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A flute may warble in the contemporary comical sense or may warble resoundingly, with all the dignity and majesty appropriate to the presence of a saint or an emperor.  Depictions of flutes warbling in this latter sense are depicted in scenes shown in Das Weisskunigs Erfahrung in Mummerei (Of the White King’s Introduction to Mummery), from the Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I’s autobiographical and allegorical Weisskunig cycle, and the Triumph of David, taken from the Encomium Musices (In Praise of Music) collection of musical scenes in the Bible. This “Warble” section illustrates the emergence of transverse, or side blown, flutes in a wide range of surroundings.

Michael Praetorius’s 1619 work, Syntagmatis Musici Tomus Secundus De Organographia (Second Volume of Musicology on Instrumentation) reproduced on this wall), includes the earliest extant representation of a transverse flute made in two pieces.  Later in the seventeenth century flutes were made of three or four pieces, and still later of five pieces.  The jointed flute was adopted for several reasons: for convenience in manufacture, for portability of the instrument when packed in its case, and for the purpose of adjusting the pitch.

Syntagmatis Musici Tomus Secundus De Organographia; Theatrum Instrumentorum seu Sciagraphia; Tomus Tertius (Second Volume of Musicology on Instrumentation; The Theatre of the Instruments or Sketches; Third Volume).

Michael Praetorius’s comprehensive early work on musical instruments contains, as Miller described, “forty-four plates giving illustrations of one hundred and eight-eight instruments of all kinds, including recorders and transverse flutes.”

Syntagmatis Musici Tomus Secundus De Organographia; Theatrum Instrumentorum seu Sciagraphia; Tomus Tertius (Second Volume of Musicology on Instrumentation; TheTheatre of the Instruments or Sketches; Third Volume). Michael Praetorius (German, ca. 1571–1621). Wolfenbüttel: Elias Holwein, 1619. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (031.00.00)
[Digital ID # fl0031p1]

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Whistle

The body of this whistle may be opened and water may be added in order to create a “warbling” effect when blown.

Whistle. Unknown, Lucerne, Switzerland. Twentieth century. Maple. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (032.00.00)
[Digital ID # 0626af1]

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Transverse (or side-blown) Flute in C

Transverse (or side-blown) Flute in C. Peter Bressan (French, 1663–1731). London, 1688–1730. Boxwood, stained brown, ivory cap and ferrules. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (033.01.00)
[Digital ID # 1207f1]

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Das Weisskunigs Erfahrung in Mummerei (Of the White King’s Introduction to Mummery)

Das Weisskunigs Erfahrung in Mummerei (Of the White King’s Introduction to Mummery). Hans Burgkmair, the elder (German, 1473–ca. 1531), ca. 1514–1516, printed in eighteenth century. Woodcut. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (036.00.00)
[Digital ID # fl0036]

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“The Triumph of David” from Encomium Musices (In Praise of Music)

“The Triumph of David” from Encomium Musices (In Praise of Music). Unknown (Flemish, 1523–1605). Late-sixteenth to early-seventeenth century. Engraving. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (039.00.00)
[Digital ID # fl0039]

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“Ste. Cécile” (Saint Cecilia)

“Ste. Cécile” (Saint Cecilia). Jacques Bouillard (French, 1747–1806). Eighteenth century. Etching and engraving. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (035.01.00)
[Digital ID # fl0035]

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L’Aimable Accord (The Pleasant Harmony)

L’Aimable Accord (The Pleasant Harmony). Elisabeth Claire Tardieu, née Tournay (French, 1731–1773), after Jean François de Troy (French, 1679–1752). Eighteenth century. Etching and engraving. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (040.01.00)
[Digital ID # fl0040]

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Drei Flötenspieler (Three Flute Players)

Drei Flötenspieler (Three Flute Players). Possibly Andries Pauli, or Pauwels, le vieux (the elder) (Flemish, 1600–1639). Seventeenth century. Drypoint. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (037.01.00)
[Digital ID # fl0037]

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Flute Player

Flute Player. Lucas Vorsterman I (Flemish, 1595–1675), ca. 1640. Engraving. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (038.01.00)
[Digital ID # fl0038_01]

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[An order for the appointment of a certain Pierre Piech, as player of the flutist and flageolettist of his chamber.]

[An order for the appointment of a certain Pierre Piech, as player of the flutist and flageolettist of his chamber.]. King Louis XIV (French, 1638–1715). 1655. Holograph letter. Dayton C. Miller Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (041.01.00)
[Digital ID # fl0041]

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