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Oral history interview[s] with Eugene C. Hunt

Repository: Avery Research Center

Collection Description (CRHP): 1980 interview:
In this sequence of interviews, Eugene C. Hunt details his family history, including his father's profession as a ship steward as well as his mother's occupation as a nurse and seamstress. He also elaborates on his parents' efforts and expectations to send all their children to college, despite the monetary challenges they faced. He focuses on his early education, speaking about Avery, its teachers and administration, as well as the offered curriculum. He specifically analyzes his interest in music, drama, and elocution. He refers to the expectations of African American students concerning "the advancement of the race," schooling, college, and the pride associated with Black History. He recalls the lasting impact of Benjamin F. Cox and his wife, Jeanette, on Avery's student body with their emphasis on striving for academic excellence and counseling. He further remembers the American Missionary Association's involvement as well as the dismay of the white community towards Avery, and its degradation into a public institution. Hunt lastly emphasizes the impact of Avery graduates, such as Septima Poinsette-Clark, not only on Charleston's black leadership, but on a national level throughout the Civil Rights Movement. He also recalls Burke High School under Principal William Henry Grayson and its rivalry with Avery. During the second part of the interview, Hunt elaborates on numerous social conditions and discrimination faced at the time, especially racial inequality concerning teacher salaries, the implementation of the national teacher certification examination, as well as an ordinance prohibiting public school teachers from being a member of the NAACP. During the November interview, Hunt focuses extensively on the equalization of teacher salaries, detailing the lawsuit filed on behalf of the NAACP with litigants Malissa Burkhalter and, subsequently, Viola Duvall. The interview concludes with a description of Hunt's participation in the Harvey Gantt case, in which Gantt became the first African American student to be admitted at Clemson University and, through his attendance, desegregated the South Carolina university system.

1985 interview:
In this third interview conducted in 1985, Eugene C. Hunt (1890 – 1995) talks at first about taking music lessons with Charleston’s most renown music teacher at the time, J. Donovan Moore. He refers in detail to his upbringing in Charleston’s Radcliffeborough neighborhood by mentioning several local families and Avery teachers that lived there, such as the Dashes and the Andersons, Ms. Simms and Ms. Clyde. Regarding religious affiliations, Hunt emphasizes his break with Central Baptist Church and joining of St. Mark’s Episcopal Church. Talking about long musical traditions in his family, Hunt recalls singing in several church choirs throughout high school. Inquiring about Charleston’s East Side and its bad reputation, Hunt elaborates on the varying ethnicities comprising the mixed neighborhood. Hunt mainly attributes the acquirement of his vast knowledge in African American and Charleston history to the schools he attended, his family, and people he frequently interacted with, such as Dr. John McFall. Referring to his parents’ professions, Hunt describes his family’s economic situation as poor. However, he emphasizes his parents’ desire to provide a good education for their children. Hunt mentions Ms. Jeannette Cox’s influence and guidance on his academic interests in Communication, English and Speech during his years in college. The interview then talks about the importance of storytelling and narratives in the African American community before concluding with insights on race relations in Charleston, especially Hunt’s relationship with the Stoney Family.

Access Copy Note: Audio and transcripts are available online.

Date(s): 1980, 1985

Extent: 3 interviews

Finding Aid URL: http://lowcountrydigital.library.cofc.edu/cdm4/browse.php?CISOROOT=/AOH External Link

Language: English

Interviewees: Eugene C. Hunt

Rights (CRHP): Contact the repository which holds the collection for information on rights

Subjects:

African American educators--South Carolina
African American neighborhoods
African American schools
Civil rights movements--South Carolina
Clark, Septima Poinsette, 1898-1987
College integration
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

Genres:

Interviews
Sound recordings
Transcripts

 

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   March 5, 2012
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