skip navigation  The Library of Congress >> Research Centers
AFC Logo
The American Folklife Center
Connect with us:   Blog Blog  |  Facebook Facebook  |  Podcasts Podcasts   RSS RSS  | Video Webcasts
A - Z Index
 home >> events >> cultural heritage archives >> biographies & abstracts

Cultural Heritage Archives:
Networks, Innovation & Collaboration

Symposium: September 26-27, 2013
Montpelier Room, Madison Building, Library of Congress [map]
101 Independence Ave. SE
Washington, DC

Biographies & Abstracts

Gulnara Aitpaeva
Aigine Cultural Research Center, Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic

Gulnara Aitpaeva founded the Kyrgyz Ethnology Department at American University in Kyrgyzstan (1999) and the Department of Cultural Anthropology and Archeology at American University–Central Asia (2002). Currently she is the director of the Aigine Cultural Research Center, which she founded in 2004 with the mission of expanding research on lesser-known aspects of the cultural and natural heritage of Kyrgyzstan, and also integrating folk and scholarly epistemologies related to cultural, biological and ethnic diversities. Her current research interests include sacred sites in Kyrgyzstan; associated new religious movements, traditional knowledge, and practices; and the great Kyrgyz epic Manas and the phenomenon of manaschy, the guardians and tellers of the epic.

"Placing the Epic 'Manas' into the Contemporary World through Digitization" [session III]
The heroic trilogy Manas is the cornerstone of the entire epic heritage of the Kyrgyz people. At the same time, Manas is a living and actively evolving phenomenon. New versions of the epic and new manaschy, or chanters, appear. However, a gap between the general public and bearers of traditional epic knowledge has grown immensely. The initiative of creating the first full video compilation of the Manas trilogy with participation of contemporary epic chanters became one of the main options for repairing the gap between the audience and manaschys. The video compilation is unique and effective because it accomplishes several tasks at the same time: conservation and propagation of the epic, and the facilitation of its use for research, education, recreation, and healing purposes. Digitizing the epic is innovative and meets today's standards of formal and informal education.

Jane Anderson
University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Jane Anderson is Assistant Professor in the Center for Heritage and Society, Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts, and Adjunct Professor of Law at New York University School of Law. Her work is focused on the philosophical and practical problems for intellectual property law and the protection of Indigenous/traditional knowledge resources and cultural heritage. Since 2007 Anderson has worked as an Expert Consultant for the World Intellectual Property Organization on a number of policy proposals for the protection of traditional knowledge and cultural expressions. These include developing a framework for an international alternative dispute resolution/mediation service for intellectual property and Indigenous knowledge disputes, international guidelines for cultural institutions with Indigenous collections, and the development of site-specific intellectual property protocols to assist local communities and enhance and support already-existing knowledge-management practices. Anderson is currently working on a project with the Penobscot Nation, the development of the TK Licenses and Labels initiative, and the book Legal Coloniality: Intellectual Property, Dispossession and the Search for Decolonial Knowledge Sharing Futures.

"Local Contexts: Traditional Knowledge Licenses and Labels" [marketplace I]
This presentation will introduce Local Contexts, an informational website for a new set of Traditional Knowledge (TK) Licenses and Labels developed in response to indigenous communities’ needs. Local Contexts provides a new option for indigenous communities to manage their intellectual property rights and interests in the documentation, digitization, and sharing of their digital cultural heritage. The License and Label options provide indigenous, local and traditional communities new options in terms of access and control, based on customary rules, protocols, guidelines, and models for appropriate use of cultural heritage materials. The framework is also designed to help cultural institutions work with these communities to include missing documentary information and to help negotiate ownership and control of public domain materials. Local Contexts is being developed in partnership with the World Intellectual Property Organization, the Intellectual Property in Cultural Heritage project (IPinCH), the Mukurtu CMS software platform, and the Center for Digital Archaeology.

Alice Apley
Documentary Educational Resources

Alice Apley joined Documentary Educational Resources (DER) as Executive Director in December 2011. Alice oversees all day-to-day activities at DER, including curation, marketing and exhibition of works in DER's catalog, and ensuring ongoing access to the collection for broad audiences through new digital strategies. She also leads the organization's program of filmmaker services, including the fiscal sponsorship program. Her interests include the history of ethnographic film, educational uses of film, and, when she has a chance, making films.

"Forging Archival Collaborations and Alliances: Documentary Educational Resources (DER) and Archiving Educational Resources" [marketplace I]
Documentary Educational Resources (DER), a non-profit organization and a leading distributor of anthropological films, is currently engaged in an extensive effort to create a database for the over eight hundred films in the DER catalog. Founded by John Marshall and Timothy Asch, pioneers in ethnographic filmmaking, DER has had a long and unique relationship with archives and academic departments, serving as the access point for a historically significant collection of anthropological films used extensively in teaching and research. We are exploring best practices for archiving ethnographic films and for collaboration, and beginning construction of a baseline archive of film metadata. We are interested in how we can best support and complement the work of partner institutions, while still serving our unique needs as a distributor.

Jane Arnold
Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University, Canada

Jane Arnold is the Archivist at the Beaton Institute at Cape Breton University. Ms. Arnold joined the archives after graduating with an MLIS from the School of Information Management at Dalhousie University in 2008. Jane works with multi-format collections and fonds including an audio-visual collection featuring rich ethnographic content. Among other projects, she is currently working towards creating an online public access catalogue for the Beaton Institute.

"Unlocking Memories: Using Emerging and Converging Technologies to Celebrate and Preserve Traditional Music in Archival Audio Holdings" [marketplace II]
This presentation will feature recent efforts by the Beaton Institute at Cape Breton University to celebrate and protect its important traditional music holdings. Patron expectations combined with continued deterioration of analog audio creates an array of challenges for archives. The use of emerging and converging technologies continues to develop the ability of archives to digitize, preserve and provide access to traditional music held on obsolete formats. In addition to technological advancements, our examples will illustrate that the best metadata often comes from consultation and collaboration with originating communities and tradition bearers. We will explore the Beaton Institute's new online catalog and online music exhibit, featuring recently digitized traditional recordings from the audio holdings.

Catherine Arseneau
Beaton Institute, Cape Breton University, Canada

Catherine Arseneau joined Cape Breton University as Manager of the Beaton Institute archives in September of 2006. Ms. Arseneau holds a MA in Atlantic Canada Studies from Saint Mary's University, a BA in History with a minor in Music from St. Francis Xavier University and a BACS degree in Museum Studies from Cape Breton University. Catherine is involved in a variety of heritage and archival organizations including Heritage Cape Breton Connection, the Council of Nova Scotia Archives, Public Archives of Nova Scotia Board of Trustees and the Sydney Architectural Conservation Society.

"Unlocking Memories: Using Emerging and Converging Technologies to Celebrate and Preserve Traditional Music in Archival Audio Holdings" [marketplace II]
This presentation will feature recent efforts by the Beaton Institute at Cape Breton University to celebrate and protect its important traditional music holdings. Patron expectations combined with continued deterioration of analog audio creates an array of challenges for archives. The use of emerging and converging technologies continues to develop the ability of archives to digitize, preserve and provide access to traditional music held on obsolete formats. In addition to technological advancements, our examples will illustrate that the best metadata often comes from consultation and collaboration with originating communities and tradition bearers. We will explore the Beaton Institute's new online catalog and online music exhibit, featuring recently digitized traditional recordings from the audio holdings.

Dreanna Belden
University of North Texas Libraries

Dreanna Belden, Asst. Dean for External Relations at University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries, explores how digital cultural heritage collections can most effectively be used in education, and collaborates with museums, libraries, and archives to place historic materials online. In 2011, she became the first librarian elected to the Council of the Texas Association of Museums, and was recently appointed to their executive board. She serves on the Advisory Boards for the Texas House Oral History Project and for PBS's Texas Our Texas programming.

"Where Do Users Find Value?" [session I]
Murray and Belden conducted research that explored the impact and value of digitized resources for users of the Portal to Texas History, a collaborative digital library. The range of primary-source materials includes maps, books, manuscripts, newspapers, diaries, photographs, and letters from the unique collections of 250 partners at Texas libraries, museums, archives, historical societies, genealogical societies, and private families. A common framework of impact value areas included: economic, social, educational, cultural, political, environmental, organizational, and operational. Using a common framework made it possible to conceptually organize findings from several data sources, including a survey, citation analysis, usage statistics, and user-submitted comments. The study discovered interesting results from the demographics of Portal users, and challenged assumptions we had about who these users would be.

""
Danna Bell-Russel
Danna Bell-Russel
""

Danna C. Bell
Library of Congress

Danna C. Bell is currently Vice President and President-Elect of the Society of American Archivists (SAA). Previously she served on the SAA Council, as a member of the Nominations and Elections Committee (twice), as chair of the Committee on Education and Professional Development, as a member and co-chair of the SAA conference Program Committees, and as Associate Reviews Editor for the American Archivist. For her service to the Society and the archives profession she was named a Fellow of the Society in 2008.

Trained as an archivist, she has previously helped to set up archives at the NAACP and at the National Equal Justice Library, which was housed at the American University, Washington College of Law. She has also worked as an archivist in the Washingtoniana Division of the District of Columbia Public Library and in the Special Collections and Archives of the State University of New York, Stony Brook.

Currently she is a member of the Library of Congress Educational Outreach Team. Prior to joining Educational Outreach she worked in the Library's Digital Reference Section answering questions about American Memory and the Library's website, as well as providing demonstrations for users, both in person and through videoconferences.

Steven Bingo
Washington State University

Steven Bingo is a project archivist at Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections at the Washington State University (WSU) Libraries, where he works on a project funded by a Japanese-American Confinement Sites grant. Steven is also involved with an inventory of hidden collections and a digital humanities initiative. Before his time on the Palouse, Steven worked with literary manuscripts as a visiting archivist at The University of Montana.

"Decentering the Incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II" [marketplace II]
Currently, Washington State University (WSU) is involved in a digitization process dating back to 2011, which includes materials related to the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II. Unfortunately, WSU is geographically distant from the sizable Japanese American communities on the West Coast, thus the creation of an online presence is important to maintaining an ongoing user community beyond the tight community of researchers who study the incarceration. This presentation will discuss the challenges of making accessible collections that include traditional archival materials, such as documents and photographs, in addition to textiles, luggage, and audio-visual materials. While I will touch upon the technical aspects of digitization, my focus will be on the collection of metadata, the politically problematic issue of naming the collections, and efforts to publicize the collection beyond the campus community.

Cindy Boeke
Norwick Center for Digital Services, Southern Methodist University

Cindy Boeke is the Digital Collections Developer at the Norwick Center for Digital Services (nCDS), the digitization unit for Southern Methodist University's Central University Libraries (CUL). nCDS has made available some thirty-two thousand image, text, video, and audio files on the CUL Digital Collections web site. CUL Digital Collections reflect the holdings of its special collections, which include strong concentrations of items relating to Texas history and art, Mexico, the U.S. Southwest and West, railroads, the Civil War, World War II, SMU history, African American films, and more.

"Who is Using Online Special Collections?: The CUL Digital Collections Case Study" [marketplace I]
Since 2008, Southern Methodist University's (SMU) Central University Libraries (CUL) have digitized, cataloged and made available on the CUL Digital Collections web site some 32,000 image, text, video, and audio files from the holdings of its rich special collections, which cover the following topics: Texas history, art, and culture; Mexico; the U.S. West and Southwest; Latin America; Europe; the Civil War; World War II; railroads; and SMU history. CUL uses multiple methods to track who is using our thirty-nine digital collections, including Google Analytics and a user survey that helps determine how digitized items are being used to present new insights into fields of study. This poster will provide examples of innovative ways people and communities around the world are using CUL's digitized special collections, data that has opened our eyes to topics of unanticipated interest to the public and researchers, and tools that are helping us build new audiences for digital archives.

""
Doug BoydDoug Boyd
""

Doug Boyd
Director, Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History
University of Kentucky Libraries

Doug Boyd directs the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History at the University of Kentucky Libraries and is a recognized leader regarding oral history, archives, and digital technologies. He recently managed the project Oral History in the Digital Age, which was funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The project established current best practices for collecting, curating, and disseminating oral histories. Boyd currently leads the team that envisioned, designed, and is implementing the open-source Oral History Metadata Synchronizer (OHMS) system, which synchronizes text with audio and video online. He holds a PhD in folklore and ethnomusicology from Indiana University and previously served as the manger of the Digital Program for the University of Alabama Libraries, Director of the Kentucky Oral History Commission, and Senior Archivist for the oral history and folklife collections at the Kentucky Historical Society. He authors the blog Digital Omnium: Oral History, Archives and Digital Technologies, manages "Ask Doug," an automated decision tree for recommending a digital audio recorder, and is the author of the book Crawfish Bottom: Recovering a Lost Kentucky Community published in August 2011 by the University Press of Kentucky.

"Re-envisioning 'Best Practices': Exploring New Models for Archival Education and Training" [session VI]
The Oral History in the Digital Age (OHDA) external link project explored new and innovative models for presenting best practices. The project website creates an ongoing space that is both comprehensive and dynamic. The OHDA resource contains over 70 articles written by experts both inside and outside of the folklore and oral history community, a glossary of over 200 terms pertaining to digital audio, video and archives; a model tool for automating informed decision-making on choosing digital recorders and microphones; as well as the "Thinking Big" video series featuring video interviews with numerous leaders in the field. This introduction uses the OHDA case study to frame a session exploring new, innovative and empowering models for approaching education and training in a cultural heritage archival context.

Elaine Bradtke
Vaughan Williams Memorial Library, English Folk Dance and Song Society, London, UK

Elaine Bradtke is a librarian and ethnomusicologist who, since working with Catherine Hiebert Kerst cataloguing the Sidney Robertson Cowell collection for American Memory, has been involved in projects to bring multi-format ethnographic field collections and related catalogues and indexes to a wider audience through the World Wide Web. This includes facilitating the online version of the Roud Folk Song and Broadside indexes and an index of dances and tunes in the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library (VWML) in London. She has also worked on the online catalogue of the VWML, the James Madison Carpenter Online Catalogue, and related publishing projects. Her interests include Anglophone instrumental music and dance, archival sound recordings and photographs, and the fiddle.

"Bringing It Together and Getting It out There" [session V]
The Vaughan Williams Memorial Library is the cornerstone of the English Folk Dance and Song Society, an organization which combines research, performance, publication, and education all under one roof. In the past decade, we began to exploit the World Wide Web, by hosting the Roud Folk Song and Broadside Indexes, indexes to dances and tunes in published collections, digital images of dance manuals, and folk plays. This led to projects to conserve, catalog, and digitize archival collections and an online library catalog. The Full English is our latest work; in collaboration with six other archives, to make some of Britain's most important folk music collections available with fully integrated search capabilities, an educational facet, and community outreach. This presentation will discuss how it all started in a small, dusty library in North London, and where it should go from here.

Anna Briggs
Université Paris Diderot, France

Anna Briggs is a moving image archivist specializing in amateur and documentary film, film education and programming, and curatorial issues. She is currently a PhD student at the Université Paris Diderot. The subject of her research is non-fiction moving images as archival and curatorial objects.

"The 'Record' Project: The Sound of the Sea and the Silence of Film" [session I]
This paper is a case study of a pilot project developed at the Yorkshire Film Archive (United Kingdom). The Archive commissioned linguistics, film, and history students to use silent amateur films as a primary source for multidisciplinary research that aimed to capture a fishing community's dialect and accent. This case study forms the basis of a reflection on the role of archivists mediating between various communities of users. Issues arising from the project's evaluation—such as the balance between archival control and user rights; the problematic layering of various media; the training of moving image archivists in the fields of local, folk, and micro-history; the blurring of frontiers among industrial, ethnographic, and amateur film codes; and the ambiguous interpretation of history filtered through generations—highlight some of the ethical, political, and aesthetic considerations that must be taken into account when public access programs are implemented by archival institutions.

Alan Burdette
Archives of Traditional Music, Indiana University

Alan Burdette is Director of the Archives of Traditional Music and a member of the Media Preservation working group at Indiana University. He is also Director of the EVIA Digital Archive Project for the preservation and annotation of ethnographic field video. He holds a PhD in folklore and ethnomusicology and is interested in American vernacular musics and performance studies.

"IMPAC -- The Archives of Traditional Music and a Collaborative Indiana University Strategy for Saving Its Media Holdings" [session III]
My presentation will give an overview of the Archives of Traditional Music's strategy for the digital preservation of its holdings. By spearheading and supporting the creation of a central preservation production facility for the Bloomington campus, the Archives intends to reach our goal of digitally preserving our collections of rare and unique materials within fifteen years. With deterioration and obsolescence risks closing in on our collections, we have chosen to join forces with other media-holding units on our campus and create a campus-wide plan for media preservation. After five years of planning, we are on the cusp of getting administrative approval to begin implementing a shared facility. My presentation will provide background on our planning process and strategies, give a current status update, and discuss the prioritization process that units on campus are participating in as preparation.

Cynthia Byrd
Ward Museum, Salisbury University, Maryland

Cynthia Byrd is Director of Exhibitions and Research at the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art, Salisbury, Maryland, and adjunct faculty member at Salisbury University, where she conducts research and develops exhibitions, publications, and programming on material culture, folklife, and critical regionalism. Most recently, she has published Pass It On, a curriculum resource for teachers on the Eastern Shore of Maryland seeking to incorporate cultural heritage learning in their classrooms. Her other interests include women's folklife, textile arts, and interdisciplinary courses that bring art, nature, and culture together in secondary school and university environments.

"Developing Archives alongside Educational Materials: Synergy, Accessibility, and Interpretation" [session V]
When archive development coincides with the development of an institution's educational and interpretive materials, the potential for the growth of both can be dramatic. The collection and processing of new archival materials inspires new interpretive projects, while primary resources collected for educational and interpretive materials are added to the archive. Ethnographers who work for cultural institutions may find themselves wondering whether the tail is wagging the dog as they make decisions about building, maintaining, and sharing their collections. This presentation will share the experiences of the Ward Museum at Salisbury University and the development and growth of a physical and online archive in conjunction with the creation of Pass It On, a folklife curriculum for K-12 teachers, which has grown into an important community resource and a model for other institutions pursuing similar projects.

Elizabeth Call
Brooklyn Historical Society

Elizabeth Call has been at the Othmer Library & Archives at the Brooklyn Historical Society since 2006. She currently holds the position of Special Collections Librarian and as such is responsible for managing the library's books, maps, newspapers, journals and other printed materials, along with the management and oversight of the library and archives public services, which include reference, class instruction, and workshops.

"If These Walls Could Talk: Teaching Archival Research through House Histories" [session VI]
Brooklyn has a rich cultural heritage, which is demonstrated in its built environment. Walking through the borough's streets is like conducting an archeological dig; layers upon layers of history become apparent from corner to corner of a single block. At the Brooklyn Historical Society we noticed that many Brooklynites who wanted to know more about the buildings they live in did not use our resources. To serve these users, we started a series of Saturday workshops focused on building research, allowing them to come and spend the afternoon gaining hands-on experience using archival materials such as fire insurance maps, land conveyance records, city directories and photographs to get at the histories of particular addresses. This presentation is a case study of how to engage populations and empower them with the tools necessary to unearth a shared cultural heritage.

Matt Carruthers
University of Miami Libraries

Matt Carruthers has been a Metadata Librarian at the University of Miami Libraries since 2012, where he works with digital projects for special collections and archival materials. His interests include the application of linked data in the library community, the development of shareable metadata, and resource discoverability in a digital environment.

"Experimenting Locally with Encoded Archival Context - Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF): Moving toward Linked Archival Metadata?" [session II]
Although standards such as Encoded Archival Description (EAD) have helped make finding aids more visible and accessible, there is another layer that often remains hidden to researchers: the sociocultural context of the people and institutions whose work is preserved in archival collections. Archivists, librarians, and institutions can benefit from experimenting locally with Encoded Archival Context – Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF), the emerging standard for capturing this context, and from exploring its potential as a heuristic tool that can help them rethink their descriptive practice in creative ways. This presentation will discuss our personal experience creating EAC-CPF records and the reasons we believe it is a worthwhile endeavor. EAC-CPF promises to improve access to archival collections. In addition to its practical application, it also provides archivists and librarians with a way to engage their collections in new ways, helping them reconceptualize the metadata they have created.

Eric Cartier
University of Maryland Libraries

Eric Cartier is the Digital Reformatting Specialist at the University of Maryland Libraries, where he oversees daily operations in its Digitization Center. He studied at the University of Texas at Austin and revived his love for spoken word recordings while working as the audio preservation technician at the Harry Ransom Center. His other interests include radio dramas, old news broadcasts, recently obsolete digital technology, and experimental electronic music.

"Saving College Radio" [marketplace I]
The University of Maryland's Special Collections is proud to present a new exhibit entitled Saving College Radio: WMUC Past, Present and Future, located in the Maryland Room Gallery at Hornbake Library. The title reflects a two-pronged approach in which "saving" refers to our efforts to archive this historical collection, as well as the importance of maintaining support for the campus station. The variety of materials in the WMUC collection is extensive, and includes photographs, fliers, 'zines, vertical files, correspondences and audiovisual formats. The Digital Conversion and Media Reformatting (DCMR) division has been integrating standard procedures with innovative approaches in order to preserve the content and make it accessible to patrons and alumni. This poster will illustrate how these practices have facilitated a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the campus radio station, while improving the UMD Libraries' standards of preservation and digital stewardship.

Alexandria Caster
Arizona Historical Society Library and Archives

Alexandria Caster is an archivist and librarian with a profound interest in historic photographs as well as art, history and cultural heritage traditions of varied expressions. She received her MA in Information Resources and Library Science from the University of Arizona, where she was selected as a Knowledge River Scholar (Cohort Eight). She has worked as an Archivist at the Arizona Historical Society in Tucson for the past two years. Prior to joining the archives profession, Ms. Caster spent several years working in libraries and museums and as an owner of an art gallery/bookstore. Her research interests currently focus on variations of cultural expression, constructions of memory, and the intersection of art, identity, language and representation as reflected through the photographic medium. In her spare time, Ms. Caster is an avid photographer and artist.

"Visible Culture, Enduring Memory: Sharing Historic Photos of Arizona's Mexican Heritage with the Digital Generation" [marketplace II]
Recent conflicts over banning of ethnic studies illustrate how southern Arizona's rich cultural heritage has come under attack by efforts to contest or marginalize community memory and cultural history. This poster session focuses on a project designed to share online hundreds of important cultural heritage photographs, which richly illustrate Arizona's Mexican cultural heritage. Archivist Alexandria Caster, noting that diverse photographs collected by the groundbreaking Mexican Heritage Project in the 1980s offered a powerful window on community memory, began a project to offer the digital generation worldwide access to these images. A Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant provided support for a new digital exhibit of hundreds of photos now online at the Arizona Memory Project. This poster highlights efforts of project manager Alexandria Caster and Lizeth Zepeda, Knowledge River Graduate Assistant, with regards to digitization, exhibit creation, and outreach efforts to bring community members closer to this vital cultural heritage archive.

Maryna Chernyavska
University of Alberta

Maryna Chernyavska works as a Researcher and Archival Assistant at the Bohdan Medwidsky Ukrainian Folklore Archives at the Kule Folklore Centre, University of Alberta. She is involved in numerous projects including exhibits, publications, oral histories, and digitization initiatives. Maryna received her Folklore MA from the University of Alberta and is now pursuing her MA in Library and Information Studies. Her interests include folk belief, folklore archives, culture and environmental sustainability, and the cultural history of Bukovina.

"Свій до свого по своє, or Givers, Users, and Research Subjects of the Ukrainian Folklore Archives at the U of A" [session I]
The Ukrainian Folklore Archives at the University of Alberta were founded in 1977. Our policy declares documenting Ukrainian Canadian cultural heritage to be of special interest. The Archives grow to a great extent due to the generosity of the vibrant Ukrainian Canadian community. Ukrainian Canadians frequently donate materials related to various social and cultural aspects of Ukrainian Canadian community life, including immigration, politics, religion, education, music, art, and folklore. At the same time, they are also research subjects for our graduate students and faculty, and frequent users of the archival materials. In my presentation, I explore the Ukrainian Canadian community as givers, users, and research subjects of the Ukrainian Folklore Archives. I examine how their different roles shape the archival collections, impact our acquisition priorities, and affect preservation activities at the Archives.

Kimberly Christen [unable to attend]
Washington State University

Kimberly Christen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Critical Culture, Gender and Race Studies, Director of Digital Projects at the Plateau Center for American Indian Studies and Associate Director of the Digital Technology and Culture program at Washington State University. Her academic research focuses on the intersection of digital technologies, archival practices, cultural heritage movements and intellectual property rights within indigenous communities and other stakeholders. Dr. Christen is currently directing the Plateau Peoples' Web Portal, a collaboratively curated online site for Plateau cultural materials, and Mukurtu CMS, a free, open source digital archive and content management tool specifically designed to meet the needs of indigenous communities as they manage and share their digital cultural heritage. More of Dr. Christen's work, including publications and projects, can be found at her website: www.kimchristen.com and you can follow her on twitter @Mukurtu.

"Local Contexts: Traditional Knowledge Licenses and Labels" [marketplace I]
This presentation will introduce Local Contexts, an informational website for a new set of Traditional Knowledge (TK) Licenses and Labels developed in response to indigenous communities’ needs. Local Contexts provides a new option for indigenous communities to manage their intellectual property rights and interests in the documentation, digitization, and sharing of their digital cultural heritage. The License and Label options provide indigenous, local and traditional communities new options in terms of access and control, based on customary rules, protocols, guidelines, and models for appropriate use of cultural heritage materials. The framework is also designed to help cultural institutions work with these communities to include missing documentary information and to help negotiate ownership and control of public domain materials. Local Contexts is being developed in partnership with the World Intellectual Property Organization, the Intellectual Property in Cultural Heritage project (IPinCH), the Mukurtu CMS software platform, and the Center for Digital Archaeology.

Stephanie Christensen
National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution

Stephanie Christensen is the Digital Imaging Manager at the National Anthropological Archives, Smithsonian Institution. Prior to this, she served as the manager of the digital imaging facility at the Chicago Albumen Works. She is a member of the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative Still Image Working Group and has served on the Smithsonian Digitization Program Advisory Committee and the National Museum of Natural History Digitization Committee.

"Encounter with the Harrington Collection" [marketplace I]
The John P. Harrington Papers, one of the largest collections in the National Anthropological Archives (NAA), has been extensively used by researchers as diverse as linguists, ethnobotanists, environmental scientists, cultural anthropologists, and Native American scholars from Oklahoma to Oregon. The NAA has launched a new effort to make this material more accessible, moving from microfilm and audio tape to online access. This talk will focus on some of the challenges, achievements, and rewards of working with this complex and challenging collection, and how we have begun to make it accessible through digitization.

Shauna Collier
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Shauna Collier is the Stone Center Librarian for Black Culture and History and the subject librarian for African American Studies at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She received a BA in marketing from Jackson State University and a master of information & library studies from the University of Alabama. Prior to working at UNC she was the African American studies librarian and the librarian for the Anacostia Community Museum with Smithsonian Institution Libraries. Other previous positions include reference librarian with Live Oak Public Library in Savannah, Georgia, records librarian for EPA Region IV, Atlanta, and archivist with The Herndon Home Museum in Atlanta. Her research interests include African American culture, family history, community history and the history of African American education.

"Intersections between Community, Collaboration, and Education: Project RIGHT Now and the Preservation of African American History" [session VI]
Project RIGHT (Research, Identify, and Gather Historical Treasures) Now – Carolinas! (PRNC) is a volunteer consulting group consisting of professionally trained archivists, public historians, librarians and graduate students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. Founded in 2011, PRNC works in partnership with communities from North Carolina and South Carolina to study and preserve local African American history. Members of the group actively pursue scholarly investigations of all facets of the life and work of individuals, organizations, and cultural institutions. In addition, PRNC provides educational outreach, workshops, and programs to help communities identify, preserve, and develop primary source collections held both publicly and privately. Examples of PRNC projects include a workshop entitled "Preserving the History of St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church," held at St. Paul Church in Chapel Hill, NC; and an oral history project with alumni of the Russell School, the only surviving Rosenwald-funded school building remaining in Durham County.

Bradley Daigle
University of Virginia

Bradley Daigle is Director of Digital Curation Services and Digital Strategist for Special Collections at the University of Virginia Library. He was the Principal Investigator on the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation grant entitled Born Digital Materials: An Inter-Institutional Model for Stewardship (AIMS). Having been in the library profession for over a decade, he has published and presented on a wide range of topics including mass digitization, digital curation and stewardship, sustaining digital scholarship, intellectual property issues, mentoring in libraries, and digital preservation. In addition to his professional field, his research interests also include the history of the book, natural history, and early modern British literature. He received his MA in literature from the University of Montreal and an MLS from Catholic University.

"Genie in a Bottle? The Users' Wishes for Stewarded Archival Data" [session II]
The University of Virginia Library is working to combine digitized archives with the onslaught of born digital content in a single, open-source solution. We require a fine-grained intellectual property solution for collections that have mixed rights. These efforts also seek to eliminate redundant metadata management strategies that are often part of archival workflows (e.g. collection level metadata in MARC as well as EAD). This approach would allow for the creation of a single collection object that could contain all the information related to the collection. Building on the lessons learned from AIMS (http://www.digitalcurationservices.org/aims/), this work will create a comprehensive solution to how manuscript data can be integrated into the basic search of a digital library environment. There is no single open-source solution that can manage such heterogeneous materials and the complicated structures and rights they require. We hope to change that.

Anna Fariello
Hunter Library, Digital Initiatives, West Carolina University

With training as a professional curator, Anna Fariello is an Associate Professor at Western Carolina University's Hunter Library, where she is building digital collections focused on the region's material culture. She is a former research fellow with the Smithsonian American Art Museum and former Fulbright Scholar. Fariello currently serves as Museology Specialist for the US Fulbright Commission and serves on the board of the World Craft Council. She is author of numerous book chapters, articles, and conference presentations, and curator of over 40 exhibitions. Among her publications, she is author of three books on Cherokee crafts, author of the interpretive travel guide, Blue Ridge Roadways: A Virginia Field Guide to Cultural Sites (2006), and co-author of the textbook Objects & Meaning: New Perspectives on Art and Craft (2003). Recipient of the 2010 Brown Hudson Award from the North Carolina Folklore Society, she was recently honored with a 2013 Guardians of Culture award from the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums.

"Hand to Hand: Connecting Digital Humanities to Community" [session IV]
This session is built on experiences at Western Carolina University where an academic library's Digital Initiatives program works hand-in-hand with the region's many archival repositories to create robust online access to archival holdings. While some of Hunter Library's external partners are large (Great Smoky Mountains National Park, for example), most partner archives are housed at smaller institutions with few staff and limited resources. Over the past decade, the library has built relationships with diverse groups, including local and indigenous partners, state and federal partners, as well as internal university partners. This paper will describe a number of successful online archival collections and will focus on the development of external partnerships with specific strategies for involving underserved communities in professional practice and the challenges involving community partners.

Natalia Fernández
Oregon Multicultural Archives, Oregon State University

Natalia Fernández is the Oregon Multicultural Librarian for the Oregon Multicultural Archives (OMA) at Oregon State University's Special Collections & Archives Research Center. Through the OMA, Fernández works to assist in preserving the histories and sharing the stories that document Oregon's African American, Asian American, Latino/a, and Native American communities. She has co-authored articles regarding OMA collections in the Oregon Historical Quarterly, the Oregon Library Association Quarterly, and the Journal of Western Archives. Prior to joining Oregon State University in November 2010, she interned at the Arizona Historical Society and worked as a graduate assistant at the University of Arizona Library Special Collections. Fernández holds an MA in Information Resources and Library Science from the University of Arizona's Knowledge River Program.

"Oregon Multicultural Archives: Supporting Communities through Collaboration" [marketplace II]
The Oregon Multicultural Archives (OMA) was established at Oregon State University in 2005 with the mission to assist in preserving the histories and sharing the stories that document Oregon's African American, Asian American, Latino/a, and Native American communities. Over the past few years the OMA has promoted its mission through collaborative projects that support communities through education and sharing resources. Two such projects are: the Oregon Tribal Archives Institute, a week-long training in August 2012 designed to address the need for in-depth archives training for Oregon's nine federally recognized tribes, and the Oregon Chinese Disinterment Documents project, a joint effort between Oregon Public Broadcasting, Portland's Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association community archives, Portland State University, and the OMA, to make the collection's documents available online and enable the community archives to retain physical control of the collection.

Carl Fleischhauer
Library of Congress

Carl Fleischhauer has degrees from Kenyon College and Ohio University. His professional work has included film and video production at West Virginia University as well as folklife field research, multimedia documentation, and publications at the American Folklife Center. His current activities pertain to digital preservation at the Library of Congress and the development of technical standards for the preservation of digital audio-visual content.

"The Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative: An Update" [session III]
The Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative is a collaborative effort by eighteen federal agencies to define common guidelines, methods, and practices for digitizing historical content. Recognizing that the effort would require specialized expertise, two separate working groups were formed. The Federal Agencies Still Image Digitization Working Group concentrates its efforts on items that can be reproduced in image form, albeit often with accompanying searchable texts, e.g., books, manuscripts, maps, and photographic prints and negatives. The Federal Agencies Audio-Visual Working Group is focusing its work on the digitization of sound and video recordings and motion picture film. The goal of the initiative, which was launched in 2007, is to articulate a common set of guidelines, methods, and practices for the digitization of historical content.

Amma Y. Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin
University of Colorado Boulder

Amma Y. Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Theatre and Dance at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where she writes about, teaches, and creates performance-centered methodologies of studying the past. She is currently completing two projects: an historical musical created virtually verbatim from archival material about black performers in the 1901 Pan-American Exposition (Buffalo's world's fair) entitled, At Buffalo; and a manuscript about the relationship between laughter and the American slave experience, entitled Laughing after Slavery: The Performances and Times of Laughing Ben Ellington.

"Performing the Archives: Connecting Undergraduates to Archival Collections" [session I]
Two CU-Boulder faculty members will demonstrate pedagogical uses of archival collections that involve undergraduates, active learning, historical research, and cultural heritage archives. Academic archives are not normally seen as the domain of non-history majors but these faculty members have reimagined the undergraduate research experience. Amma Y. Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin, a theater professor, explains the concept of performance-centered methodologies of studying the past, which she calls "performing the archive." Theater and dance students reconstruct and deconstruct verbatim the newspaper articles, filmstrips, photographs, and song sheets found in over twenty archival collections about black performers in the 1901 World's Fair in Buffalo, NY. Deborah Hollis, a special collections librarian, developed an independent study course that combined the teaching of research methods with learning the practical application of filming a short creative work. These models demonstrate that librarians and archivists can work with campus faculty to promote the active use of archival collections in the curriculum.

""
Mike Giarlo
Michael J. Giarlo
""

Michael J. Giarlo
Pennsylvania State

Michael J. Giarlo is Digital Library Architect at the Pennsylvania State University. His primary roles are designing a technical architecture for durable access to the institution's digital assets, providing vision and strategy for the development of the architecture, building a development team, and fostering community around digital curation locally and abroad. In 2010, Mike co-founded CURATEcamp, a series of "unconferences" building community around the practice of digital curation, and in 2012 he served as program chair of the Association for Information Science and Technology's Research Data Access & Preservation Summit. He has been working in library technology since 1999, holding systems administration and software development positions primarily in support of digital libraries and repositories at the Library of Congress, Princeton University, the University of Washington, and Rutgers University. He earned both a bachelor's degree in linguistics and a master's degree in library and information science from Rutgers. Earlier this year, Mike published "Academic Libraries as Data Quality Hubs," an article in the Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication that explores the connection between libraries' traditional stewardship role and research data services on campus.

"Building the Worlds in Which We Remember" [session III]
The amount of information in digital form continues not only to grow but to accelerate in growth. This presents a challenge to cultural heritage institutions: if we were already struggling to keep up with the pace of information growth, how will this trend impact cultural memory in the long term? In this presentation, I will discuss the roles architecture and technology can play in stewardship and the challenges facing cultural heritage institutions, and connect these to the topics that will be covered by other presenters within the Preservation and Digital Stewardship session.

Ivey Glendon
University of Virginia Library

Ivey Glendon is a Metadata Librarian at the University of Virginia Library, where she consults with faculty, students and staff on metadata schema and controlled vocabularies; suggests tools for metadata creation and management; and provides project management support. Prior to joining the University of Virginia in 2011, she served as a digital conversion specialist for the National Digital Newspaper Program at the Library of Congress.

"Metadata Creation and Training for the WSLS-TV News Film Collection, 1951-1971" [session II]
In 2010, the University of Virginia Library received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to preserve and make accessible some 13,000 film clips and accompanying anchor scripts from the WSLS television station in Roanoke, Virginia. The material contained in the collection represents a snapshot of life covering an array of topics such as school integration, community politics, and local amusements such as parades and beauty pageants. In 2013, the Metadata Management Services unit began devising a framework for describing the collection. The challenge has been two-fold: implement a new non-MARC metadata standard (PBCore) at the Library and provide access through controlled vocabularies. Significant staff training has been required to become familiar with the PBCore standard and to ensure consistent description by a team of catalogers. Using a Google Form and a basic description structure, we aim to process the collection in one calendar year beginning summer 2013.

Ahmed Samir Habib
Bibliotheca Alexandrina, Alexandria, Egypt

Ahmed Samir Habib currently serves as Director of the Enterprise Applications and Integrated Solutions Department at Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt. He obtained his BSC in Computer Engineering in 2001 from Alexandria University, Egypt. He has worked as a programmer at Pfizer, as a computer engineer at the Egyptian Ministry of Communication and Information Technology, and as a security system analyst at the Egyptian Presidency. He joined the Bibliotheca Alexandrina in 2001, and has worked there as a software engineer, as Head of the Software Engineering Unit, and as Project Manager of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector. His software represents the core of the BA's institutional infrastructure, including the content management system, archiving, workflows of administrative procedures; and the oracle-based enterprise resources system which manages personnel, finance, purchasing, inventories, etc. He has also supervised the creation of several digital library projects, including the BA's digital library of inscriptions and the award-winning Memory of Modern Egypt digital archive.

"Digitization Approaches for Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Collections" [session III]
Under its mission to preserve cultural heritage in digital form, the Bibliotheca Alexandrina (BA) has embarked on several initiatives, creating sixteen digital archives featuring the Egyptian history from different perspectives. Through this paper, two practices are demonstrated. The Memory of Modern Egypt digital archive represents an online repository of tens of thousands of different culturally and historically significant material documenting the modern history of Egypt from 1805 - 1981. The archive brings this heterogeneous collection together in a single multidimensional web of materials and themes interrelating with each other to enable the user to explore the connections among the different sources and historical facts in the repository. Digitizing the Egyptian National Documents Archive (Dar Al Mahfuzat), on the other hand, despite the homogeneity of the collection, represents another challenge: managing an archive of millions of Egyptian documents dating back to 1805, while maintaining appropriate, nationally mandated confidentiality and access levels.

Lori E. Harris
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Lori E. Harris is a second-year graduate student in the Department of Information and Library Sciences at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Currently Ms. Harris works as a Library Associate at North Carolina State University in the Special Collections Research Center. She holds a BA in American Studies and Certificates in Archival Studies and Museum Studies from Smith College. Ms. Harris' primary field of research has been the lived experiences of African American women from the early 1900s to the present. She has worked as a junior archivist at the Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, and served as an intern at the Sophia Smith Collection, Northampton, MA, where she researched and designed an online exhibit documenting the history of reproductive rights, eugenics, and race in the United States. Ms. Harris' most recent research included conducting oral interviews of a group of African American women from the Washington, D.C., area on issues surrounding their mental, spiritual and physical wellbeing.

"Intersections between Community, Collaboration, and Education: Project RIGHT Now and the Preservation of African American History" [session VI]
Project RIGHT (Research, Identify, and Gather Historical Treasures) Now – Carolinas! (PRNC) is a volunteer consulting group consisting of professionally trained archivists, public historians, librarians and graduate students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. Founded in 2011, PRNC works in partnership with communities from North Carolina and South Carolina to study and preserve local African American history. Members of the group actively pursue scholarly investigations of all facets of the life and work of individuals, organizations, and cultural institutions. In addition, PRNC provides educational outreach, workshops, and programs to help communities identify, preserve, and develop primary source collections held both publicly and privately. Examples of PRNC projects include a workshop entitled "Preserving the History of St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church," held at St. Paul Church in Chapel Hill, NC; and an oral history project with alumni of the Russell School, the only surviving Rosenwald-funded school building remaining in Durham County.

Deborah Hollis
Archives and Special Collections, University of Colorado Boulder

Deborah Hollis is an Associate Professor at the University of Colorado Boulder Libraries and the head of Special Collections. She has built a vigorous special collections instruction program in thirteen years of leading the department and collaborates with faculty to design active-learning instruction involving special-subject collections. She is currently investigating ways in which archival collections can be the primary content for student-centered multi-media projects.

"Performing the Archives: Connecting Undergraduates to Archival Collections" [session I]
Two CU-Boulder faculty members will demonstrate pedagogical uses of archival collections that involve undergraduates, active learning, historical research, and cultural heritage archives. Academic archives are not normally seen as the domain of non-history majors but these faculty members have reimagined the undergraduate research experience. Amma Y. Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin, a theater professor, explains the concept of performance-centered methodologies of studying the past, which she calls "performing the archive." Theater and dance students reconstruct and deconstruct verbatim the newspaper articles, filmstrips, photographs, and song sheets found in over twenty archival collections about black performers in the 1901 World's Fair in Buffalo, NY. Deborah Hollis, a special collections librarian, developed an independent study course that combined the teaching of research methods with learning the practical application of filming a short creative work. These models demonstrate that librarians and archivists can work with campus faculty to promote the active use of archival collections in the curriculum.

Alexia Hudson-Ward
Pennsylvania State University, Abington

Alexia Hudson-Ward is an Associate Librarian at Penn State Abington College. She is the recipient of several professional honors including being named an "Emerging Leader" by the American Library Association (2007) and highlighted as a 'Mover and Shaker' (2008) by Library Journal. Alexia's work has appeared in a variety of publications including The Oxford Encyclopedia of African-American History, Reference Reborn: Breathing New Life Into Public Services Librarianship, and Preserving Local Writers, Genealogy, Photographs, Newspapers, and Related Materials. Since 2011, Alexia has served as the volunteer Eastern Area Archivist for The Links, Incorporated, an international non-profit women's organization dedicated to "enriching, sustaining, and ensuring the culture and economic survival of African Americans and other persons of African ancestry."

"Preserving While We Climb: Educational Approaches to Cultural Heritage Records Management with the Eastern Area of The Links, Incorporated" [session VI]
The Links, Incorporated was founded in Philadelphia, PA in 1946 by a small group of African American women committed to "linking" their resources in response to the needs and aspirations of African-American people. Over the years, The Links, Incorporated has forged partnerships with the NAACP, the National Urban League, and the United Nations. The organization is comprised of four large geographical areas with 273 local chapters.
The Eastern Area of The Links, Incorporated applies a strategic approach to preserving its cultural legacy through a partnership with The Historical Society of Pennsylvania (HSP). This relationship undergirds the organization's layperson archival training process that ensures important cultural heritage elements are properly preserved. The evolution of the educational and tactical approaches to preserving the cultural memory of The Eastern Area of The Links, Incorporated over nearly seven decades will be reviewed. Details about the HSP partnership, along with internally developed archival and documentary training materials, will also be shared.

Karen L. Jefferson
Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta University Center

Karen L. Jefferson is a Records Manager at the Robert W. Woodruff Library of the Atlanta University Center, and has over thirty-five years of experience working in archives. Most of her career has been working to collect, preserve, promote, and provide access to archival materials at historically black colleges and universities (HBCU). She was a participant, presenter, and mentor in the HBCU Library Alliance collaborative projects to strengthen archival programs at HBCUs.

"HBCU Library Alliance: Historically Black Colleges and Universities Strengthening Archives through Collaboration" [session IV]
The HBCU Library Alliance is a consortium of one hundred libraries at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Through collaboration with the Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts, Cornell University Libraries, Image Permanence Institute at the Rochester Institute of Technology (IPI), LYRASIS, and the University of Delaware Art Conservation Department, the alliance has been awarded grants totaling over three million dollars. These funds were used to assist HBCU libraries and archives with the development of archival programs including training staff; purchasing equipment, supplies, and conservation services; digital reformatting; and the preservation of and increased access to historical materials.

Peter B. Kaufman
(Intelligent Television)

Peter B. Kaufman is president and executive producer of Intelligent Television in New York City. Intelligent Television produces films, videos, and television in close association with cultural and educational institutions worldwide. With Google/YouTube's investment, INT recently launched the Intelligent Channel on YouTube to present an original multi-part series focused on politics, history, art, and literature. The Intelligent Channel, which premiered in January 2012 featuring two series devoted to television archives, now has 35,000 subscribers. Educated at Cornell and Columbia University, Kaufman has served as associate director of Columbia University's Center for New Media Teaching and Learning; co-director, with the British Film Institute's Paul Gerhardt, of JISC's Film & Sound Think Tank in the UK; and co-chair of the Copyright Committee of the Association of Moving Image Archivists. His recent written work includes "Oral History in the Digital Age," "Assessing the Audiovisual Archive Market: Models & Approaches for Audiovisual Content Exploitation," "Film and Sound in Higher and Further Education: A Progress Report with Ten Recommendations" with Paul Gerhardt; and "Video on Wikipedia and the Open Web: A Guide for Cultural and Educational Institutions." His newest film, on Russian writers in the age of Putin, hosted by actor and author Stephen Fry, will appear on public television in the fall of 2013.

"Creativity and Moving Image Archives"
What if we were able to tell our stories through the moving image with the ease with which we tell our stories through the printed word? The technology to communicate may be available, but our cultural heritage archives - and moving image archives in particular - lack the welcoming utility of our public libraries. We need to develop a process that empowers pioneers - journalists, historians, artists, scientists and other explorers - to journey into our collections, not just to send dispatches back from the coalface but also to create new works and new insights by working with these valuable assets. This process includes incentives to attract pioneers into our moving image archives, simple confidence-building measures by the host institutions, and distinctive showcases and platforms to bring new work to new audiences.

Hana Kim
University of Toronto, Canada

Hana Kim has been the Korea studies librarian at the Cheng Yu Tung East Asian Library, University of Toronto, since 2003, where she is responsible for collection management and development, and services relating to Korean Studies. She has been involved in several digitization projects of special collections of the East Asian Library. Her interests include collaborative collection development, Korean-Canadian heritage preservation, and outreach and liaison work.

"Building a Nation-Wide Korean Canadian Heritage Archives in Canada: Issues and Challenges" [marketplace II]
The Korean Canadian Heritage Archives is a collaborative project of the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia, which aims to create a nationwide online searchable database for materials relating to Korean Canadian culture and history. The purpose of this project is to better document the Korean experience in Canada by collecting records into one location and making these readily accessible to the public. The project intends not only to deal with existing cataloged material, but also to accumulate previously uncataloged primary sources relating to Korean Canadians. Any materials related to or created by Korean Canadians are significant to the project.

Helen Kim
University of British Columbia, Canada

Helen Kim has been a Korean studies librarian at the Library of the University of British Columbia in Canada, since 2007, where she manages the Korean collection of the library. She has been collecting resources published in Korean and related to Koreans in western Canada, and working on the Korean Canadian Heritage Archives project collaboratively with the University of Toronto.

"Building a Nation-Wide Korean Canadian Heritage Archives in Canada: Issues and Challenges" [marketplace II]
The Korean Canadian Heritage Archives is a collaborative project of the University of Toronto and the University of British Columbia, which aims to create a nationwide online searchable database for materials relating to Korean Canadian culture and history. The purpose of this project is to better document the Korean experience in Canada by collecting records into one location and making these readily accessible to the public. The project intends not only to deal with existing cataloged material, but also to accumulate previously uncataloged primary sources relating to Korean Canadians. Any materials related to or created by Korean Canadians are significant to the project.

Dr Elmira Köchümkulova
University of Central Asia, Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic

Dr Elmira Köchümkulova received her undergraduate and graduate degrees from the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Washington in Seattle and is one of the leading cultural anthropologists in the region. She has edited books and authored articles on Central Asian music, oral traditions, Islam, and nomadic cultures. She has presented extensively at international conferences and lectured on Central Asian Islam, Kyrgyz musical and oral traditions, nomadic life, and funeral customs at leading universities and research centers including Harvard University's Central Asian Studies Group, the University of Chicago's Central Asian Studies Society and Zentrum Moderner Orient in Berlin. Dr Köchümkulova's research focuses on the historical and contemporary significance of traditions and customs in Turkic Central Asia. She is the co-editor of the UCA/Aga Khan Music Initiative textbook Music of Central Asia: An Introduction, contributed several chapters on Kyrgyz oral tradition and music, and taught the UCA pilot course based on the textbook. She served as scholarly editor and coordinated the production of a seminal two-volume collection Kyrgyz Küüs: Analysis, Thoughts, and Opinions. Dr Köchümkulova speaks six languages and is an accomplished musician and composer, having performed the Kyrgyz instrument, the komuz, widely across the United States and Central Asia.

"Documenting Kyrgyz Cultural Heritage" [marketplace II]
The Kyrgyz people possess rich cultural heritage and oral traditions inherited from their ancestors, who led a nomadic life until the 1930s. The legacy of nomadic traditions continues to play an important role in the cultural practices and identity of modern Kyrgyz society. I have an intimate knowledge of Kyrgyz semi-nomadic life and culture, as I was raised in a family with a long nomadic tradition. My academic research at the University of Central Asia (UCA) focuses on the study, documentation, and preservation of Central Asian/Kyrgyz cultural practices, oral tradition, and music. For the past ten years, I have been making photo and video documentation of the semi-nomadic life of contemporary Kyrgyz herders and their families in the jayloos, or summer pastures of Kyrgyzstan. At this symposium, I would like to share my own experience in Kyrgyz cultural documentation with other cultural experts and gain new knowledge on the best ways of preserving and archiving valuable cultural materials and sharing them with broader audiences.

Andy Kolovos
Vermont Folklife Center

Andy Kolovos is the Co-Director and Archivist at the Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury, VT. His professional work focuses on the application of archival methods to ethnographic collections, the role of archives in the field of folkloristics, and the management of multimedia materials in smaller repositories. He holds a PhD in Folklore and Ethnomusicology and an MLS, both from Indiana University.

"The National Folklore Archive Initiative: An Overview" [marketplace I]
This presentation will provide an overview of the National Folklore Archive Initiative (NFAI), a National Endowment for the Humanities funded project to: 1) Develop cataloging best practices for folklore archival collections, 2) Conduct a survey of folklore collections in the United States, and 3) Develop a shared, online cataloging tool and union database of folklore archives in the US. NFAI, still in its pilot phase, has pulled together collections from across the country in an effort to build a central location where the contents of these archives can be searched and discovered by researchers.

Joanne Lammers
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences/Writers'Guild Foundation

Joanne Lammers is Director of the Writers Guild Foundation Archive, where she manages the daily operations of the Foundation's special collections, which include the historical records of the Writers Guild of America, West, as well as personal papers, scripts, production material, photographs, and oral histories of prominent writers for film, television, radio and digital media. Prior to her work in archives, she was a story analyst and script consultant for twenty years at several major production companies. She currently serves on the steering committee of the Los Angeles Preservation Network and education committee of the Society of California Archivists. She received a B.S. in Radio-TV Film, Critical Studies from University of Texas, Austin and an MLIS, Archival Studies from San Jose State University.

"Beyond the Vaults: Creating a Shared Resource through Aggregation of Motion Picture Oral History Collections" [session IV]
Moving image archives are responsible for the preservation of film and video heritage. To further its preservation mission and to document the contributions of filmmakers, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences (AMPAS) has an initiative to record video oral histories with people in all film professions. These spoken accounts provide insight into the art, science, and craft of motion pictures. To ensure those stories already recorded are preserved and accessed, AMPAS is forming an oral history consortium with entertainment guilds and societies to share resources, exchange best practices and seek solutions to common problems. Using the Writers Guild Foundation's deposit agreement with AMPAS, this presentation will discuss the current form of these partnerships -- from centralized storage and cataloging to a workflow for co-production and a collective search for funding. By fostering collaboration between large and small archives, the project hopes to preserve at-risk collections and provide access to our community's voices.

""
Timothy Lloyd
Timothy Lloyd
""

Timothy Lloyd
American Folklore Society

Timothy Lloyd has served as the executive director of the American Folklore Society since 2001. His office is located at The Ohio State University in Columbus, where he also serves as Adjunct Associate Professor of English.

Before coming to the Society, Lloyd served as executive director of Cityfolk, a nationally recognized folk arts organization in Dayton, Ohio. Earlier still, he was assistant director of the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, before which he served for fourteen years as director of folk arts programs for the Ohio Arts Council. He began his career as a staff folklorist for the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

Lloyd received his PhD in American studies from The George Washington University. His research interests include American foodways, occupational culture, and the history of public practice in the field of folklore. He has published articles and reviews in the major American folklore journals, and co-authored Lake Erie Fishermen: Work, Identity and Tradition (University of Illinois Press), named the best maritime history book of 1990.

Lloyd has served as a board and committee member or consultant for many organizations. He represents the AFS within the American Council of Learned Societies, the National Humanities Alliance, UNESCO, and the World Intellectual Property Organization. In 2012 he served a Fulbright residency at the University of Jyväskylä in Finland.

"It's Bigger Than Both Of Us: The Best Argument for Working Together" [session IV]
This proverbial phrase about the difference in scale between a situation's scope and our capability to respond to it is nowhere more true than in the world of archival preservation and access. Smaller organizations lack the resources to carry out their work alone. Despite often having greater resources, larger organizations face at least equally larger problems, so the gap between goals and reality remains. Collaboration--even taking into account the additional effort that sustainable alliances demand--offers a way out of these dilemmas. In ethnographic archives in particular, there's also a cultural property and knowledge gap that collective effort can help to close. Folk and other communities are the home of the arts, knowledge, objects, performances, and skills of which archives hold the documentary record, so each partner in this pair needs the other to provide the richest possible context, and the assurance that the records of a critical moment will be kept safe and available over time. Presenters in this session will share case-study reports on a variety of collaborations that are helping to cut problems down to size and to build productive alliances with promise for the future.

Noel Lobley
Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford, UK

Noel Lobley is an ethnomusicologist, DJ and sound curator. His research interests include the nature, history and contemporary relevance of ethnomusicological and commercial recordings of African music, and the relationship between ethnomusicology and sound studies. His particular focus is on applied ethnomusicology and the potential relationships between collections of recordings and local musicians. He is working as a Research Associate at The Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford where he is developing the museum's sound and music collections.

"Sound Archives, Communities, and Collaboration" [session I]
Drawing on my applied sound archiving projects with two major music collections from sub-Saharan Africa, Hugh Tracey's The Sound of Africa series and Louis Sarno's Bayaka archive, I will discuss creative and collaborative ways for recordings to circulate among source communities, especially using their own local social mechanisms. I will explain my method of 'sound elicitation': finding ways to circulate archival Xhosa recordings among urban Xhosa communities in the Eastern Cape of South Africa to inspire, collect and share responses to musical, cultural and political change. I will also explain my current practical research with the world's largest archive of Bayaka field recordings—currently circulating online, in museum gallery spaces, and beyond—to promote new international listening engagements, raising awareness of major social problems facing a marginalized community. I will consider ways of creating responsible and reciprocal relationships between academic institutions and Bayaka communities requesting offline access to their archived recordings.

Colby Maddox
Old Town School of Folk Music

Colby Maddox has been the Manager of the Old Town School of Folk Music's library and archive since 1999 where he works with published recordings, books and video recordings, as well as unpublished live concert recordings of performances presented at the School. In 1999, after the School had completed a move to the former Hild Library, he brought the Resource Center out of storage, and has since enjoyed creating and maintaining a working library and archive with Old Town's unique holdings.

"Old Town School Call Numbers: What's in a Name?" [session II]
Old Town School has created a successful, genera-based system to describe its folk music collections to 250 teachers and 7,000 students who require a non-academic, consumer-friendly access model. Five main genres were identified in Old Town's collection (North American Roots, Celtic, Folk, World and Pop) and laid out thirty-one subgenres under the mains. Larger geographic areas in the World genera (European, Latin) were also assigned country codes. Call numbers are created by combining genre, subgenera, country code, subject, item number and media type. For example, our third Victor Jara LP would be coded WlaCsJaraV3-LP. By viewing, hearing or repeating these call numbers, a patron receives all the necessary information to locate materials. MP3 copies of the each archival Old Town School concert recording are stamped with their associated metadata. Soon our patrons will be able to access archival recordings digitally using the same friendly and familiar terms as our consumer materials.

Maurice Mengel
University of Cologne, Germany

Maurice Mengel is a doctoral candidate at the Universität zu Köln. From
2004 until 2010 he worked in the Ethnomusicology Department of the Ethnological Museum in Berlin, also known as the Berlin Phonogram Archive. In this capacity, he worked on several digital library projects. He is currently finishing his dissertation, a history of ideas on the Institut de Etnografie Si Folclor 'Constantin Brăiloiu' in Bucharest. Apart from the history of ethnomusicology (inside and outside Romania), he is interested in the cultural policy, methodology of ethnomusicology, semiotics, and music and politics.

"Essay Concerning the Digital Revolution and the State of Digitization: How Ethnomusicology Archives Have to Do More with Less" [session III]
Since the beginning of the digital era, accelerated by the unexpected success of the Internet, ethnomusicology archives (and other audiovisual research archives) have experienced radical change. Today, the goal of "total digitization" is widely accepted. Digital catalogs, recordings, and accompanying documents, as well as digital access to archive resources (e.g. via the Internet), are necessities for nearly all archives. The digital archive should allow us to preserve our collections practically forever and our documents should be better and more easily accessible than ever before. But instead many archives still struggle with the implementation of new technologies and, in some senses, they provide less service today than they used to. In this paper, I will provide an opinionated, selective, subjective, and perhaps provocative analysis of the situation, and offer some possible remedies, focusing on the involvement of decision makers and the expertise of archive personnel.

Rachel Menyuk
National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution

Rachel Menyuk is an archives technician at the National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center, where she is responsible for processing and providing access to manuscript and photo collections. Rachel received her master's degree from New York University and previously worked there as a graduate assistant at the Tamiment/Wagner Labor archives.

"Community Input through Social Media in NMAI Archive Center" [session II]
This presentation will briefly introduce case studies in which social media have provided a venue for Native users to contribute cultural knowledge to the description of archival collections. The National Museum of the American Indian's (NMAI) Archive Center provides services to a wide range of researchers, including Native American community members whose families and tribes are represented in our collections. Traditionally, the Archive Center has communicated with community members through email and phone conversations as well as through museum programming. Tribal members and NMAI's archive staff work together to identify knowledge gaps and culturally sensitive materials. Recently, archive staff has begun to engage Native constituents through social media outlets. For Native community members who are unable to travel to the museum, these outlets provide access to and interaction with materials otherwise unavailable. This presentation will touch on both the benefits and complications inherent in these new media relationships.

""
Melanie Meyers
Melanie Meyers
""

Melanie Meyers
Center for Jewish History

Melanie Meyers is the Senior Reference Services Librarian for Special Collections at The Center for Jewish History, New York City, where she oversees all aspects of unified special collections reference for five partner organizations, with approximately 500,000 books and thousands of linear feet of archival collections under her reference supervision. She has been working with archives and manuscript materials since 2002 in a variety of settings, including substantial experience in both archival processing and public services at private, non-profit, and academic institutions. She frequently teaches to various constituent groups, has overseen a pilot project to use iPads for special collections reference, and has published two articles related to reference and archival practice. Additionally, she has presented at the SAA annual conference, as well as at the RBMS (Rare Book and Manuscript Section, American Library Association) annual pre-conference. She received her MLS with a concentration in rare books and special collections in 2004 from the Palmer School of Library Science, Long Island University, and is currently completing her MA in American history from Hunter College, City University of New York.

"'Shared Services' in Archival Settings: Diverse Approaches to Collaboration" [session V]
This session is a wealth of intriguing case studies on different approaches to collaboration, created by forging novel relationships among individuals, institutions, and communities. As these papers ably demonstrate, there are many different approaches to these mutually beneficial activities, and a wealth of avenues by which small-to-medium-sized institutions can pool their resources for projects benefitting both the institutions and their communities. In the case of The Center for Jewish History, our contribution to this discussion was the creation of a unified public services consortium for five organizations, called "shared services." This approach allows for one point of contact for archival patrons, and removes the responsibility of all aspects of public services from the partners, freeing them to concentrate on collection development. This unorthodox approach has been very successful from both a patron and a staff perspective, and is presented as a model of resource sharing and collaboration for the benefit of all involved.

Caroline Muglia
North Carolina State University

Caroline Muglia is the Assistant Director of The Lebanese in North Carolina Project. She was a contract archivist at the Library of Congress' Manuscript Division and is currently a Data Librarian at Academic Benchmarks, a data services provider to K-12 education. She received dual master's degrees at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in history and library science. She will be featured in Library Juice's forthcoming anthology Informed Agitation: Library and Information Skills in Social Movements and Beyond.

"Sourcing Participatory Archives: the Lebanese in North Carolina Project" [session V]
Housed at North Carolina State University, The Lebanese in North Carolina Project seeks to educate a diverse public on the historical experiences of Arab Americans in the American South from 1890 to today, and to research questions of memory and history, transmigration and marginalization. Since 2010, the Project has maintained a digital library that serves as an archival resource for Lebanese-Arab community members, students and researchers. Letters, family trees, photographs, naturalization records, census data, newspaper clippings, home movies, and oral histories, all donated by community members, have been converted to sustainable electronic formats and housed in the project's digital library. This community supported project's collaborations illustrate an unprecedented relationship building around a public history and archival endeavor located at a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) university. Working with numerous departments, the daily outreach, source creation, and collection development done with the Lebanese community reflects a model of interdisciplinary engagement and blurs the line between archive, user, and community.

Kathleen Murray
University of North Texas Libraries

Kathleen Murray is a postdoctoral research associate at the University of North Texas Libraries. Since 2000, she has conducted user studies for state and national digital library and Web archiving projects. Most recently she was project manager and a principal researcher for two research projects funded by National Leadership Grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services: Optimizing the User Experience in a Rapid Development Framework (2007-2009), and Classification of the End-of-Term Web Archive (2009-2012).

"Where Do Users Find Value?" [session I]
Murray and Belden conducted research that explored the impact and value of digitized resources for users of the Portal to Texas History, a collaborative digital library. The range of primary-source materials includes maps, books, manuscripts, newspapers, diaries, photographs, and letters from the unique collections of 250 partners at Texas libraries, museums, archives, historical societies, genealogical societies, and private families. A common framework of impact value areas included: economic, social, educational, cultural, political, environmental, organizational, and operational. Using a common framework made it possible to conceptually organize findings from several data sources, including a survey, citation analysis, usage statistics, and user-submitted comments. The study discovered interesting results from the demographics of Portal users, and challenged assumptions we had about who these users would be.

""
Jennifer O'Neal
Jennifer O'Neal
""

Jennifer O'Neal
University of Oregon Special Collections and Archives

Jennifer R. O'Neal, member of The Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, is the Corrigan Solari University Historian and Archivist at the University of Oregon Special Collections and Archives, where she manages the University Archives collections, oversees the department's instruction program, and serves as an advisor on tribal community projects. She earned a master's degree in library science from the University of Arizona as part of the Knowledge River program, and also has a master's degree in history from Utah State University. She is currently completing a PhD in History from Georgetown University. Previously, she served as the Head Archivist for the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of the American Indian Archive Center. She has held prior archival positions at the U.S. Department of State, Princeton University, the University of Arizona, and Utah State University. She currently serves on various groups in the Society of American Archivists, including the Native American Archives Roundtable (Chair) and the Cultural Heritage Working Group (Co-Chair), as well as serving on the Advisory Board for the Association of Tribal Archives, Libraries, and Museums. In 2006 she participated in drafting the best practices for the respectful care and use of Native American archival materials, which produced the Protocols for Native American Archival Materials. Her research interests include international indigenous activism, cultural heritage, traditional knowledge, intellectual property rights, and digital humanities.

"Awakening Ideas: Engagement and Collaboration between Cultural Heritage Collections and Users" [session I]
Cultural heritage archive collections contain unique materials that document specific aspects of a culture's history, traditions, languages, and contemporary community-based initiatives. These collections serve as valuable tools for preserving collective memory and knowledge that brings increased power to source communities. While significant attention has historically been placed on the acquisition, management, and organization of these materials, it is critical that focus is also turned toward the actual users of these collections and how repositories can actively engage with a variety of users--including academics, undergrads, researchers, the general public, and most importantly, source communities. Networking with a variety of users regarding archival collections ensures that the materials are presented to a wide range of viewpoints to capture and enhance data. In addition, collaborations between repositories and users bring new innovative uses of collections that highlight the importance of cultural heritage materials among source communities, as well as to others interested in the collections.

Kate Pourshariati
University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

Kate Pourshariati is the film archivist for the Penn Museum, where she works with a range of culturally and historically significant motion picture films, dating from 1913 to the 1990s. Kate has supervised restoration of (perhaps) the first documentary sound film Matto Grosso, the Great Brazilian Wilderness (1931), and Native Life in the Philippines (1913) and with the LoC the seminal series Navajo Film Themselves (1966). In addition to the cataloging, restoration and digitization of films, she has been working with source communities to share back the Museum's historic film materials for re-interpretation and revision.

"Native Life in the Philippines (1913), reconsidered from inside and outside" [marketplace II]
Native Life in the Philippines (1913) was a propaganda film created by former U.S. Secretary of the Interior Dean C. Worcester in 1912/13. We now understand that his intent was to demonstrate that the people of the Philippine islands were too "primitive" to rule themselves. We learned that the only known elements of this film were in our Museum's archives when Dr. Mark Rice viewed the footage online at archive.org, and alerted us to its historical importance. Our current digital repatriation project involves Filipino filmmaker Nick DeOcampo in an effort to return the footage to the communities from which it was taken, so that it can be reinterpreted according to those communities' standards.

Timothy B. Powell
American Philosophical Society

Timothy B. Powell is the Director of Native American Projects at the American Philosophical Society and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. His area of specialization is large scale digitization projects that enhance cultural revitalization projects in indigenous communities. He is currently working with the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Penobscot Nation, Tuscarora Nation, and Ojibwe bands in the US and First Nations in Canada. He is the editor of the Gibagadinamaagoom: An Ojibwe Digital Archive website.

"The Digital Knowledge Sharing Initiative at the American Philosophical Society" [session IV]
The American Philosophical Society has recently established a new Digital Knowledge Sharing Initiative, funded by the Mellon Foundation, to digitize its entire Native American audio collection, totaling more than three thousand hours. As part of the grant project, the APS is working with four groups: the Tuscarora Nation, the Penobscot Nation, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, and Ojibwe communities in both the US and Canada. The APS set up a Native American Fellows program that allows tribal historians, teachers, and elders to come to the APS to select material to be digitized for cultural revitalization. The initiative also pays for the project director to visit each of the communities twice a year. A Native American advisory board is developing protocols that will ensure that culturally sensitive materials are not placed on the internet or even reproduced, although anyone who comes to the library can view the materials.

Raymond Pun
New York Public Library

Raymond Pun is a reference librarian at New York Public Library's General Research Division, where he provides reference and research services in the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building. He holds an MLS from CUNY Queens College, as well as a BA in History and an MA in East Asian studies from St. John's University. A frequent speaker and a Library Journal Mover and Shaker 2012, he has appeared at Social Media Week, the MIT Visualizing Asia Conference, the American Library Association Conference, and the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Canada. He has also published articles in The Huffington Post, World History Bulletin, College and Research Libraries, and elsewhere.

"Reimagining New York's Chinatown: Chatham's Hidden Archives, Labor History, and Community Stories" [marketplace II]
This presentation explores one of the Library's hidden archival gems: the Chatham archives held in one of NYPL's branch library: Chatham Square in Chinatown, New York. Known as the Chinese Heritage Collection, a unique collection of ephemeral materials in English and Chinese, the archive provides a unique look at Chinese American activism and labor movements in New York during the 20th century. The presentation discusses how these resources can be used for multidisciplinary research by various audiences, from community activists to historians. The presentation looks closely at some of the content in these documents and draws on the nexus of community history, memory and archives of Chinatown.

Janel Quirante
'Ulu'ulu, the Henry Ku'ualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive, University of Hawai'i - West O'ahu

Janel Quirante is the Head Archivist at 'Ulu'ulu: The Henry Ku'ualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive of Hawai'i, the official state archive for moving images. She oversees the daily operations of the archive, which is dedicated to the care, preservation, and digitization of film and videotape related to the history and culture of Hawai’i. Janel worked as a videotape preservation technician at the Bay Area Video Coalition in San Francisco and as the Visual Materials Archivist at the Hoover Institution Archives at Stanford University before joining 'Ulu'ulu in 2010.

"Preserving Hawai'i's Moving Image History through Digital Archiving: A Case Study" [session III]
The Pilot Project (2009-2011) of 'Ulu'ulu: The Henry Ku'ualoha Giugni Moving Image Archive of Hawai'i was a collaborative effort with local museums, archives, libraries, television stations and independent producers to create a representative digital collection of Hawaiian film and video. Using specialized software and digitizing equipment found nowhere else in Hawai'i, 'Ulu'ulu developed and tested standard processes for cataloging, preservation, and access of archival moving images and implemented them in a way that makes sense for Hawai'i's unique preservation challenges. This presentation documents the digitization of over 350 hours of culturally and historically significant Hawaiian footage from 1928 to 1998, and offers a model for organizations undertaking similar projects.

""
Sita Reddy
Sita Reddy
""

Sita Reddy
Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Smithsonian Institution

Sita Reddy is a Research Associate affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution's Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage. A cultural sociologist of science with a PhD from the University of Pennsylvania and a master's degree in museum studies from George Washington University, her current work lies at the intersections of critical heritage studies, archival histories, and traditional medical knowledge from South Asia. She has published and presented on topics from global heritage policy to the repatriation of art, antiquities, music, and medicine, while her curatorial experience includes exhibitions organized by the Sackler Gallery (Yoga: The Art of Transformation), the National Library of Medicine (Visible Proofs), and Provisions Library, a DC-based resource center for arts and social change. She also teaches international heritage studies, currently through the Michigan in Washington program, and in 2014, as a visiting professor at the University of Hyderabad, where she will collaborate on an alternative museology curriculum through arts documentation.

"Whose Heritage? Refiguring the Botanical Archive in the 21st Century" [keynote II]
Archives have been seen as preservers of memory, heritage, and the past. This presentation questions this orthodoxy, relying on ways in which botanical archives may construct but also bury colonial pasts, just as they ignore indigenous communities whose knowledge constitutes these archives. Digitization of botanical texts in the twenty-first century, even as it aims to preserve cultural and natural heritage, leads to a series of unintended consequences on issues of access and ownership, opening these archives to new problems of bioprospecting, cultural appropriation, and patent claims that dictate archival futures, trajectories and biographies.

My case in point is an extraordinary seventeenth-century Dutch colonial botanical from the Malabar (present day Kerala, India) – Hortus Indicus Malabaricus -- described as the oldest intangible natural heritage archive in Asia. A monumental twelve-volume project compiled in collaboration with indigenous plant collectors and physicians, Hortus Malabaricus tells a powerful cultural heritage story: it is at once art object, scientific archive, and ethnographic record of cultural encounters between colonial center and Indian periphery. It is also a cautionary tale about indigenous medico-botanical knowledge in which the protagonists tragically ended up being written out of history.

The presentation will trace moments in the four-hundred-year history of Hortus Malabaricus, to show how translation into English and subsequent digitization in the wake of the 2003 UNESCO Convention creates unprecedented heritage dilemmas about the public display and repatriation of knowledge. Historicizing the archive reveals multiple ways in which heritage itself can be politicized – as colonial tool, scientific text, national icon, or even global heritage that belongs to all humanity.

Cecilia Lizama Salvatore
Graduate School of Library and Information Science, Dominican University, River Forest, Illinois

Cecilia Lizama Salvatore has taught librarianship, archives, and cultural heritage management at the University of Guam, Emporia State University, and Dominican University, and has served as Guam's Territorial Librarian/Archivist. Salvatore earned her PhD from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research interest is on the cultural heritage resources management of the United States protectorates in the Pacific, particularly Guam and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

"Students and Community Archives Staff Together in Education and Training in Cultural Heritage Resources Management" [session VI]
Community archives often turn to students in Library and Information Science (LIS) programs for assistance with their collections. LIS students, however, often prefer the opportunities provided by larger institutions, which usually include practice in advanced technology; in fact, the guidelines for graduate internships set by educational institutions are more aligned with the opportunities provided by these larger archival institutions. Through newly developed courses on cultural heritage resources management and field experience at Dominican University, students: 1) work closely with community archives staff towards a mutual understanding of what standard archival principles and concepts are and how they may be or may not be applicable to the diverse resources in community archives; 2) gain an appreciation for the diversity of resources in cultural heritage institutions; 3) develop methods and processes that are more relevant to these resources; and 4) develop recommendations on how staff can continue the work needed for the archives.

Teague Schneiter
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences/Writers'Guild Foundation

Teague Schneiter is the Manager of Oral History Projects for the Academy Foundation, overseeing the identification and acquisition of at-risk audiovisual oral history collections to ensure their preservation, as well as production of new video-recorded oral histories, in fulfillment of the larger goal of providing access to filmmaker voices within the Academy's forthcoming Motion Picture Museum. Prior to working at the Academy, she served as the Visual History Archivist at the Directors Guild of America and International Outreach/Archives Consultant for IsumaTV. Schneiter has presented at conferences in the U.S., the Netherlands and Australia, and her ongoing work within audiovisual preservation and access has seen her writing published in the Institute for Network Cultures volume Video Vortex Reader II: Moving Image Beyond YouTube. Schneiter received a BA in film & digital media from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a master's degree in preservation and presentation of the moving image from the University of Amsterdam.

"Beyond the Vaults: Creating a Shared Resource through Aggregation of Motion Picture Oral History Collections" [session IV]
Moving image archives are responsible for the preservation of film and video heritage. To further its preservation mission and to document the contributions of filmmakers, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences (AMPAS) has an initiative to record video oral histories with people in all film professions. These spoken accounts provide insight into the art, science, and craft of motion pictures. To ensure those stories already recorded are preserved and accessed, AMPAS is forming an oral history consortium with entertainment guilds and societies to share resources, exchange best practices and seek solutions to common problems. Using the Writers Guild Foundation's deposit agreement with AMPAS, this presentation will discuss the current form of these partnerships -- from centralized storage and cataloging to a workflow for co-production and a collective search for funding. By fostering collaboration between large and small archives, the project hopes to preserve at-risk collections and provide access to our community's voices.

Laura Schnitker
University of Maryland Libraries

Laura Schnitker is the Sound Archivist and Ethnomusicologist in Special Collections in Mass Media & Culture at the University of Maryland Libraries. She has music degrees from the University of Michigan (BM), Tufts University (MA) and the University of Maryland (PhD). She is currently archiving the campus radio station WMUC, in addition to curating the exhibit Saving College Radio: WMUC Past, Present and Future. She also teaches an undergraduate course in world popular musics, and hosts a weekly radio show on WMUC called The Bohemian Challenge.

"Saving College Radio" [marketplace I]
The University of Maryland's Special Collections is proud to present a new exhibit entitled Saving College Radio: WMUC Past, Present and Future, located in the Maryland Room Gallery at Hornbake Library. The title reflects a two-pronged approach in which "saving" refers to our efforts to archive this historical collection, as well as the importance of maintaining support for the campus station. The variety of materials in the WMUC collection is extensive, and includes photographs, fliers, 'zines, vertical files, correspondences and audiovisual formats. The Digital Conversion and Media Reformatting (DCMR) division has been integrating standard procedures with innovative approaches in order to preserve the content and make it accessible to patrons and alumni. This poster will illustrate how these practices have facilitated a deeper understanding of and appreciation for the campus radio station, while improving the UMD Libraries' standards of preservation and digital stewardship.

Bina Sengar
Department of History and AIC, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad, India

Bina Sengar is Assistant Professor in history and specializes in marginalized and indigenous peoples' history in South Asia. She is currently working on the themes of rural South Asian history since 2000. She largely emphasizes oral traditions and folk knowledge in the writing of history. She is also developing a digital archives for the rural aspects of South Asia through www.ruralsouthasia.org where she is collaborating with group support from various national and international research academic and social welfare organizations.

"Archiving Rural South Asian Heritage" [marketplace II]
The traditional knowledge, oral testimonies and skills passed on from one generation to another through day to day living can be called as 'Folklife.' People who travel outside their communities of origin for a living miss out on opportunities to absorb these folk knowledge bases, and gradually these abilities tend to get dissociated from our community upbringing. Documenting folk traditions that are threatened by fast development and urbanization, therefore, is essential to archiving and conserving our folk knowledge and traditions. The developing economies of South Asia and expanding urban spaces are largely overwhelming the rural spaces, leaving meager scope for the sustenance and upkeep of rural folk traditions. Although in the past some attempts were made to archive or document these folk traditions, those efforts have not been sufficient. This presentation will introduce ruralsouthasia.org, a website attempting to fill this need.

Holly Smith
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Holly Smith started working at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill in July 2008, as the Overholser Archival Fellow for African American Studies. She is currently the African American Materials Specialist for the Southern Historical Collection (SHC) in Wilson Library. In this capacity, she works to expand and facilitate better access to African American related archival materials in the SHC. This includes updating online guides, curating exhibitions, managing public programming, and collaborating with campus and community organizations for various projects. She has participated in several conference presentations, including a panel at the 2010 Librarians' Association at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conference, entitled The African American Documentary Resources Portal: A Case Study in the Creation and Sustainability of a Community Research and Outreach Tool. Additionally, Ms. Smith has an extensive background in public history, having volunteered and worked for the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation from elementary school to college as a historic interpreter, primarily focusing on African American history and life.

"Intersections between Community, Collaboration, and Education: Project RIGHT Now and the Preservation of African American History" [session VI]
Project RIGHT (Research, Identify, and Gather Historical Treasures) Now – Carolinas! (PRNC) is a volunteer consulting group consisting of professionally trained archivists, public historians, librarians and graduate students from underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds. Founded in 2011, PRNC works in partnership with communities from North Carolina and South Carolina to study and preserve local African American history. Members of the group actively pursue scholarly investigations of all facets of the life and work of individuals, organizations, and cultural institutions. In addition, PRNC provides educational outreach, workshops, and programs to help communities identify, preserve, and develop primary source collections held both publicly and privately. Examples of PRNC projects include a workshop entitled "Preserving the History of St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church," held at St. Paul Church in Chapel Hill, NC; and an oral history project with alumni of the Russell School, the only surviving Rosenwald-funded school building remaining in Durham County.

D. A. Sonneborn
Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, Smithsonian Institution

D. A. Sonneborn has composed new music for theater, film, and dance in the United States and Western Europe, taught piano, and managed and produced concerts, festivals, artists and over two hundred albums. His articles, reviews, liner notes, and photos appear in scholarly publications, and he co-authored Planet Drum (1991) with drummer Mickey Hart and Fredric Lieberman. He lectures internationally on applied ethnomusicology, and has taught undergraduate and graduate courses. Chairman of the Society for Ethnomusicology's Audio-Visual Committee, he's a founding member of its Applied Ethnomusicology Section, and a member of the International Council for Traditional Music. He holds a PhD in music from UCLA.

"Sound Returns: Challenged Stories from an Audio Archive"
This is a case study of Smithsonian Folkways Recordings, a collection originating with a 1987 acquisition of the over two thousand albums of Folkways Records & Service Corporation, its copyrights and other property, and ten other collections since. It is a "museum of sound," at once the dissemination instrument of an archival collection of traditional music and recorded sound from all over the world, and a nonprofit record label, housed in the U.S. national museum. With duties to keep its catalogue available in perpetuity, a mandate to pay its own way, and a mission of cultural documentation, Smithsonian Folkways practices digital repatriation (of audio recordings), and circulation of indigenous knowledge (through publication, payment of royalties and license fees). The presentation will offer models for redistributing individual artists' and their communities' rights to control use of their music, even when legal ownership may remain with the institution.

Tim Thompson
University of Miami Libraries

Tim Thompson has been a Metadata Librarian at the University of Miami Libraries since 2012. His responsibilities include metadata creation for archival material in Spanish, and his interests include developing tools and strategies for repurposing archival metadata, as well as exploring global perspectives on research and practice in the digital humanities.

"Experimenting Locally with Encoded Archival Context - Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF): Moving toward Linked Archival Metadata?" [session II]
Although standards such as Encoded Archival Description (EAD) have helped make finding aids more visible and accessible, there is another layer that often remains hidden to researchers: the sociocultural context of the people and institutions whose work is preserved in archival collections. Archivists, librarians, and institutions can benefit from experimenting locally with Encoded Archival Context – Corporate Bodies, Persons, and Families (EAC-CPF), the emerging standard for capturing this context, and from exploring its potential as a heuristic tool that can help them rethink their descriptive practice in creative ways. This presentation will discuss our personal experience creating EAC-CPF records and the reasons we believe it is a worthwhile endeavor. EAC-CPF promises to improve access to archival collections. In addition to its practical application, it also provides archivists and librarians with a way to engage their collections in new ways, helping them reconceptualize the metadata they have created.

Diane Thram
International Library of African Music, Rhodes University, South Africa

Diane Thram has a PhD in Ethnomusicology from Indiana University (1999), and works as an Associate Professor and Director of the International Library of African Music (ILAM), a heritage archive and research institute at Rhodes University in South Africa. Her research has focused on music and indigenous religion in Southern Africa, media control in Zimbabwe, and South African jazz. She edits ILAM's accredited academic journal, African Music, and directs ILAM research and repatriation initiatives, including the ILAM-Red Location Music History Project, and the ILAM Music Heritage Project SA. The latter repatriation initiative produced the publications Understanding African Music for grades 10-12 (2012) and Listen and Learn-Music Made Easy for grades 7-9 (2013), edited by Thram. She curated the traveling museum exhibit For Future Generations - Hugh Tracey and the International Library of African Music (2010) and the permanent Generations of Jazz exhibit (2013) of the ILAM-Red Location Music History Project. Catalogues edited by Thram accompany both exhibits.

"Archives, Heritage Activism, and Cultural Vitality: Sustaining African Musical Heritage Through Outreach and Education" [marketplace II]
The founder of the International Library of African Music (ILAM), Hugh Tracey (1903-1977) was known for his wish to develop textbooks to teach African music in African schools as a way to keep the heritage alive. His vision prompted the ILAM Music Heritage Project SA and the publication of two textbooks, Understanding African Music (2012) and Listen and Learn – Music Made Easy (2013). The textbooks generously utilize ILAM recordings and images and provide a vehicle to return Hugh Tracey's field recordings to communities through the schools. Each book is accompanied by a DVD of music examples from ILAM's archive, and teachers are encouraged to transfer those examples to students' cell-phones to promote actual engagement with their music heritage and creative projects using the recordings. This presentation addresses how the ILAM Music Heritage Project SA is an act of heritage activism that disseminates ILAM's holdings through the schools as a method of repatriation, education in African music, and archival practice in promotion of cultural vitality.

Nicole Topich
Center for American Political Studies, Harvard University

Nicole Topich is the Project Archivist at the Center for American Studies, Harvard University, where she coordinates the Digital Archive of Massachusetts Anti-Slavery and Anti-Segregation Petitions. She has assisted a variety of archives and libraries over the past five years, including the Clinton Presidential Library, the Library of Congress, and the University of Pennsylvania Libraries. She completed her MLIS through the University of Pittsburgh in August 2013. Her interests include American legal histories in the 18th and 19th centuries, digital humanities, and new forms of access to archives.

"Digital Archive of Massachusetts Anti-Slavery and Anti-Segregation Petitions" [session II]
The Center for American Political Studies at Harvard University was awarded a Humanities Collections and Reference Resources Foundation grant in 2012 from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant is funding a digital archive of anti-slavery and anti-segregation petitions sent to the Massachusetts state legislature in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Work on the project began in January 2013 and it is expected that 4,000 to 6,000 petitions will be cataloged and digitized from the Massachusetts State Archives for the project, which has a planned release date of June 2015. The results will include an interactive map with connections to statistical and geographical data, along with transcriptions of signatory names and text. This presentation will discuss the benefits of cross-institutional partnerships to increase access through digital collections and ensure preservation of the physical materials. The detailed cataloging will also allow new forms of use and access to the documents, including data and textual analysis that exposes their relevance to broader fields of study and researchers.

Emanuel Valentin
Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Italy

Emanuel Valentin is a social and cultural anthropologist. His research includes work on ritual and social change in migrant communities, demographic change, and regional development. His interest in intangible cultural heritage derives from his research in the project E.CH.I. Italo-Swiss Ethnographies for the Valorization of Intangible Heritage on behalf of the Museum Ladin Ćiastel de Tor in South Tyrol, Italy, which was carried out between 2010 and 2012. At the moment, he is continuing his research on cultural heritage as a PhD candidate at the Faculty of Education of the Free University of Bozen-Bolzano.

"Intangible Search: Experiences from the Project E.CH.I. Italo-Swiss Ethnographies for the Valorization of Intangible Heritage" [session VI]
The Interreg project, E.CH.I. Italo-Swiss Ethnographies for the Valorization of Intangible Heritage, builds on the 2003 UNESCO convention for the safeguarding of intangible heritage, adopted in 2007 by Italy and in 2008 by Switzerland. In this project, seven partner institutions from Italy and Switzerland coped with the challenges of identifying and documenting intangible cultural expressions in the border area between the two countries. In order to create a common denominator in the methodological approach, a series of workshops were organized, dedicated to audio and video cataloging techniques but also to techniques of documentation. An important instrument of standardization was developed for this, namely an internet-based inventory, in which all project partners cataloged the documentation they produced. The inventory, which counted 196 documentations in March 2013, can be viewed online under the name "Intangible Search." My presentation will focus on insights gathered during the E.CH.I. project and the development of such a common inventory.

John Vallier
University of Washington

John Vallier is a librarian and archivist at the University of Washington Libraries in Seattle, where he develops, preserves, and provides access to audio, video, and film collections. Before UW, John was archivist at the UCLA Ethnomusicology Archive (2002-2006), a Junior Fellow at the American Folklife Center (2001), and a drummer for various sonic projects.

"Collaborative Archiving out West: Celebrations and Frustrations" [session IV]
With this presentation I offer an overview of collaborative efforts I have been involved with at UCLA and the University of Washington. My projects have included working with musicians and community-based non-profits to document and preserve their recorded cultural heritage; and collaborating with faculty, students, archivists, and record companies to balance the sometimes competing demands of open access and rights. I will point out what has worked and what hasn't, highlighting situations in which archival collaboration has led to frustration and, ultimately, mutual understanding and celebration.

""
Steven M. Weiss
Steven M. Weiss
""

Steven M. Weiss
Southern Folklife Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Steven Weiss is Curator of the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he oversees administration, collection development, and preservation. Steven is currently working on From the Peidmont to the Swamplands: Preserving Southern Traditional Music, a three-year preservation and access grant funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities. Steven attended the Berklee College of Music where he studied jazz trumpet and music production and engineering. He holds a bachelor of science in audio technology from American University and master of information and library studies from the University of Michigan. He has helped produce a number of recordings for Smithsonian Folkways, Northwest Folklife and the Southern Folklife Collection. Prior to coming to UNC, Steven worked for the Motion Picture, Sound and Video Branch of National Archives and Records Administration and CNN's Washington, D.C., bureau library and archives.

"Writ Large: Description and Discovery in the Southern Folklife Collection" [session II]
A case study from the Southern Folklife Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill on the archival description of published country music song folios. The description of this collection allowed us to explore questions of "who is our audience" and "how best to reach them" in a digital age when the pressure is on for re-inventing processing workflows.

Lizeth Zepeda
Arizona Historical Society Library and Archives

Lizeth Zepeda is currently pursuing her master's degree at the University of Arizona's School of Information Resources and Library Science (SIRLS) where she is a Knowledge River Scholar (Cohort Eleven). She is a library/archives intern at the Arizona Historical Society in Tucson, Arizona. For her undergraduate studies she double majored in psychology and women's, gender, and sexuality studies at California State University, Long Beach. Her interests include an intersectional approach to race, class, gender, and sexuality with regards to archiving. Additionally, she plans to focus on uncovering erased and ignored histories of communities of queer people of color.

"Visible Culture, Enduring Memory: Sharing Historic Photos of Arizona's Mexican Heritage with the Digital Generation" [marketplace II]
Recent conflicts over banning of ethnic studies illustrate how southern Arizona's rich cultural heritage has come under attack by efforts to contest or marginalize community memory and cultural history. This poster session focuses on a project designed to share online hundreds of important cultural heritage photographs, which richly illustrate Arizona's Mexican cultural heritage. Archivist Alexandria Caster, noting that diverse photographs collected by the groundbreaking Mexican Heritage Project in the 1980s offered a powerful window on community memory, began a project to offer the digital generation worldwide access to these images. A Library Services and Technology Act (LSTA) grant provided support for a new digital exhibit of hundreds of photos now online at the Arizona Memory Project. This poster highlights efforts of project manager Alexandria Caster and Lizeth Zepeda, Knowledge River Graduate Assistant, with regards to digitization, exhibit creation, and outreach efforts to bring community members closer to this vital cultural heritage archive.

 

  Back to Top

 

 home >> events >> cultural heritage archives >>biographies & abstracts

A - Z Index
  The Library of Congress >> Research Centers
   October 29, 2014
Legal | External Link Disclaimer

Contact Us:
Ask a Librarian