Format Audio Recordings
Contributors Cook, Robert
Cook, Robert Harrison
Kennedy, Stetson
Roberts, Wilbur
Dates 1940
Location Florida
Riviera
United States
Language English
Subjects [Gospel Hall]
Bahamian Americans
British Americans
Conch Songs
Ethnography
Field Recordings
Music
Palm Beach County
Riviera, Florida
Songs
Vocals
Title
Blackem Boogey
Description
Field Recordings. Songs. sound recording | 1 sound disc ( 55 seconds) : analog ; 12 in. | A Conch song learned in the Bahamas. This song is about a man who lived all his life in the Bahamas without telling his name. Even when he grew up and married and had children, no one knew what his name was. Every day when the man went to the well to draw water, he would look at his reflection in the well and would sing the first two lines of the song. His children would stand behind him and when they heard him sing the first two lines, they would sing the third line, and he replied with the last line. The singer, an 84-year-old blind man, was born in the Bahamas and emigrated to Florida ca. 1911. The term "Conch," while now more widely used to refer to a native of Key West, Florida, originally referred to British settlers of the Bahama Islands who later emigrated to South Florida. The unique accent of the Conchs--a mixture of British and Bahamian Performance Note: "Blackem Boogey" (vocals) performed by Wilbur Roberts at Gospel Hall, Riviera, Florida, on January 16, 1940. Sound Recording (Form). Sound Disc (Form).
Contributor Names
Roberts, Wilbur (performer)
Kennedy, Stetson (collector)
Cook, Robert Harrison (collector)
Roberts, Wilbur (speaker)
Kennedy, Stetson (speaker)
Created / Published
Riviera, Florida, 1940-01-16.
Subject Headings
-  Bahamian Americans
-  British Americans
-  Bahamian Americans -- Music
-  United States -- Florida -- Riviera -- place of recording
Genre
Field recordings
Songs
Notes
-  A Conch song learned in the Bahamas. This song is about a man who lived all his life in the Bahamas without telling his name. Even when he grew up and married and had children, no one knew what his name was. Every day when the man went to the well to draw water, he would look at his reflection in the well and would sing the first two lines of the song. His children would stand behind him and when they heard him sing the first two lines, they would sing the third line, and he replied with the last line.
-  The singer, an 84-year-old blind man, was born in the Bahamas and emigrated to Florida ca. 1911.
-  The term "Conch," while now more widely used to refer to a native of Key West, Florida, originally referred to British settlers of the Bahama Islands who later emigrated to South Florida. The unique accent of the Conchs--a mixture of British and Bahamian
-  Performance Note: "Blackem Boogey" (vocals) performed by Wilbur Roberts at Gospel Hall, Riviera, Florida, on January 16, 1940.
Form
sound recording
sound disc
Extent
1 sound disc ( 55 seconds) : analog ; 12 in.
Repository
AFC 1939/013: AFS 03378 B03 DLC-AFC American Folklife Center, Library of Congress
Other Formats
http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/ihas/loc.afc.afcflwpa.3378b3/mets.xml
Access Condition
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