
Notes: Revised for standard small orchestra, 1952. A version for school orchestra was published by Boosey & Hawkes in 1982
Jubilee Variation
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1944-1945
First performance: 23 March 1945. Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, cond. Eugene Goossens
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1987
Timing: 2'
Notes: Copland’s movement for a work in which each of several composers wrote a variation on a theme by Eugene Goossens
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L

Lark
Form: Baritone solo and unaccompanied mixed chorus
Date: 1938
Text: Genevieve Taggard
First performance: 13 April 1943. New York. Collegiate Chorale, cond. Robert Shaw
Publisher: E.C. Schirmer
Date of publication: 1941
Timing: 4'
Dedication: “to Alma Wiener”
Las Agachadas (The Shake-Down Song)
Form: Unaccompanied mixed chorus
Date: 1942
Text: from Kurt Schindler, Folk Music and Poetry of Spain and Portugal
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1942
Timing: 3'
Notes: An arrangement of melody no. 202 in Schindler’s collection Folk Music and Poetry of Spain and Portugal
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Let Us Now Praise Famous Men
Form: Chorus and orchestra
Date: 1949
Text: Ecclesiasticus 44:1-14
Notes: meant to celebrate Serge Koussevitzky’s 25th year conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra. The opening idea was reused in Canticle of Freedom. An orchestral interlude foreshadows the opening motive of the Piano Fantasy
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Letter from Home
Form: Radio orchestra
Date: 1944
First performance: 17 October 1944. Philco Radio Hour Orchestra, cond. Paul Whiteman
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1964
Timing: 6'
Notes: Originally scored for radio orchestra; rescored for standard orchestra by the composer, 1944. Standard-orchestra version revised in 1962
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Lincoln Portrait
Form: Narrator and orchestra
Date: 1942
First performance: 14 May 1942. Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, cond. André Kostelanetz
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1942
Timing: 14'
Dedication: André Kostelanetz
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M

Mid-Day Thoughts
Form: Piano
Date: 1982
First performance: 1983 February 28. Bennett Lerner
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1984
Timing: 5'
Dedication: “To Bennett Lerner”
Notes: published with Proclamation for Piano as “Two Piano Pieces.” Based on the slow movement of a projected Ballade for Piano and Orchestra of 1944
Midsummer Nocturne
Form: Piano
Date: 1977
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1977
Timing: 2'
Dedication: “To Phillip Ramey”
Miracle at Verdun
Form: Incidental music
Date: 1931
Play: Hans Chlumberg
First performance: 16 March 1931, New York
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: For small orchestra (no upper strings) and chorus. The music for chorus is for the most part liturgical
Movement for String Quartet
Date: 1921
First performance: 1921 December 15. Paris
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1988
Timing: 4.5'
Dedication: “to Vivian Perlis”
Notes: First performance after 1921: 18 October, 1984, Alexander String Quartet. Music from this piece was incorporated into the Symphony for Organ and Orchestra.
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Music for a Great City
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1964
First performance: 26 may 1964. London. London Symphony Orchestra, cond. Aaron Copland
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1965
Timing: 24'
Dedication: “Commissioned by the London Symphony Orchestra in Celebration of its Sixtieth Anniversary Season and Dedicated to the Members of the Orchestra.”
Contents: I. Skyline II. Night Thoughts III. Subway Jam IV. Toward the Bridge
Notes: a suite drawn from the music to Something Wild
Music for Radio
Form: Radio orchestra
Date: 1937
First performance: 25 July 1937. Columbia Symphony Orchestra, cond. Howard Barlow
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1940
Timing: 12'
Dedication: "to Davidson Taylor."
Notes: sometimes known as “Saga of the Prairie,” the winning entry in a competition to name the piece. Revised in 1968 with the title “Prairie Journal.” This piece uses material from the unfinished choral work Ballad of Ozzie Powell
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Music for the Movies
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1942
First performance: New York. Saidenberg Little Symphony
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1970 ( with Robbins retaining copyright on II and V)
Timing: 16'
Dedication: "to Darius Milhaud."
Contents: I. New England Countryside II. Barley Wagons III. Sunday Traffic IV. Grovers Corners V. Threshing Machines
Notes: Drawn from the film scores for Of Mice and Men (II and V), Our Town (IV), and The City (I and III)
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Music for the Theatre
Form: Chamber orchestra
Date: 1925
First performance: 20 November 1925. Boston. Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, conductor
Publisher: Cos Cob Press
Date of publication: 1932
Timing: 22'
Dedication: "to Serge Koussevitzky."
Contents: I. Prologue: Molto moderato / Subito allegro molto / Tempo I II. Dance: Allegro molto III. Interlude: Lento moderato IV. Burlesque: Allegro vivo V. Epilogue: Moderato / Lento molto
Notes: a ballet danced to this work, entitled Tragödie im Suden, was prepared in scenario by the publisher but never produced
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N

Night Thoughts (Homage to Ives)
Form: Piano
Date: 1977
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1973
Timing: 8'
Dedication: “Homage to Ives”
Notes: “Commissioned by the Van Cliburn International Quadrennial Competition, 1973.”
Nonet
Form: Three violins, three violas, and three violoncelli
Date: 1960
First performance: 2 March 1961. Washington, D.C. Nadia Boulanger, cond.
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1962
Timing: 18'
Dedication: “to Nadia Boulanger after forty years of friendship”
Notes: can be played by string orchestra. “Commissioned by the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library in honor of the fiftieth wedding anniversary of Mr. And Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss.”
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O

Of Mice and Men
Form: Film score
Date: 1939
First performance: 16 February 1940. New York
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: Two sections of the score appear in Music for the Movies as “Barley Wagons” and “Threshing Machines.”
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Old American Songs. Set I
Form: Voice and piano (arr. Voice and orchestra)
Date: 1950
First performance: [voice and piano]17 June, 1950. Aldeburgh. Peter Pears, tenor; Benjamin Britten, piano. [voice and orchestra] 7 January 1955. Los Angeles. Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Alfred Wallenstein. Willliam Warfield, baritone
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes.
Date of publication: 1950
Timing: 12'
Contents: I. The Boatmen’s Dance (Minstrel song – 1843) II. The Dodger (Campaign song) III. Long Time Ago (Ballad) IV. Simple Gifts (Shaker song) V. I Bought Me a Cat (Children’s song)
Notes: Copland arranged these songs for voice and small orchestra in 1954. The songs were also published individually “transcribed for chorus” (in various voicings) by Irving Fine in 1952. The song Simple Gifts appears also in Appalachian Spring (and its spinoff Variations on a Shaker Tune); the arrangement in “Old American Songs” is, however, independent. “I Bought Me a Cat” was originally intended for This Tragic Ground
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Old American Songs. Set II
Form: Voice and piano. (Arranged for voice and orchestra)
Date: 1952
First performance: [voice and piano] Ipswich, Massachusetts. William Warfield, baritone; Aaron Copland, piano. [voice and orchestra] 25 May, 1958. Ojai, California. Ojai Festival Orchestra, cond. Aaron Copland. Grace Bumbry, mezzo
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1954
Timing: 13'
Contents: I. The Little Horses (lullaby) II. Zion’s Walls (revivalist song) III. The Golden Willow Tree (Anglo-American ballad) IV. At the River (Hymn tune) V. Ching-A-Ring Chaw (Minstrel song)
Notes: Copland arranged these songs for voice and small orchestra in 1958. “Zion’s Walls” is the basis for the music of The Promise of Living in The Tender Land. No. V was published in choral arrangements (various voicings) by Irving Fine in 1955; nos. I and IV in choral arrangements by Ray Wilding-White in 1965 and 1964 respectively; no. II in choral arrangements by Glenn Koponen in 1982
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Old Poem
Form: Voice and piano
Date: 1920
Text: Arthur Waley, from the Chinese
First performance: 10 January 1922. Paris. Charles Hubbard, singer; Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Editions Maurice Senart
Date of publication: 1923
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Orchestral Variations
Date: 1957
First performance: 5 March 1958. Louisville Orchestra, cond. Robert Whitney
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1960
Timing: 14'
Notes: an orchestration of the Piano Variations
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Our Town
Form: Film
Date: 1940
First performance: 13 June 1940. New York
Publisher: Unpublished as film score
Notes: There are suites for orchestra and for piano link to work0081] drawn from the music to this film. The suites are not identical. The opening of the film, titled “Grovers Corners,” is the fourth movement of Music for the Movies
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Our Town
Form: Orchestral suite
Date: 1940
First performance: 9 June 1940. Columbia Symphony Orchestra, cond. Howard Barlow
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1945
Timing: 11'
Dedication: Leonard Bernstein
Notes: Drawn from the film score. The orchestra suite and the piano suite are not identical: the orchestra suite is in one continuous movement without titles. The opening of the film, titled “Grovers Corners,” is the fourth movement of Music for the Movies
Our Town: Three Piano Excerpts
Date: 1944
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1945
Timing: 7'
Contents: I. Story of Our Town II. Conversation at the Soda Fountain III. The Resting-Place on the Hill
Notes: The orchestra suite and the piano suite are not identical. The opening of the film, retitled “Grovers Corners,” is the fourth movement of Music for the Movies
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P

Passacaglia
Form: Piano
Date: 1922
First performance: January 1923. Paris. XXXX Ericourt, piano
Publisher: Éditions Maurice Senart
Date of publication: 1922
Timing: 6.5'
Dedication: “à Mademoiselle Nadia BOULANGER”
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Pastorale
Form: Voice and piano
Date: 1921
Text: E. Powys Mathers, from the Kafirstani
First performance: 10 January 1922. Charles Hubbard, singer; Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1979
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Petite Portrait (ABE)
Form: Piano
Date: 1921
First performance: Fontainebleau, 21 September 1921. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1981
Notes: originally a fourth “Mood” grouped with the Three Moods. The subject of the portrait is Copland’s school friend Abe Ginsburg; the motive ABE forms the material of the piece
Piano Fantasy
Date: 1955-1957
First performance: 25 October 1957. New York. William Masselos, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1957
Timing: 31'
Dedication: “to the memory of William Kapell”
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Piano Sonata
Date: 1939-1941
First performance: 21 October 1941. Buenos Aires. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1942
Timing: 23'
Dedication: “to Clifford Odets”
Contents: I. Molto moderato II. Vivace III. Andante sostenuto
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Piano Variations
Date: 1930
First performance: 4 January 1931. New York. Aaron Copland
Publisher: Cos Cob Press
Date of publication: 1932
Timing: 11'
Dedication: "to Gerald Sykes."
Notes: orchestrated 1957 as Orchestral Variations. Choreographed by Martha Graham as “Dithyramb.”
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Poet's Song

Form: Voice and piano
Date: 1927
Text: E.E. Cummings
First performance: 11 October, 1935. New York. Ethel Luening, soprano; Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Cos Cob Press
Date of publication: 1935
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Preamble for a Solemn Occasion
Form: Narrator (optional) and orchestra
Date: 1949
Text: Preamble, the United Nations charter
First performance: N.Y. Boston Symphony Orchestra, cond. Leonard Bernstein; Sir Laurence Olivier, narrator
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1953
Timing: 6'
Notes: Copland’s arrangement for band, made in 1973, was published in 1974
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Prelude for Chamber Orchestra
Date: 1924/1928
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1968
Timing: 6'
Dedication: no dedication on published music: presumably “to Nadia Boulanger, with admiration.”
Notes: arranged from the first movement of the Symphony for Organ and Orchestra [link to work0004] / Symphony no. 1 [link to work0005]
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Proclamation for Piano
Date: 1982
First performance: 1983 February 28. Bennett Lerner
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1984
Timing: 3'
Dedication: “to Phillip Ramey”
Notes: published with Mid-Day Thoughts as “Two Piano Pieces.” Orchestrated 1985 by Phillip Ramey as “Proclamation for Orchestra.”
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Q

Quartet for Piano and Strings
Date: 1950
First performance: 29 October 1950. Washington, D.C. New York Piano Quartet
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1952
Timing: 23'
Dedication: “to Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge”
Contents: I. Adagio serio II. Allegro giusto III. Non troppo lento
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Quiet City
Form: Trumpet, English horn, and string orchestra
Date: 1940
First performance: 28 January 1941. New York: Saidenberg Little Symphony, cond. Saidenberg
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1941
Timing: 10'
Dedication: “to Ralph Hawkes.”
Notes: Based on music written in 1939 for Irwin Shaw’s play “Quiet City,” which was withdrawn after two preview performances, the first on April 16, 1939. The music for the play was scored for clarinet, saxophone, trumpet, and piano. The orchestral work is scored for trumpet, English horn, and strings
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R

Rodeo
Form: Ballet
Date: 1942
Scenario: Agnes DeMille
Choreography: Agnes DeMille
First performance: 16 October 1942. New York. Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo
Timing: 24'
Notes: DeMille’s provisional title, “The Courting at Burnt Ranch,” sometimes shows up as a subtitle on programs. Copland prepared an orchestral suite, Four Dance Episodes from Rodeo, in 1942. Correspondence concerning the suite – more performed than the ballet proper and thus more written about – can be accessed through the entry for the suite
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Rondino on the Name Gabriel Fauré
Form: String quartet
Date: 1923-1924
First performance: Fontainebleau. September 1924
Publisher: Unpublished as an individual piece
Date of publication: 4.5'
Notes: this became the first movement of the Two Pieces for String Quartet or String Orchestra. It is one of many pieces written by various composers “sur le nom de Gabriel Fauré”; the Ravel Menuet is the best-known
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S

Scherzo
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1927?
First performance: 4 November 1927. Philadelphia: Philadelphia Orchestra, cond. Carl Reiner
Timing: 7.5'
Notes: A revision of the second movement of the Symphony for Organ and Orchestra, this became absorbed in the revision of the whole work (Symphony no. 1 [link to work0005]
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Sentimental Melody (Slow Dance)
Form: Piano
Date: 1926
First performance: 1927 Ampico piano roll. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Scott
Date of publication: 1929
Timing: 2'
Notes: of the 1926 suite Five sentimental melodies this is the only one published under this title. Within the Five it was titled “Blues no. 1"
Sextet for piano, clarinet, and string quartet
Date: 1937
First performance: 26 February 1939. New York
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1948
Timing: 15'
Dedication: Carlos Chávez
Contents: I. Allegro vivace (in a bold rhythmic style throughout) II. Lento III. Finale: precise and rhythmic
Notes: An arrangement of the Short Symphony. The scoring reflects the scoring of the Roy Harris Concerto for Piano, Clarinet, and String Quartet of 1926
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Shaker Variations
Form: Band
Date: 1956
First performance: 2 March, 1958. Evanston, Illinois. Northwestern University Band, cond. Aaron Copland.
Timing: 4'
Notes: an arrangement of the “Simple Gifts” section of Appalachian Spring.
Short Symphony
Date: 1933
First performance: 23 November 1934. Mexico City. Orquésta Sinfónica de México, cond. Carlos Chávez
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1955
Timing: 15'
Dedication: "to Carlos Chávez."
Contents: I. Quarter-note = 144 (incisivo) II. Half-note = circa 44 III. Quarter-note = 144 (preciso e ritmico)
Notes: arranged as Sextet for piano, clarinet & string quartet, 1937. This is Symphony no. 2
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Signature for the High-Low Concerts
Form: Chamber orchestra
Date: 1938
Publisher: Unpublished
Publisher: Unpublished
Timing: ca. 2'
Notes: Opening fanfare for Vernon Duke’s series of “High-Low Concerts.” The music was reused in An Outdoor Overture
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Signature: CBS Playhouse
Form: Television score
Date: 1966
Publisher: Unpublished
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: for brass, percussion, and strings
Something Wild
Form: Film score
Date: 1961
First performance: 23 December 1961, New York
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: Music for a Great City is an orchestral suite drawn from this music
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Sonata for Violin and Piano
Date: 1943
First performance: 17 January 1944. New York. Ruth Posselt, violin; Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1944
Timing: 17'
Dedication: “to Lieutenant Harry H. Dunham, 1910-1943."
Contents: I. Andante semplice / Più mosso II. Lento III. Allegretto giusto
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Statements
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1934
First performance: 7 January 1942. New York. New York Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Dimitri Mitropoulos
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1947
Timing: 19'
Dedication: "to Mary Senior Churchill."
Contents: I. Militant. Quarter = 112 II. Cryptic. Quarter = ca. 88 III. Dogmatic. Quarter = 128-132 IV. Subjective. Calmo, espressivo (quarter = ca. 56) V. Jingo. Half = 132 VI. Prophetic. Quarter = 50
Notes: The middle section of the third movement, “Dogmatic,” quotes thematic material from the Piano Variations. The fourth movement, “Subjective,” uses material from the Elegies [link to work0066] for violin and viola. The final two movements were performed well before the premiere of the work as a whole, on 9 January 1936 by the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy
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String Quartet (1968)
Date: 1968
Notes: Copland's final twelve-tone work, extant as sketches only
Sunday Afternoon Music
Form: Piano
Date: 1935
First performance: 24 February 1936. New York. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Carl Fischer
Date of publication: 1936
Timing: 2'
Symphonic Ode
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1927-1929
First performance: (original version) 19 February 1932. Boston: Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky conducting. (revised version) 3 February 1956. Boston: Boston Symphony Orchestra, cond. Charles Munch
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1957
Timing: 19'
Notes: revised 1955
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Symphony for Organ and Orchestra
Date: 1924
First performance: 11 January 1925: New York. New York Symphony Orchestra, cond. Walter Damrosch. Nadia Boulanger, organ
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1963
Timing: 25'
Dedication: "To Nadia Boulanger - with admiration"
Contents: I. Prelude: Andante II. Scherzo: Allegretto III. Finale: Lento; Più mosso: Allegro moderato
Notes: Revised as Symphony no. 1; scherzo of revision had briefly an independent life as Scherzo; first movement arranged as Prelude for Chamber Orchestra
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Symphony no. 1
Date: 1927-1928
First performance: December 1931. Berlin: Berlin Symphony Orchestra, cond. Ernest Ansermet
Publisher: Cos Cob press
Date of publication: 1931
Timing: 19'
Dedication: “Dedicated to Nadia Boulanger, with admiration”
Contents: I. Prelude: Andante II. Scherzo: Molto allegro III. Finale: Lento /Più mosso: Allegro moderato
Notes: revision of Symphony for Organ and Orchestra. The Scherzo of the revision was performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra under Carl Reiner in 1927. The first movement was arranged as Prelude for Chamber Orchestra
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T

The Cat and the Mouse: Scherzo humoristique
Form: Piano
Date: 1920
First performance: 23 September 1921. Paris. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Durand & Cie.
Date of publication: 1921
Timing: 3'
Notes: the current subtitle of the piece, "Scherzo humoristique," seems to have been its original title, and "The Cat and the Mouse" the subtitle
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The City
Form: Film score
Date: 1939
First performance: 1939, New York World’s Fair
Publisher: Unpublished as a film score
Notes: two sections of the film were included in Music for the Movies as “New England Countryside” and “Sunday Traffic.”
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The Cummington Story
Form: Film score
Date: 1945
Publisher: Unpublished
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: a production of the U.S. Office of War Information. An except from this score was published as a piano solo under the title In Evening Air
The Heiress
Form: Film score
Date: 1949
First performance: 6 October 1949, New York
Publisher: Unpublished
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The House on the Hill
Form: Unaccompanied women's chorus
Date: 1925
Text: Edwin Arlington Robinson; from Children of the Night
First performance: 24 April 1925. New York. Women’s University Glee Club, cond. Gerald Reynolds
Publisher: E.C. Schirmer
Date of publication: 1926
Timing: 5'
Dedication: “to Thomas Whitney Surette”
Notes: often grouped with (but seldom performed with) An Immorality as “Two Choruses.”
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The North Star
Form: Film score
Date: 1943
Script: Lillian Hellman
Lyrics: Ira Gershwin
First performance: 4 November 1943
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: The following excerpts from the film were published: “Song of the Guerrillas;” “The Younger Generation;” “ No Village Like Mine.” (The first two were published both as solo songs and as choral numbers, the last as a solo song only.) This film was re-released in the 1950s, shorn of its earlier scenes, as “Armored Attack.”
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The Red Pony (film)
Form: Film score
Date: 1948
First performance: 8 March 1949
Publisher: Unpublished
Notes: Copland made an orchestral suite from this film in 1948
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The Red Pony (orchestral suite)
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1948
First performance: 30 October 1948. Houston Symphony Orchestra, cond. Efrem Kurtz
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1951
Timing: 24'
Dedication: “to Erik Johns”
Contents: I. Morning on the Ranch II. The Gift III. Dream March and Circus Music IV. Walk to the Bunkhouse V. Grandfather’s Story VI. Happy Ending
Notes: excerpts from the film score Copland thought of calling this “Children’s Suite from The Red Pony.” Correspondence relating to the film may be accessed through the entry on the film score
The Second Hurricane
Form: Opera
Words: Edwin Denby
First performance: 21 April 1937. New York, Henry Street Settlement Music School, cond. Lehman Engel
Publisher: C.C. Birchard
Date of publication: 1938
Timing: 90'
Dedication: “to Victor and Rudi and Germaine and Ruth and also Paul and Virgil”
Notes: the finale, “That’s the Idea of Freedom,” was also published separately
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The Tender Land
Form: Opera
Date: 1954
Text: “Horace Everett” (Erik Johns)
First performance: 1 April 1954. New York. New York City Opera Company, cond. Thomas Schippers
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1956
Timing: 100'
Notes: Copland prepared an orchestral suite from the opera in 1957-1958 Other material from the opera published separately are: “The Promise of Living” in a version for five-part chorus; “Stomp Your Foot” for chorus and piano; and “Laurie’s Song” (“Once I Thought”) for voice and piano. The music of The Promise of Living is based on Zion’s Walls from Old American Songs, Set II
The Tender Land
Form: Orchestral suite
Date: 1958
First performance: 10 April 1958. Chicago Symphony Orchestra, cond. Fritz Reiner
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1960
Timing: 21'
Contents: I. Introduction and Love Music II. Party Scene III. Finale: The Promise of Living
Notes: The music of “The Promise of Living” is based on Zion’s Walls from Old American Songs, Set II
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The World of Nick Adams
Form: Television score
Date: 1957
First performance: 10 November 1957. Cond. Alfredo Antonini
Publisher: Unpublished
The Young Pioneers
Form: Piano
Date: 1935
First performance: 24 February 1936. New York. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Carl Fischer
Date of publication: 1936
Timing: 1'
Third Symphony
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1944-1946
First performance: 18 October 1946. Boston Symphony Orchestra, cond. Serge Koussevitzky
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1947
Timing: 42'
Dedication: “Dedicated to the memory of my dear friend Natalie Koussevitzky.”
Contents: I. Molto moderato – with simple expression II. Allegro molto III. Andantino quasi allegretto IV. Molto deliberato / Doppio movimento (Allegro risoluto)
Notes: the introduction to the fourth movement incorporates the Fanfare for the Common Man
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Three Latin-American Sketches
Form: Orchestra
Date: 1971
First performance: 7 June 1972. New York Philharmonic Orchestra, cond. Andre Kostelanetz
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1975
Timing: 10'
Contents: I. Estribillo II. Paisaje Mexicano III. Danza de Jalisco
Notes: an expansion of Two Mexican Pieces. Copland describes the orchestra – single winds, but at least six first violins – as “small orchestra” rather than “chamber orchestra.”
Three Moods
Form: Piano
Date: 1920-1921
First performance: Fontainebleau, 21 September 1921. Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1981
Contents: I. Embittered II. Wistful III. Jazzy
Notes: Originally Four Moods, with Petite Portrait (ABE)
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Threnody No. 1: Igor Stravinsky in Memoriam
Form: Flute and string trio
Date: 1971
Publisher: Tempo magazine, no 98
Publisher: Tempo magazine, no 98
Date of publication: 1972
Timing: 2'
Threnody No. 2: Beatrice Cunningham in Memoriam
Form: Alto flute and string trio
Date: 1973
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1977
Timing: 4'
Tragic Ground
Form: Musical
Date: 1945
Publisher: Unfinished
Publisher: Unfinished
Notes: Despite the title, Caldwell’s novel is a comedy. Tragic Ground is the source of “I Bought Me a Cat” from Old American Songs, Set I and of the version of Zion’s Walls in Old American Songs, Set II. It was also drawn on for music for The Red Pony, The Tender Land and Dance Panels
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Twelve Poems of Emily Dickinson
Form: Voice and piano
Date: 1949-1950
Text: Emily Dickinson
First performance: 18 May 1950. New York Alice Howland, soprano; Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1951
Timing: 28'
Dedication: “to twelve composer friends” as follows: I. “To David Diamond.” II. “To Elliott Carter.” III. “To Ingolf Dahl.” IV. “To Alexei Haieff.” V. “To Marcelle de Manziarly.” VI. “To Juan Orrego Salas.” VII. “To Irving Fine.” VIII. “To Harold Shapero.” IX. “To Camargo Guarnieri.” X. “To Alberto Ginastera.” XI. “To Lukas Foss.” XII. “To Arthur Berger.”
Contents: I. Nature, the gentlest mother II. There came a wind like a bugle III. Why do they shut me out of Heaven? IV. The world feels dusty V. Heart, we will forget him VI. Dear March, come in! VII. Sleep is supposed to be VIII. When they come back IX. I felt a funeral in my brain X. I’ve heard an organ talk sometimes XI. Going to Heaven! XII. The Chariot
Notes: Eight of the poems – 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 11, and 12 – were orchestrated by Copland in the years between 1958 and 1970. When performed as a group they go under the title “Eight Poems of Emily Dickinson.”
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Two Ballads for Violin and Piano
Date: 1957
Publisher: Unpublished
Publisher: Unpublished
Dedication: “To Verna Fine”
Contents: I. Half-note = circa 60. Simple and direct II. Quarter-note = circa 80
Notes: realized by Bennett Lerner and Phillip Ramey from sketches
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Two Mexican Pieces
Form: Chamber orchestra
Date: 1959
First performance: July 1959, Spoleto (second movement only)
Publisher: Boosey & Hawkes
Date of publication: 1968
Contents: I. Paisaje Mexicano II. Danza de Jalisco
Notes: expanded as Three Latin-American Sketches in 1971. “Danza de Jalisco” was arranged by the composer for two pianos in 1963
Two Pieces for String Quartet or String Orchestra
Date: 1923-1924, 1928
First performance: (string quartet): 6 May 1928. N.Y., Lennox Quartet; (string orchestra): 14 December 1928. Boston. Boston Symphony Orchestra, cond. Serge Koussevitzky
Publisher: Arrow Music Press
Date of publication: 1940
Timing: 11'
Contents: I. Lento molto II. Rondino on the name Gabriel Fauré
Notes: the Rondino on the Name Gabriel Fauré was written in 1923-1924 and was performed as an independent piece at Fontainebleau in September 1924
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Two Pieces for Violin and Piano
Date: 1926
First performance: 5 May 1926. Paris. Samuel Dushkin, violin; Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: B. Schott's Söhne
Date of publication: 1928
Timing: 9'
Dedication: I.: "To Israel Citkowitz." II. "To Samuel Dushkin."
Contents: I. Nocturne II. Ukelele Serenade
Notes: Like many other people, Copland misspells “ukulele.”
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V

Vitebsk: Study on a Jewish Theme for Piano, Violin and Violoncello
Principle medium: Chamber music
Other medium: Piano; Violin; Folk music
Date: 1929
First performance: 16 February 1929. New York: Walter Gieseking, Adolphe Onnou, Robert Maas
Timing: 11'
Dedication: "to Roy Harris."
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Vocalise-Étude
Form: Voice and piano
Date: 1928
Text: vocalise
First performance: 11 October, 1935. New York. Ethel Luening, soprano; Aaron Copland, piano
Publisher: Alphonse Leduc
Date of publication: 1929
Timing: 4'
Notes: This is one of a series of Vocalises-Études commissioned by A.L. Hettich, teacher at the Paris Conservatoire. The best-known of these is the Ravel Étude in forme de habanera.
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W

What Do We Plant?
Form: Two-part treble-voice chorus and piano
Date: 1936
Text: Henry Abbey
Publisher: Boosey & Co.
Publisher: Boosey & Co.
Date of publication: 1941
Timing: 2.5'
Notes: “Two-part chorus for junior high school”
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