This 1902 illustration of a young dryad (or wood nymph) balanced in treetop branches shows the side of nature that few venture into: the mysterious and undisturbed nighttime. The story "Our Tree Top Library" explores aspects of nature at night, when everything hidden comes out to investigate, and the silent peace of those who coexist in the woods is no longer interrupted by the mundane concerns of everyday.

So haunted at night with bat and owl and ghostly moth, ca. 1902. Charcoal on board. Published in Harper's Magazine, March 1902. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. LC-USZ62-128611 ; LC-USZC4-6328 (10) Gift of Mrs. Henry H. Bonnell

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Historians, scientists, professors, and artists alike were captivated by the predicted appearance of Halley's comet in 1910. Though the majority of artists recreated an image of the comet in 1910, Green created this charcoal drawing in 1909 at the height of anticipation. In this simple, yet majestic scene, the artist imaginatively captures the essence of the scientific phenomenon that enraptured the public.

Halley's comet at dawn, 1909. Charcoal on board. Published in Harper's Weekly, May 21, 1910. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. LC-USZ62-128613 ; LC-USZC4-9400 (12)

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