Concerts from the American Folklife Center, Library of Congress, 2013-2014

MAY 28, 2015 at Noon, No Tickets Required

Ara Dinkjian Zulal

Coolidge Auditorium

For more information about Homegrown Concerts and other AFC events, call the Folklife Research Center at (202) 707-5510, or email [email protected].

Ara Dinkjian is an American born artist who grew up with traditional Armenian music. His earliest professional musical experience was accompanying his father Onnik Dinkjian, a renowned Armenian folk and liturgical singer. Ara learned several western and eastern instruments (piano, guitar, dumbeg, clarinet) and in 1980 graduated from the Hartt College of Music, earning the country’s first and only special degree in the instrument for which he has become most well-known, the oud. For over forty years, he served as organist in the Armenian Apostolic Church. Throughout his musical life, Ara has continued to develop his highly personal compositional style which blends his eastern and western roots. In 1985, to help realize these compositions and musical concepts, Ara formed his instrumental quartet, Night Ark, which recorded four CDs for RCA/BMG and Universal/PolyGram. Night Ark’s recordings and concert tours were highly influential for musicians and music lovers throughout the world because they demonstrated how music can be progressive and creative while still retaining the dignity and soul of one’s culture.

In Armenian, Zulal means “clear water.” Zulal, the New York-based a cappella trio, takes Armenia’s village folk melodies and weaves intricate arrangements that pay tribute to the rural roots of the music while introducing contemporary lyricism and energy. Zulal’s singers, Teni Apelian, Yeraz Markarian and Anaïs Tekerian have been singing together since 2002. The trio celebrates the trials and joys of old Armenian village life: Budding romances in elevated gardens, the disappointments of hapless suitors, secret messages placed upon the western winds, the moonlit faces of shepherd boys and their brides... These are the searing impressions of the past that come to life in Zulal's arrangements, reminders of a simpler past, tokens of comfort in the complex, modern world. The group has two albums, Zulal (2004), and Notes to a Crane (2012).

This concert is co-sponsored with the Library of Congress African Middle East Division.

HOMEGROWN CONCERTS
A free noon concert series presented by the American Folklife Center and the Music Division of the Library of Congress. All concerts are held in the Coolidge Auditorium (located on the Ground Floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress) or the Whittall Pavilion (next to the Coolidge, on the Ground Floor, Jefferson Building). Presented in Partnership with the Kennedy Center Millennium Stage. NO TICKETS REQUIRED.