The Library of Congress > National Jukebox > Artists > Morton Harvey

Morton Harvey

Morton Harvey (1886–1961) was, according to Victor advertising, a tenor. But in reality he had a baritone voice range that he exhibited on many recordings—not only for Victor, but also for Edison, Columbia, and Emerson. On October 2, 1914 he recorded, for Victor, what appears to be the first vocal blues on record, W. C. Handy's "Memphis Blues." Harvey had a successful career in vaudeville before turning to radio station management and photography later in life

The following recordings featuring Morton Harvey are available in the National Jukebox:

Results: 1-8 of 8
  Artist Role Title Description Primary Performer(s) Date
Vocalist - Tenor vocal At the ball, that's all Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1914-10-02
Vocalist - Tenor vocal I want to go back to Michigan Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1914-10-02
Vocalist - Tenor vocal The Memphis blues Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1914-10-02
Vocalist - Tenor vocal The melody of my dream Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1916-09-18
Vocalist - Tenor vocal I'm going over the hills to Virginia Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1916-09-18
Vocalist - Tenor vocal If you don't want me, send me to my ma Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1916-07-05
Vocalist - Tenor vocal Morning, noon and night Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1916-07-05
Vocalist - Tenor vocal From me to Mandy Lee Male vocal solo, with orchestra Morton Harvey 1917-06-21