Film, Video A Buckaroo Conversation after a Morning's Work

Format Film, Video
Contributors Fleischhauer, Carl
Smock, William
Stewart, Fred
Winslow, Mel
Dates 1979
Language English
Subjects Activities
Bradshaw Cabin
Buckarooing
Cattle Movement
Ethnography
Line Camps
Motion Pictures
Ninety Six Ranch
Trail Drive (1979)
Title
A Buckaroo Conversation after a Morning's Work
Contributor Names
Fleischhauer, Carl (Interviewer)
Smock, William (Interviewer)
Stewart, Fred (Narrator)
Winslow, Mel (Narrator)
Created / Published
October 4, 1979
Subject Headings
-  Ninety-Six Ranch
-  Activities
-  Line camps
-  Bradshaw Cabin
-  Trail Drive (1979)
-  Cattle movement
-  Buckarooing
-  Ethnography
-  Motion Pictures
Genre
Ethnography
Motion Pictures
Notes
-  In the Bradshaw Cabin, cowboys talk about of the difficulties of chasing cattle out of dense mountain thickets when rounding them up.
-  This conversation between Fred Stewart and Mel Winslow on the subject of rounding up cattle was filmed in the Bradshaw cabin just after lunch on the final day of gathering. Clay Taylor was also in the cabin, sitting opposite Fred and Mel; he is seen in a cutaway shot near the end of the film. In the final shot, Tex Northrup arrives, heralded by Mel saying, "Here comes the foreman."
-  The exchange portrays the camaraderie between the cowboys and suggests the difficulties connected with pushing cattle out of the dense mountain thickets. Note the word used by Tex Northrup when he joins the conversation, saying, "You've really been buckarooing." The film ends as Mel tallies each man's catch, calculating a total of fifty four animals.
Medium
16mm film
Call Number
AFC 1991/021: NV9-VT3
Source Collection
Paradise Valley Folklife Project Collection (AFC 1991/021)
Repository
American Folklife Center
Digital Id
http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.afc/afc96ran.v007


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Credit line

Paradise Valley Folklife Project collection, 1978-1982 (AFC 1991/021), American Folklife Center, Library of Congress

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