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  • Stevie Wonder Discusses Library Commission "Sketches of a Life"

    Stevie Wonder talks to Norman Middleton of the Library's Music Division about his new Library of Congress commission, "Sketches of a Life," and his thoughts about composition and music.

    • Contributor: Wonder, Stevie
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2009-02-24
  • Jonathan Larson: The Man Who Died Too Young

    Mark Horowitz discusses the life and work of Jonathan Larson, composer of the hit musical "Rent."

    • Contributor: Horowitz, Mark
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2011-05-09
  • The New Deal Legacy and Contemporary Scholarship, Part 2

    The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just ...

    • Contributor: Various - Brannan, Beverly W. - Birney, Alice L. (Alice Lotvin) - Breiseth, Christopher Neri - Camp, Charles - Clark, Robert William - Cleary, Beth M. - Cole, John Young - Dimunation, Mark G. - Gottesman, Laura - Kalin, Andrea - Katzman, Laura - Kazin, Michael - Kerst, Catherine Hiebert - McDannell, Colleen - Morgan, Mindy J. - Peatross, C. Ford - Rachleff, Peter J. - Remsberg, Rich - Sapoznik, Henry - Tidwell, John Edgar - Wiltsey, Tom - Zvonchenko, Walter - American Folklife Center - Archive of Folk Culture (Library of Congress) - Library of Congress - National New Deal Preservation Association - United States. National Archives and Records Administration
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-03-14
  • Stevie Wonder Performs "Sketches of a Life"

    Singer/songwriter Stevie Wonder, the awardee of the second Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, premieres "Sketches of a Life," a sprawling, hybrid pop-classical concerto, written between 1976 and 1994. The work was unveiled through a commission for the Library of Congress in the Coolidge Auditorium.

    • Contributor: Wonder, Stevie
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2009-02-23
  • Dvorak in the New World

    For the first time in more than a century, Antonin Dvorak's original manuscript for Symphony No. 9, "From the New World," returned to the United States for a special one-day display at the Library of Congress. Dvorak scholar Michael Beckerman speaks on the role of African-American sources in the composer's conception of an American music. Eva Velicka joins him for a discussion on "Manuscripts ...

    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2011-10-01
  • Interview with Composer and Pianist Fred Hersch

    Part of the series "American Creativity: The Composer-Performer," this interview with the composer and pianist Fred Hersch, one of a series of portraits of major jazz figures appearing at the Library of Congress, was presented by the Library's Music Division as a pre-concert presentation. The interviewer is Ben Roe.

    • Contributor: Hersch, Fred
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2007-10-26
  • Danny Kaye Website Launch

    At an evening celebration on March 19, the Library launched a website featuring 2,000 items from its Danny Kaye and Sylvia Fine Collection.

    • Contributor: Speakers, Various
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2013-03-19
  • Dipper Mouth Blues

    Thomas Brothers discusses Louis Armstrong, composer of King Oliver's "Dipper Mouth Blues."

    • Contributor: Thomas Brothers
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2012-03-29
  • Gershwin Prize Gala Dinner

    Paul Simon receives the first annual Gershwin Prize for Popular Song during a gala dinner sponsored by the Library's Music Division.

    • Contributor: Various
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2007-05-22
  • Samuel Barber: Serendipitous Discoveries

    Barbara Heyman discussed the life and music of American composer Samuel Barber (1910-1981), focusing on how inscriptions and quotations on primary source material reveal striking aspects of his compositional approach. Heyman shed light on recent discoveries including Barber's music manuscripts, sketches and correspondence. The Library of Congress is the preeminent repository for manuscripts by Barber. The composer's Hermit Songs, op. 29 were commissioned by ...

    • Contributor: Heyman, Barbara
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2012-10-02
  • Rodgers & Hammerstein: "Getting to Know You" & South Pacific

    In the seventh episode of a series of videos that explore the Rodgers and Hammerstein collections at the Library of Congress, Michael Feinstein and Mark Eden Horowitz share the discovery that "Getting to Know You" from The King and I originated as unused songs from South Pacific, "Suddenly Lucky" and "Suddenly Lovely." Produced by special arrangement with Imagem/Williamson Music Inc.

    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2014-02-03
  • The Musical Worlds of Victor Herbert: A Conversation with Alyce Mott

    Victor Herbert is the grandfather of American musical theater, founder of the organization that protects the rights of composers (ASCAP), and the creator of some of America's best loved classics. He set the stage for the legendary creators of Broadway, making the work of Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hammerstein, and Stephen Sondheim possible.

    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2012-12-03
  • A Fiddler's Tale

    Annette Kaufman, pianist and art collector, discussed "A Fiddler's Tale: How Hollywood and Vivaldi Discovered Me," a book she co-wrote with her husband, violinist and art collector Louis Kaufman.

    • Contributor: Kaufman, Annette
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2003-07-31
  • Rodgers & Hammerstein: Carousel

    In the sixth episode of a series of videos that explore the Rodgers and Hammerstein collections at the Library of Congress, Michael Feinstein examines the origins of the opening number from the hit musical Carousel, "Carousel Waltz." Produced by special arrangement with Imagem/Williamson Music Inc.

    • Contributor: Feinstein, Michael
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2014-01-03
  • Seeger Tribute: Welcome, Introduction and Keynote Address

    The Library of Congress celebrated the musical legacy of the Seeger Family during a two-day program, sponsored by the American Folklife Center, titled "How Can I Keep from Singing? A Seeger Family Tribute." Neil Rosenberg, professor emeritus at Memorial University of Newfoundland, delivered the keynote address titled "Family Values, Seeger Style." In his lecture, Rosenberg discussed the underlying forces, motifs and themes that recurred ...

    • Contributor: Rosenberg, Neil
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2007-03-16
  • Conversation with the Elias String Quartet

    Donald Grant, violin, and Martin Saving, viola, of the Elias Quartet, discuss their work and the music of Haydn, Kurtag, and Beethoven.

    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2014-03-07
  • "Taps" and Gen. Daniel Butterfield

    In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of "Taps," Nicholas Brown (a descendant of General Daniel Butterfield, who arranged the military call) explores the origin and history of America's bugle call and the man behind it. Special appearances by Master Sergeant Allyn Van Patten, principal special bugler for U.S. Army Band "Pershing's Own," and Jari Villanueva, director, Taps for Veterans. Presented in conjunction with the ...

    • Contributor: Brown, Nicholas A.
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2013-12-16
  • Irving Fine & the American Woodwind Quintet

    Nicholas Alexander Brown discusses Irving Fine and the American Woodwind Quintet as part of the Library's celebration of the composer's 100th birthday Irving Fine, described by Aaron Copland as "the greatest of us all." A leading voice in the American Neoclassical School, Fine was a member of the Boston Group of composers--Arthur Berger, Leonard Bernstein, Aaron Copland, Lukas Foss and Harold Shapero--who were key ...

    • Contributor: Brown, Nicholas Alexander
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2014-12-02
  • Poets & Patriotism: The 200th Birthday of the Star-Spangled Banner

    Internationally-renowned baritone Thomas Hampson presented a special program commemorating the 200th anniversary of our national anthem. The program included American music from colonial days to the present, rare historical documents from the Library's extensive collections. Hampson was joined by the University of Michigan Alumni Chorus, Mark Clague (University of Michigan) and pianist Matthew Thompson.

    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2014-07-03
  • New Deal Resources: Preserving the Legacy, Part 1

    The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just ...

    • Contributor: Various - Brannan, Beverly W. - Birney, Alice L. (Alice Lotvin) - Breiseth, Christopher Neri - Camp, Charles - Clark, Robert William - Cleary, Beth M. - Cole, John Young - Dimunation, Mark G. - Gottesman, Laura - Kalin, Andrea - Katzman, Laura - Kazin, Michael - Kerst, Catherine Hiebert - McDannell, Colleen - Morgan, Mindy J. - Peatross, C. Ford - Rachleff, Peter J. - Remsberg, Rich - Sapoznik, Henry - Tidwell, John Edgar - Wiltsey, Tom - Zvonchenko, Walter - American Folklife Center - Archive of Folk Culture (Library of Congress) - Library of Congress - National New Deal Preservation Association - United States. National Archives and Records Administration
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-03-13
  • Tchaikovsky & Taneyev: Mentor and Protege

    Set within the artistic milieu of the last decades of Imperial Russia, this presentation traces the lives and careers of two of that country's most influential composers: Petr Il'ich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893), and his student Sergei Ivanovich Taneyev (1856-1915) -- the former having enjoyed a worldwide celebrity during his lifetime, and the latter's reputation having been eclipsed to some degree by his more famous mentor, ...

    • Contributor: Lavine, Kevin
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2011-05-13
  • After Pearl Harbor: Music, War and the Library of Congress

    The Music Division of the Library of Congress and the American Musicological Society, in joint partnership, presented the second in a series of lectures highlighting musicological research conducted in the division's collections. Annegret Fauser discussed "After Pearl Harbor: Music, War and the Library of Congress."

    • Contributor: Fauser, Annegret
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2008-09-18
  • David Schoenbaum: The Violin

    David Schoenbaum talks about his new book, "The Violin: A Social History of the World's Most Versatile Instrument."

    • Contributor: Shoenbaum, David
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2012-12-18
  • Wagner in America

    Alex Ross returns to his native Washington, D.C., in this afternoon symposium on Wagner connections to American culture.

    • Contributor: Ross, Alex
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2013-11-23
  • Dear Dorothy: Letters from Nicolas Slonimsky to Dorothy Adlow

    Electra Slonimsky Yourke talks with the Library's Kevin LaVine about "Dear Dorothy: Letters from Nicolas Slonimsky to Dorothy Adlow," a new collection of letters by her father -- musicologist, conductor and composer Nicolas Slonimsky.

    • Contributor: Yourke, Electra Slonimsky
    • Original Format: Film, Video
    • Date: 2013-11-07