The Library of Congress > Cyber LC > Margaret Mead

title image for Margaret Mead Symposium

THE SYMPOSIUM

DAY TWO -- Tuesday, December 4, 2001

IMPLICATIONS OF HISTORY AND CULTURE FOR DIPLOMACY, NATIONAL SECURITY, AND PEACE-MAKING. (View the entire Panel)

"Simple peoples and civilized peoples, mild peoples and violent peoples, will all go to war if they have the invention, just as those people who have the custom of dueling will have duels...Warfare...is just an invention, older and more widespread that the jury system, but none the less an invention." --Margaret Mead, "Warfare is Only an Invention --Not a Biological Necessity," Asia, 1940

Chaired by

Tim White, journalist, executive television and film producer

  • Nicholas Eberstadt, American Enterprise Institute, strategic demographer and political economist
  • Jerrold M. Post, Psychiatrist Founder and Director, Center for Analysis of Personality and Political Behavior, CIA; political psychologist, George Washington University; specialist in political violence and terrorism
  • Judith Kipper, Director, Middle East Forum, Council on Foreign Relations; Co-Director, Middle East Studies Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies, consultant, ABC News
    Discussion (10 minutes)
Return to top

HOW DO THE MEDIA, POPULAR CULTURE, AND LITERATURE REFLECT NATIONAL CHARACTER, STEREOTYPES, AND PERCEPTIONS? (View the entire Panel)

"The Chinese tendency to think in terms of analogy to the family system applies also to their way of thinking about international relations...Family imagery is confined to children's books, similar thinking appears in newspaper references...and film." -- John Hast Weaklund, "Chinese Family Images in International Relations," and "An Analysis of Seven Cantonese Films" in Margaret Mead and Rhoda Metraux, ed., The Study of Culture at a Distance (New York and Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2000)

Chaired by

Tim White, journalist, executive television and film producer
  • Stephen Hess, Political Scientist, The Brookings Institution, author, International News & Foreign Correspondents
  • Edgardo C. Krebs, Anthropologist, Research Associate, Smithsonian Institution, occasional contributor to La Nacion, Buenos Aires, and Times Literary Supplement
  • Mary-Jane Deeb, Arab World Area Specialist, African and Middle Eastern Division, Library of Congress
  • Barbara Mossberg, President Emeritus, Goddard College, Senior Consultant, American Council on Education, Center for Institutional and International Initiatives
    Discussion (10 minutes)
Return to top

IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATING A GLOBAL COMMUNITY: KEEPING CITIZENS CURIOUS ABOUT THE WORLD. (View the entire Panel)

"The American encounter with the world...has been marked by profound ambivalence. More than any great nation in modern history, the United States has been uninterested in foreign affairs. Its parochialism and isolationism are matters of fact and historical record...Yet...the great events of the century are marked by Washington's involvement, for better or worse." -- James F. Hoge, Jr. and Fareed Zakaria in The American Encounter: The United States and the Making of the Modern World: Essays from 75 years of AForeign Affairs (New York: Basic Books, 1997)

Chaired by

Gail Leftwich, President, Federation of State Humanities Councils


WHITHER THE U.S. IN THE WORLD? (View the entire Panel)

"The control of foreign relations by modern democracies creates a new and pressing demand for popular education in international affairs...they demand to know what is going on and have an opportunity to express their opinions at all stages of diplomatic proceedings." --Elihu Root, September 1922, quoted in James Hoge, Jr., and Fareed Zakaria, ed. The American Encounter

Chaired by

Prosser Gifford, Director, Office of Scholarly Programs, Library of Congress

  • William Watts, President, Potomac Associates, former Senior Staff Member, National Security Council under Henry Kissinger
    Discussion (10 minutes)
Return to top | Return Home



Return to the CyberLC Page


Library of Congress icon Library of Congress
Library of Congress Help Desk (04/09/02)