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2018 Homegrown Concerts

Online Archive of Past Homegrown Concerts

All of the materials from the Homegrown Concert Series are available to visitors in the Folklife Reading Room. Selected materials will be made available online as digital versions are available. Scroll down to see available webcasts and event essays.

Archive Challenge Sampler Concert

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Photos of performing artists in a collage.
Clockwise from the top left, Jaimeo Brown, Elena & Los Fulano, Huda & Kamyar, and the Ship's Company Chanteymen. Photos courtesy of the artists. The Ship’s Company photo is by Wilson Freeman.
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September 20, 2018
Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor,
Thomas Jefferson Building

For the past few years at the Folk Alliance International conference, the American Folklife Center has been organizing "Archive Challenges," at which we ask an array of different folk musicians to learn material from AFC's archive and perform it in a special showcase. Last year we brought this program here to the Coolidge Auditorium, and now we're doing so again!For this edition, AFC invited 4 distinguished artists to dig deep into our archive and put their own creative stamp on the songs and tunes they found here. Each of the artists will perform a few songs from the archive to show what a tremendous resource it is for creative work. The artists are Jaimeo Brown, Huda Asfour & Kamyar Arsani, Elena & Los Fulanos, and the Ship's Company Chanteymen. At this concert, you will hear the music they fell in love with during their research, imbued with their own creativity and style.

Established at the Library in 1928, the AFC archive contains everything from the first wax cylinder recordings of Native American song, to John and Alan Lomax’s pioneering disc-era recordings, to recent digital documentation of folk concerts of all kinds. Best known performers in the Archive include Muddy Waters, Pete Seeger, Honeyboy Edwards, Woody Guthrie, Aunt Molly Jackson, Lead Belly, Doc Watson, Bill Monroe, and Jean Ritchie… and soon, the performers in this showcase! 

The Artists

Jaimeo Brown (pronounced jah-mayo) began his drum career at age 16 with his father, bassist Dartanyan Brown, his mother, pianist and woodwind specialist Marcia Miget, and his drum teacher, Sly Randolph, himself a Bernard Purdie protégé from Harlem.  In the last 20 years, he has worked with a range of musicians including Stevie Wonder, Carlos Santana, Q-Tip, Carl Craig, Bobby Hutcherson, Greg Osby, Joe Locke, David Murray, and several other New York based musicians. He gained extensive experience performing and educating various audiences around the world for the US State Department.  In addition to onstage work, Jaimeo contributed program material for the Oscar and Grammy award-winning documentary Twenty Feet from Stardom and the PBS original production of Ralph Ellison's King of the Bingo Game. When recordings of Gees Bend quilters, an isolated African American community on the Alabama river, found their way into Jaimeo's life, they instantly became some of the most important music in his life; more "spiritual nourishment" than art. The songs of this small group of quilters became the substance of Jaimeo's meditation, medication and inspiration. A decade later, after 14 turbulent years of New York life, Jaimeo's own search for creative and spirtual healing lead him to experiment with weaving samples of the Gees Bend quilters, and other AFC field recordings, into his own music. In doing so, he discovered a sound that "immediately gave me a life's worth of work" and that was to become the source of his definitive project, Transcendence

Elena & Los Fulanos is a bilingual folk rock band based in Washington, DC. Since 2011, they have been creating music that ranges from twangy, heartbreak-themed folk Americana, to soothing, introspective, violin-infused Latin rock. Influenced by front-woman Elena Lacayo's experience growing up in two cultures (Nicaraguan and American), Elena & Los Fulanos creates a world where language and tradition meld with catchy melodies and inventive chords to enhance appreciation for diversity in an increasingly multicultural world. Their debut album, Miel Venenosa, earned a Washington Area Music Association (WAMMIE) nomination for Best Latin Recording in 2014. Their second album, Volcán, (2017) has been hailed as "a bilingual folk album for the resistance" by the Washington City Paper. 

Huda & Kamyar is the duo of Huda Asfour and Kamyar Arsani. Huda comes from a musical family and began formal training in music in Tunis at the age of 13. In 1996, she joined the National Conservatory of Music in Gaza and later, in Ramallah, she was mentored by Khaled Jubran at the Edward Said Music Conservatory. In 2002, Huda joined Al Urmawi Center for Mashriq Music. Huda also trained under the famous Qanoun player Said Rajab in Cairo, Egypt. In 2004, Huda, together with Tamer Abu Ghazaleh, co-founded Jehar band, a musical experiment which molded Arabic folk and the classical Levantine Arabic repertoire into reinterpretations that would be relatable to young Palestinians emerging from the siege of the Second Intifada. Huda is the recipient of the 2009 Production Cultural Program by Al Mawred Al Thaqafi and the 2014 music production grant from the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture. Kamyaris a multi-instrumentalist, singer and songwriter born and raised in Tehran, Iran. Kamyar's musical mission is to spread cultural awareness and unity by mixing contemporary musical trends with traditional Persian folk music. At age 7, Kamyar began daf (Persian frame drum) lessons with Master Bijan Kamkar. Kamyar also spent time playing meditative rhythms for hours at a time for Sufis. Kamyar has spent over 20 years performing and researching the daf and its roots. His second instrument is the kamancheh (Persian bowed string instrument) and he studied it with Masters Ardeshir Kamkar and Sohrab Pournazeri. Kamyar has also taught himself how to play other instruments including guitar, a variety of percussion instruments, melodica, ukulele and more. Kamyar's songs and performances are inspired by the people of Iran and their history of struggle and protest.

Ship's Company Chanteymen is a group specializing in traditional songs from maritime communities. In the days of wooden sailing vessels, sailors sang work songs, known as chanteys, for the purpose of coordinating their actions during heavy labor. Often, they did this with the help of a chanteyman, a song specialist who traded his expertise in singing for a reduction in the hard labor of raising sails and climbing masts. Maritime communities also had other song traditions, from fishing songs to ballads of seafaring life. For 20 years, the singers of Ship's Company Chanteymen have shared these old salts’ songs with audiences up and down the East Coast. Often dressed in 19th century naval uniforms, they perform for historical reenactments, at historic venues, on board ships large and small, and at dockside bars, maritime museums, pirate festivals, and concert venues. The Chanteymen also organize chantey sings throughout the region at which everyone is invited to sing. Many of their songs have choruses and refrains, and they encourage the audience to sing with them, even in an august auditorium like the Coolidge! The Chanteymen have two CDs and have been nominated for a WAMMIE award from the Washington Area Music Association. The Chanteymen are a program of Ship’s Company, a nonprofit organization devoted to living history and nautical education.

 

John McCutcheon: Traditional folk music from the AFC Archive

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A man holding a banjo.
John McCutcheon. Photo by Irene Young.
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September 12, 2018
Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor,
Thomas Jefferson Building

John McCutcheon is an American folksinger, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist. He is regarded as a master of the hammered dulcimer, and is also proficient on many other instruments including guitar, banjo, autoharp, mountain dulcimer, fiddle, and jawharp. His eclectic catalog of ballads, historical songs, children’s songs, love songs, topical satire, fiddle and hammer dulcimer instrumentals, and even symphonic works, are among the broadest in American folk music. His vast repertoire also includes songs from many other contemporary writers. His own songwriting has been hailed by critics around the world; his song "Christmas in the Trenches" is considered a classic and was recently named one of the 100 Essential Folk Songs by NPR, alongside "John Henry," "This Land Is Your Land," and "Blowin' in the Wind." His 36 albums have earned 6 Grammy nominations.

While in his 20s, McCutcheon traveled to Appalachia, collected folk music, and learned from some of the legendary greats of traditional music, such as Roscoe Holcomb, I.D. Stamper, and Tommy Hunter. In addition to his own fieldwork, McCutcheon also traveled and collected with traditional musician and folklorist Mike Seeger. Most of this fieldwork is part of the permanent collections of the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress.

In this very special evening concert, McCutcheon will be playing music exclusively from the AFC's collections, including material from Woody Guthrie and Pete Seeger’s collections, as well as his own.

Stepping Back in Time: Storytelling with Connie Regan-Blake and Barbara Freeman

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Connie Regan-Blake and Barbara Freeman with storyteller Ray Hicks
Connie Regan-Blake and Barbara Freeman with storyteller Ray Hicks
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September 6, 2018, 7:00 PM
Mumford Room
James Madison Building, Library of Congress

In the 1970s, cousins Connie Regan-Blake and Barbara Freeman were both working at the Chattanooga Public Library, Barbara as Children's Librarian and Connie as a full-time storyteller for a special outreach program called MORE. In 1973 they attended the first National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough, TN. There they met Ray and Rosa Hicks of Beech Mountain, North Carolina, who became lasting friends and mentors. They realized they had a special gift for telling stories, and left their careers at the library to perform nationally and internationally as The Folktellers. Regan-Blake and Freeman pioneered "tandem telling," a type of duet storytelling performance, and were on the founding Board of Directors for NAPPS, the National Association for the Preservation and the Perpetuation of Storytelling (now the National Storytelling Network). In 1985, The Folktellers moved to Asheville, North Carolina and began working on a play titled Mountain Sweet Talk. This two-act, fully staged play starred Regan-Blake and Freeman, incorporating original material and stories of The Folktellers. The show ran for seven seasons (1986-1992) with over 300 performances. The Folktellers also toured across the country, performing at folk festivals, including the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington D.C. Regan-Blake and Freeman eventually moved on to solo careers, and both are internationally recognized storytellers. Connie Regan-Blake's collection of recordings, photographs, correspondence, and memorabilia, which documents both her storytelling career and the larger storytelling scene from the 1970s to the present day, is part of the archive of the American Folklife Center. In this special evening program, the two cousins and performing partners step back in time to perform together once again.

Grupo Rebolú: Afro-Colombian Music from New York

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Two men and a woman standing on a city street holding instruments.
Grupo Rebolú
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August 8, 2018
Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor,
Thomas Jefferson Building

Grupo Rebolú is an Afro-Colombian musical ensemble that includes some of the finest Colombian musicians in the United States. The group was created by Ronald Polo (a vocalist, composer, and player of the native Colombian flute known as a gaita), Morris Cañate (a master traditional drummer), and Johanna Castañeda (a vocalist and percussionist) to promote the rich musical traditions of their heritage: the African descendants of Colombia's Caribbean coast. They believe these folkloric traditions should continually evolve over time and incorporate the musical ideas and creativity of new generations of musicians. The original compositions of Ronald Polo for Grupo Rebolú forge new paths for Colombian music, while respectfully remaining faithful to traditional Afro-Colombian rhythms such as gaita, tambora, chalupaand bullerengue.

Lone Piñon: Acoustic Conjunto from New Mexico

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Two men and a woman walking along a county road carrying instruments.
Lone Piñon
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August 1, 2018
Coolidge Auditorium, ground floor,
Thomas Jefferson Building

Lone Piñon is an acoustic conjunto from Northern New Mexico whose music celebrates the diversity and integrity of their region's cultural roots. Using violins, accordion, quinta huapangera, bajo sexto, guitarrón, tololoche, and vocals in Spanish, English, Nahuatl, and P'urépecha, the group has revived and updated the Chicano stringband style that once flourished in New Mexico, bringing a devoted musicianship to Northern New Mexican polkas and chotes, virtuosic Mexican huapango and son calentano, and classic borderlands conjunto. The oldest strands of New Mexican traditional music dwindled in the 1950s when New Mexico was rapidly assimilated into the American economic and cultural environment. But traces of these traditions remain in recordings, photos, and the living memory of elders. The musicians of Lone Piñon--Noah Martinez, Jordan Wax, and Leticia Gonzales—learned from elder musicians, who instilled in them a respect for continuity and an example of the radicalism, creativity, and cross-cultural solidarity that has always informed folk music. In 2014, they formed Lone Piñon to strengthen the oldest strands of New Mexico string music through relationships with elders, study of field recordings, and connections to parallel traditional music and dance revitalization movements in the US and Mexico. Their active repertoire reflects the complexity of this musical landscape and includes twin-fiddle traditions from South Texas, Tohono O'odham fiddle tunes from Arizona, early conjunto accordion music, contemporary New Mexican rancheras and canciones norteñas, orquesta tejana, New Mexican and Mexican swing, huapangos huastecos from the Mexican Huasteca region, and several styles of music from Michoacán: son calentano and son planeco from the southern lowlands and son abajeño and pirekuas from the P'urepecha highlands.

Jeff and Gerret Warner: From the Mountains to the Sea: The Anne and Frank Warner Collection

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Two men and two boys sit on a bench. A flower garden and a car can be seen in the background.
Jeff Warner, Frank Warner, Gerret Warner, and Frank Proffitt, Photo by Anne Warner.
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July 20, 2018, 7:00 PM
Mumford Room
Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress

From the Mountains to the Sea is a two-hour live presentation with multimedia, focusing on the Anne and Frank Warner collection.  The Anne and Frank Warner collection is one of the great treasures in the American Folklife Center archive, containing a wealth of material collected by the husband-and-wife team of folklorists from 1938 to 1966, as they traveled through rural America in search of old songs. This important collection contains such seminal field recordings as North Carolina farmer Frank Proffitt’s rendition of the murder ballad “Tom Dooly.” This field recording was adapted and recorded in 1958 by The Kingston Trio, whose version became a number one hit, won the very first Grammy in country music, and set off the folk boom of the 1960s. Frank Warner was also a popular folksinger, and the Warners’ sons, Jeff and Gerret, got their start as musicians backing up their dad on his recordings and performances; they have been renowned performing musicians for over 50 years. Career musicians and filmmakers, they created this two-hour live multimedia presentation about the Warner collection, featuring not only their own sparkling performances, but also the voices of the singers recorded by their parents across rural America, along with corresponding photographs of the tradition bearers and their homes. It is full of the warmth of the Warners and the country wit of their new friends.  Jeff and Gerret grew up listening to the songs and stories of the traditional singers their parents met during their folksong collecting trips, and they offer valuable insights into the lives and adventures of one of the nation’s most eminent families of folksong collectors. In so doing, they contribute immensely to our understanding of the Warner collection, one of the most important in the AFC archive.

This event was co-sponsored by the Folklore Society of Greater Washington

Newpoli: Traditional Italian Music and Song from Massachusetts

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A group of men and women performing music with an oud (lute), tamborines, a fiddle and drums.
Newpoli
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July 12, 2018, 12:00 PM
Coolidge Auditorium
Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress

Newpoli performs folk songs and dance music from southern Italy, mainly from the regions of Campania and Puglia. They integrate a wide variety of styles such as Tarantella-Pizzica, Tammuriata, Villanella and the Neapolitan Canzone, encompassing music from the Middle Ages to the 19th century.  Because Italian folk music, with the exception of a small number of Neapolitan songs, has not received much global attention or recognition, Newpoli concerts are often the first exposure audience members have to these traditions—even among Italians. Newpoli members are careful to highlight the joy and beauty of the music while explaining the rituals behind the dances and the ancient stories described in the lyrics. Most of the members are graduates of the Berklee College of Music and the New England Conservatory, and are proficient on a wide range of folk and early instruments including bagpipes, flutes, drums, accordions, viols, and lutes. 

Onnik Dinkjian:The Soul of Dikranagerd | Armenian music and song from New Jersey

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A man playing an oud (a type of lute) as another man sings into a microphone
Ara Dinkjian(left) playing oud and Onnik Dinkjian
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July 3, 2018, 12:00 PM
Coolidge Auditorium
Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress

Onnik Dinkjian, 88 years old, remains America’s most renowned Armenian folk and liturgical singer. He has preserved Armenian folk songs from the villages of Anatolia in Eastern Turkey, especially in the unique dialect from his ancestral city of Diyarbekir, known as Dikranagerd to Armenians. Dinkjian is among the last few hundred people who speak this endangered dialect. Dinkjian was born in Paris, France in 1929, to  parents from Dikranagerd. He was orphaned at an early age, and found comfort and happiness in singing, initially in the Armenian Church of Paris. Upon arriving in America in the late 1940s, he began performing at secular functions and quickly became the most-loved singer of the Armenian-American community, and has released recordings of both secular and sacred Armenian music. His fame as a great interpreter of Armenian song has brought him to concert halls throughout Europe, The United States, and South America. In addition to his singing, Mr. Dinkjian has composed many songs, some of which are sung in his native dialect.

Onnik's son, Ara Dinkjian, inherited his father's love and passion for Armenian music. Ara is American-born, and plays both western and eastern instruments including piano, guitar, dumbeg and clarinet. In 1980, he graduated from the Hartt College of Music, earning the country's first and only special degree in the instrument for which he has become most well-known, the oud or Middle Eastern lute. For over forty years, he served as organist in the Armenian Apostolic Church. Throughout his musical life, Ara has continued to develop his highly personal compositional style which blends his eastern and western roots. In 1985, to help realize these compositions and musical concepts, Ara formed his highly acclaimed instrumental quartet, Night Ark. Night Ark's recordings and concert tours were highly influential for musicians and music lovers throughout the world because they demonstrated how music can be progressive and creative while still retaining the dignity and soul of one's culture.

For this concert, Onnik and Ara are joined by an ensemble of outstanding instrumentalists: Tamer Pinarbasi (kanun), Ismail Lumanovski (clarinet), Pablo Vergara (keyboard), Panagiotis Andreou (bass), Engin Gunaydin (percussion).

Folks of Bengal: Traditional song, music, and visual art from Bengal, India

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Four photographs showing three musicians in colorful Indian dress and a woman holding a painted scroll decorated with a woman or goddess surrounded by people.
Folk of Bengal
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June 29, 2018, 12:00 PM
Whittall Pavilion
Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress

Mystic minstrels from the Indian state of Bengal, the Bauls are known for devotional songs that honor the divine within. There are about 2500 Bauls in Bengal. Their philosophy rejects divisions of caste, creed, and religion, and believes in self-searching. Their sung poetry has inspired everyone from Rabindranath Tagore to Bob Dylan and, in 2008, was inscribed in UNESCO's List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. This performance features Girish Khyapa, Rabi Das Baul, Arpan Thakur Chakraborty, and Manas Acharya, all of whom sing and play traditional strings and drums. It also features Mamoni Chitrakar, who will perform pater gaan, traditional songs sung while unfurling colorful paintings that depict the stories narrated in the songs. The five artists will take the audience on a journey through traditional Baul music.

The concert is presented with the support of banglanatak dot com - India, Communities Connecting Heritage (U.S. State Department and World Learning), and the 2018 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

Al. Spendiaryan Qanon Ensemble: Traditional Armenian qanon music

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Two women and two girls pose with quanons; stringed instruments in the zither family
Al. Spendiaryan Qanon Ensemble
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June 26, 2018, 12:00 PM
Coolidge Auditorium
Thomas Jefferson Building

Founded by musician and educator Tsovinar Hovhannisyan, the Al. Spendiaryan Qanon Ensemble was created to encourage Armenian girls and young women to take up an instrument traditionally played by men. The Ensemble has gone on to produce virtuosic musicians, sparking a "gender revolution" in their wake and bringing fresh energy to concert stages around the world. The qanon is a string instrument played in much of the Middle East, Maghreb, West Africa, Central Asia, and southeastern regions of Europe. The name derives from the Arabic word qanun, meaning "rule, law, norm, principle." The qanon is a large zither with a thin trapezoidal soundboard. It is related to the santur and the hammered dulcimer, and is thought to trace its origins back to Assyria, where an ancestral homologue might have been used in Mesopotamian royal courts and religious ceremonies. This concert is presented in association with the 2018 Smithsonian Folklife Festival.

Mdou Moctar: Guitar trio from Niger

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A man in North African dress  playing an electric guitar
Mdou Moctar
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May 10, 2018, 12:00 PM
Coolidge Auditorium
Thomas Jefferson Building

Mdou Moctar is a Tuareg guitarist from a small village in the Azawagh desert of Niger. He plays in the tradition of desert guitar popularized by groups like Tinariwen and Bombino, but adds his own personal touches to the genre. His music is rooted in tradition, with polyrhythms borrowed from the traditional guitar-and-calabash style called "takamba" and lyrics sung in the style of old nomadic poets. His guitar playing is nonetheless wild and unrelenting, showing the influence of global pop.

Coming from a remote region steeped in religious tradition where guitar music was all but prohibited, he taught himself to play on a homemade guitar cobbled together out of planks of wood. Teaching himself in secret, and eventually finding a "real" guitar, he became a local celebrity among the village youth, and went on to become an international recording artist. In 2015, he co-wrote and starred in the first ever Tuareg language film, a Saharan remake of Prince’s Purple Rain.

Professor Horn’s Punch & Judy Show

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Mark Walker with puppets
Professor Horn's Punch and Judy Show
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May 2, 2018
Whittall Pavilion
Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress

10:30-11:00 am

This is a special children’s show and is geared to 4-9 year olds in entertainment and content. This show is co-sponsored by the Young Reader’s Center.

12 noon to 1:00 pm

This event is aimed at a general adult audience. Mark Walker will give a short lecture on the history and traditions of Punch and Judy puppeteering and will display hand-carved puppets and other items from his personal collection of historical Punch and Judy items. After the lecture, he will perform a historically traditional Punch & Judy show.

Punch and Judy puppet shows have their roots in Italian commedia dell'arte. They have entertained English-speaking audiences at least since the 1660s, when Samuel Pepys attended a show in London. The Punch and Judy show draws on ancient folkloric trickster traditions, ideas from medieval carnival, and outrageous slapstick humor. At first intended for adults, the shows have been adapted for children since at least the 19th century.

The earliest known Punch and Judy show in Maryland was by an itinerant conjuror noted in January 1783 in Fell’s Point, Baltimore, offering sleight-of-hand skills and "a whimsical play starring Punchinello." In April 1897, James Edward Ross learned the show from magician and puppeteer Spaff Hyman at Pat Harris's Dime Museum on Baltimore Street. Ross took the stage name "Professor Rosella," and presented Punch & Judy puppet shows throughout the mid-Atlantic region. Rosella was seen by foreign diplomats, national dignitaries, and even president Franklin D. Roosevelt, who said Rosella performed the best Punch & Judy show he had ever seen. Rosella taught the art of Punch & Judy to other entertainers, among them George Horn, who became a noted Punch & Judy performer at the famous Club Charles in Baltimore. In 1963, Mark Walker saw Horn's act as part of a school group. It made a lifelong impression, and 20 years later Walker learned the act from Horn and received his blessing to continue this unbroken Maryland tradition using the stage name "Professor Horn."

Sattriya Dance Company with the Dancing Monks of Assam Traditional Dance from Assam, India

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Two women in east Indian dress standing in classic Indian dance positions.
Sattriya Dance Company
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April 19, 2018, 12:00 PM
Coolidge Auditorium
Thomas Jefferson Building

Sattriya is a dance form which is more than 500 years old, and which comes from the Vaishnavite monasteries of Assam northeast India. The dance was not accessible to women for centuries. In 2000, the Indian government recognized Sattriya as one of the country's major dance forms.

The Philadelphia-based Sattriya Dance Company was launched in 2009 with a mission to tell the story of Sattriya and raise awareness about Majuli and its sattras (monasteries) through performances, lecture demonstrations, and classes. The company's artistic directors are Madhusmita Bora and Prerona Bhuyan.

Madhusmita Bora was born and raised in Assam, and grew up to the rhythms of Sattriya practiced routinely at her village prayer house. She made her debut as a dancer before she turned four, performing at her village temple for the annual Raax festival, dedicated to celebrating the life of Lord Krishna. Madhusmita trained under Padmashree Jatin Goswami, Guru Ramkrishna Talukdar, Guru Naren Barua and Adhyapak Gobinda Kalita from the Uttar Kamalabari Sattra. She has also intensively trained and performed with Kathak Guru Janaki Patrik of New York. 

Prerona Bhuyan was introduced into the world of dance by her mother at the age of four. She studied Sattriya under the guidance of Nirtyacharya Padmashree Jatin Goswami, Guru Naren Barua, Anita Sharma and Guru Ramkrishna Talukdar. Prerona is also a producer with Folk Beats, a music production company, dedicated to promoting and preserving Assamese folk music. She worked on the documentary film Borgeet- Eti Dhrupad Sampad, about a corpus of Assamese songs written by the 15th-16th guru Shrimonto Shankardev and his disciple Madhavdev. She divides her time between the United States and India, promoting Sattriya.

The company will be joined by the Dancing Monks of Assam, a group for internationally performing monk artists led by Sattriya exponent Adhyapak Dr.Bhabananda Barbayan. The monks are engaged in the promotion and propagation of Sattriya art and culture through workshops, seminars, and cultural events.

Support for this project was provided to Madhusmita Bora by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, Philadelphia. Other sponsors include Oil India Limited and Headlong, where Madhusmita is an incubated artist.

 

 

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