American Treasures of the Library of Congress: Reason

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A Selection of Almanacs

Davy Crockett's Almanack of Wild Sports in the West, and Life in the Backwoods: Calculated for All the States in the Union.
Davy Crockett's Almanack of Wild Sports in the West, and Life in the Backwoods: Calculated for All the States in the Union
.
Nashville, TN: 1836
Rare Book & Special Collection Division
(109.9)

Kikinawadendamoiwewin or Almanac, wa aiongin obiboniman debeniminang Iesos, 1834.
Kikinawadendamoiwewin or Almanac, wa aiongin obiboniman debeniminang Iesos
, 1834. Bodjiwikwed or Green Bay: [1833?]
Rare Book & Special Collection Division (111.7)

Hoch-deutsch americanische Calendar, auf das Jahr 1750
Hoch-deutsch americanische Calendar, auf das Jahr 1750

Germantown, Pennsylvania: Christopher Saur, 1750.
Rare Book & Special Collection Division (221.1)

 

The Library's American Almanac Collection is strongest in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century material. These volumes contain astronomical and meteorological data for a given year and often include a miscellany of other information. Almanacs were printed in virtually every American town that had a printing press and were found in homes where the only other book was a Bible. American almanacs were published in a wide variety of languages including Chippewa, Cherokee, Hawaiian and other tribal languages, as well the major European languages. In the nineteenth-century special interest almanacs issued by political parties, religious groups, labor organizations, and business promoters emerged as powerful propaganda tools. At this time comic almanacs, such as Davy Crockett's Almanack, also appeared and became the forerunners of modern comics and joke books.

The House-keeper's Almanac, or The Young Wife's Oracle, for 1842.
The House-keeper's Almanac, or The Young Wife's Oracle, for 1842.

New York: Elton, 1842
Rare Book & Special Collection Division (110A)

The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, for 1838, being the second after Bisextile or Leap Year, and the 62nd of American Independence.
The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, for 1838, being the second after Bisextile or Leap Year, and the 62nd of American Independence
.
Adapted to most parts of the United States. N. Southard, ed. vol. I, no. 3.
Boston: D.K. Hitchcock, 1838
Rare Book & Special Collection Division
(110B)

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