skip navigation  The Library of Congress >> Research Centers
AFC Logo
The American Folklife Center
Connect with us:   Blog Blog  |  Facebook Facebook  |  Podcasts Podcasts   RSS RSS  | Video Webcasts
A - Z Index
 home >> Civil Rights History Project >> Survey of Collections and Repositories >> Collections >> Collection Record

The Civil Rights History Project: Survey of Collections and Repositories

Notable New Yorkers collection

Repository: Columbia University. Center for Oral History

Collection Description (CRHP): Of the ten interviews included in this collection, four are relevant to the civil rights movement. They include:
Kenneth Clark, a psychologist, educator, and social reformer who dedicated his life to the cause of racial justice. His groundbreaking studies on race and child development helped end segregation in the United States. He also founded the Northside Center for Child Development in Harlem. Clark was the first African American to join the New York Board of Regents and to serve as president of the American Psychological Association.
Mamie Phipps Clark, a psychologist and activist who conducted groundbreaking studies on race and child development that helped end segregation in the United States. She also founded the Northside Center for Child Development in Harlem, which has eased that community through social, educational, and psychological changes for half a century.
Moe Foner, a nationally renowned activist who dedicated his life to union struggles. He founded an influential cultural arts program, Bread and Roses, which brought together artists and activists to publicize the cause of workers, and added an artistic dimension to union workers' lives beyond earning their "daily bread."
John Bertram Oakes, editor of the New York Times editorial page from 1961 to 1976, was the creator of the contemporary op-ed page, featuring the opinions of both the newspaper and external writers. Under his guidance, the Times editorials moved from cautiously worded dispassionate views to more rousing, liberal calls for social change, particularly for ending the war in Vietnam, promoting civil rights, and protecting the environment. Through his Times environmental editorials, Oakes became a key coalescing force in the modern environmental movement.

Collection Description (Extant): The Notable New Yorkers Collection and website offers audio recordings and transcripts of interviews with ten influential New Yorkers, drawn from the collections of the Oral History Research Office of the Columbia University Libraries. These interviews, conducted by the Office between 1955 and 2001, open an imaginative portal into twentieth-century New York City and the ways in which it has deeply affected the culture and history of the United States and the world beyond. With three background essays and a briefer methodological introduction for each oral history, this site also provides a revealing look at the art of the biographical interview- a methodology developed by the Office over its four and a half decades of existence- in which individuals who have shaped history reflect upon their lives and accomplishments.

Access Copy Note: Transcripts and audio are available online at the collection website.

Collection URL: http://www.columbia.edu/cu/lweb/digital/collections/nny/index.html External Link

Date(s): 1955-2001

Digital Status: Yes

Extent: Ten interviews with typescript and digitized audio recordings.

Language: English

Interviewees: Kenneth Clark, Mamie Phipps Clark, Moe Foner, John Bertram Oakes

Rights (CRHP): Contact the repository which holds the collection for information on rights

Subjects:

African American psychologists
Art
Civil rights movements--New York (State)
Civil rights movements--Press coverage
Journalists
Labor movement
New York (N.Y.)

Genres:

Interviews
Sound recordings
Transcripts

 

  Back to Top

 

 home >> Civil Rights History Project >> Survey of Collections and Repositories >> Collections >> Collection Record

A - Z Index
  The Library of Congress >> Research Centers
   January 5, 2015
Legal | External Link Disclaimer

Contact Us:
Ask a Librarian