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 home >> Civil Rights History Project >> Survey of Collections and Repositories >> Collections >> Collection Record

The Civil Rights History Project: Survey of Collections and Repositories

Citizenship school oral histories

Repository: Wisconsin Historical Society. Library-Archives

Collection Description (Extant): Oral history interviews conducted by David Levine, a University of Wisconsin graduate student, with 11 African Americans regarding their involvement with the Citizenship Schools in the South during the 1950s and 1960s. Included are the tape-recorded interviews, written summaries, and background information about the Citizen School program. The interviewees are predominantly from small towns in Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina and discuss what life was like for them before the civil rights movement and during their involvement with the schools, and how life changed for them in the 1960s.

Collection URL: http://arcat.library.wisc.edu/cgi-bin/Pwebrecon.cgi?BBID=22453 External Link

Date(s): 1998

Digital Status: No

Existing IDs: WIHV01-A96

Extent: 0.1 c.f.; 11 tape recordings

Language: English

Interviewees: Ida Proctor Baken, Catherine M. Branch, Marie Epps, Pauline Hendrik, Emogene Stromen Middleton, Idessa Redden, Bill Saunders, Constance Shelley, Dorthea Stewart, Matt Suarez, Inez Taylor

Rights (CRHP): Restricted: Closed to research until January 1, 2023, without the written permission of David Levine.

Subjects:

African Americans--Education
Educators
Highlander Folk School (Monteagle, Tenn.)
Voter registration
Voting

Genres:

Interviews
Sound recordings

 

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   May 15, 2015
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