Country Music Takes a Bow

Like so much that is American, the roots of country music are found in a veritable melting pot of different influences and styles. Rising from the rural regions of the American south, it owes much to western (or cowboy) music, as well as the influence of African American blues. ASCAP writer Garth Brooks (b. 1962) received the ASCAP Golden Note Award presented by then-President Marilyn Bergman at a gala program in the Russell Senate Office Building on March 12, 2002.

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  • ASCAP Celebrates Garth Brooks on Capitol Hill. Program, 2002. ASCAP Foundation Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (028.00.00)
    [Digital ID # as0028]

  • Garth Brooks and ASCAP President Marilyn Bergman. Photograph. Focused Images Photography, Inc., © 2002. ASCAP Foundation Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (027.00.00)
    [Digital ID # as0027]

Lyle Lovett on Capitol Hill

Composer and performer Lyle Lovett (b. 1957) has long been a passionate advocate of the goals established by ASCAP and is a familiar face in the reading rooms and on stage at the Library of Congress.

Lyle Lovett signing autographs in the Library of Congress, March 15, 2012. Reproduction. ASCAP Foundation Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (014.00.00)
[Digital ID # as0014]

An American Melting Pot—the Carolina Chocolate Drops

Combining elements of "old-time music" with blues, mountain, and country influences, the Carolina Chocolate Drops produce a fusion of these forms, all while highlighting the distinctive hand that African Americans have played in American music. The Carolina Chocolate Drops exemplify the great "melting pot" tradition found in American arts. ASCAP from its earliest days to the present ensures that music creators working in all forms are fairly compensated.

Carolina Chocolate Drops. Photograph, ca. 2007. ASCAP Foundation Collection, Music Division, Library of Congress (033.00.00)
[Digital ID # as0033]

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