• Dog Tags: History, Stories & Folklore of Military Identification

    The 100th anniversary of the official use of American personal identity tags, affectionately known as "dog tags," recently passed without fanfare. Dog tags are highly personal items to warriors of every service and to their families as well. Each dog tag carries its own human-interest story. The acts of receiving the dog tag, hanging it around the neck, and feeling it against the body ...

    • Contributor: Cucolo, Ginger
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2012-01-26
  • Revolutionaries, Nursery Rhymes, and Edison Wax Cylinders: The Remarkable Tale of the Earliest Korean Sound Recordings

    On July 24, 1896, the pioneering ethnologist Alice Fletcher recorded six wax cylinders documenting the singing of three Koreans who were studying in Washington, D.C. Now housed in the American Folklife Center Archive, these cylinders have proved to be the earliest known recordings of Korean music. As interesting as the recordings themselves, are the extraordinary circumstances surrounding how they came to be made, as ...

    • Contributor: Provine, Robert
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2009-01-27
  • Coffeehouses: Folk Music, Culture & Counterculture

    Since the 1950s, the history of the American folk music revival has been intertwined with the rise of coffeehouses and coffeehouse culture. This forum brings together notable coffeehouse producer Betsy Siggins from Boston's legendary Club 47, Caffe Lena History Project Founder and Producer Jocelyn Arem, filmmaker and documentarian Todd Kwait, and Baltimore-based performer and "open mic" organizer Rob Hinkal to explore folk music coffeehouses, ...

    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2014-04-11
  • Archie Green Memorial: Remembering Archie

    The American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress hosted a two-day event including a tribute, a symposium, and a concert, honoring folklorists Archie Green and Joe Wilson, and celebrating the acquisition of the National Council for the Traditional Arts (NCTA) Collection by the Center's archive. The multifaceted event featured spoken tributes, musical performances, panel discussions, and rare glimpses at archival treasures, and was ...

    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2009-09-10
  • Laborlore: Collecting and Contextualizing Laborlore

    Through a case study approach, the panelists focus on a range of issues confronting documentary fieldworkers and their community collaborators in the arena of documenting and representing occupational lore and traditions. Focusing on maritime traditions and ranching culture, participants address the issues of how to frame labor culture and traditions for a broader public in the realm of the museum, the internet and live ...

    • Contributor: Various
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2007-08-16
  • Woodie Guthrie: My Father, My Partner

    Nora Guthrie recounted her early recollections of family life (which include family gatherings and hootenannies with musicians close to the family), her father Woody's hospitalization with Huntington's Disease, her recognition of her father's growing mythology among artists in the 1960s folk music revival, and the gradual transition of her relationship with her father into one of professional partnership.

    • Contributor: Guthrie, Nora
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2012-03-29
  • Laborlore: Expressive Culture, Work Culture and the Art of Representation

    This panel considers the artistic representations of work in a range of cultural and social contexts (Mexico, Texas, Nevada, San Francisco) and in a variety of media (graphic arts, video and material culture). The panel focuses on issues of self-representation, the aesthetics of portraying work culture for both inside and outside audiences and the ways in which members of working communities adapt old and ...

    • Contributor: Various
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2007-08-16
  • I Feel So Good: The Life & Times of Big Bill Broonzy

    A major figure in American blues and folk music, Big Bill Broonzy (1903-1958) left his Arkansas Delta home after World War I, headed north, and became the leading Chicago bluesman of the 1930s. His success came as he fused traditional rural blues with the electrified sound that was beginning to emerge in Chicago. This, however, was just one step in his remarkable journey: Big ...

    • Contributor: Riesman, Bob
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2012-11-16
  • Reverb

    Gospel/inspirational harmony group Reverb performs as part of the Library's celebration of African American History Month. The concert was also part of the Homegrown Concert Series sponsored by the American Folklife Center.

    • Contributor: Reverb Ensemble
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2007-02-07
  • Passing for Traditional: The New Lost City Ramblers and Folk Music Authenticity

    The New Lost City Ramblers were pioneers in the old-time music revival that paralleled the great folk music boom of the 1960s. Mike Seeger, John Cohen, and Tom Paley (later replaced by Tracy Schwarz) were city-born and suburban-bred folk musicians who specialized in recreating the sounds of rural southern stringband and early bluegrass music at a time when the folk music scene was dominated ...

    • Contributor: Allen, Ray
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2011-09-08
  • Gary Haleamau: Traditional Hawaiian Music from Las Vegas

    Gary Haleamau and his band perform traditional Hawaiian slack-key guitar from Nevada, another in the Homegrown Concert Series sponsored by the American Folklife Center.

    • Contributor: Haleamau, Gary
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-08-20
  • Place and the Politics of Belonging

    One of America's greatest ironies is that, although a nation of immigrants, the country also has a longstanding history of ambivalence, and at times hostility, toward its newest arrivals. In the last decade, the increased number of immigrants living in new destinations, those settlements located outside the U.S.-Mexico borderlands, has coincided with an upsurge in local anti-immigrant sentiment.

    • Contributor: Shutika, Debra Lattanzi - Lattanzi Shutika, Debra
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2010-08-12
  • Seeing Mary: Belief, Politics, and Practice at Marian Apparition Sites

    What happens in a community after a Catholic claims to see and hear Mary, the Blessed Mother? Always a challenging situation, the claims are contested while individuals try to discern the credibility of the visionary and the apparition. Those who choose to believe develop devotional practices to honor Mary at the site made sacred through her visit. These devotions are both ancient and emergent, ...

    • Contributor: Pryor, Anne
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-06-03
  • New Deal Resources: Preserving the Legacy, Part 2

    The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just ...

    • Contributor: Various
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-03-13
  • Celebrating the Acquisition of the NCTA Collection

    Barry Bergey with the National Endowment for the Arts moderates a group of panelists who discuss the significance and highlights of the NCTA Collection.

    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2009-09-11
  • Force and Violins: What the FBI Had on Folksingers

    Among the sufferings of those pursued during the McCarthy era, the situation of folksingers and folklorists was unique. Suspected by their government, they were hunted by the FBI almost everywhere. Thanks to the Freedom of Information Act, one can now know the extent of privacy crimes committed against Pete Seeger and other folklorists. For more than 20 years, the FBI and CIA conducted surveillance ...

    • Contributor: Dunaway, David
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-03-19
  • The Will to Adorn: Reflections on African American Identity and the Aesthetics of Dress

    Diana N'Diaye shares stories, observations, and insights from "The Will to Adorn," a community-centered research and public presentation project, which explores and examines the diversity of African American cultural identities as expressed through traditional arts of the body, dress, and adornment.

    • Contributor: N'Diaye, Diana - N'Diaye, Diana Baird
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2013-01-30
  • Legends and Legacies Concert: A Celebration of Public Folklore

    A Legends and Legacies concert celebrates Joseph T. Wilson and the NCTA Collection coordinated and produced by the National Council for the Traditional Arts (NCTA).

    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2009-09-10
  • Do All Indians Live in Tipis? and Other Compelling Questions for Education

    Stereotypes, inaccuracies and inappropriate representations of Native Americans continue to abound in American society today. Reflecting on his 20 years of experience working in the field of American Indian education, the Edwin Schupman explores examples, causes and implications of the current state of awareness about Native peoples and issues.

    • Contributor: Schupman, Edwin
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-08-05
  • New Deal Resources: Preserving the Legacy, Part 1

    The "New Deal" Franklin Delano Roosevelt had promised the American people began to take shape immediately after his inauguration on March 4, 1933. The multi-faceted social, cultural and fiscal recovery program aimed to reform and reinvigorate national life, and to end the Great Depression. Many New Deal administrators believed that art could be a part of the daily lives of all Americans, not just ...

    • Contributor: Various
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2008-03-13
  • Afghan Women's Stories: the Problematics of Cover

    Afghan women in burkas have become iconic representations of women's oppression in western media, but this representation is contested in various ways by Afghan women and men. The most common observation by Afghan women activists is that we westerners should get over it, that the burka, hot, uncomfortable and inconvenient as it is, is certainly not their most pressing problem. It has even proved ...

    • Contributor: Mills, Margaret
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2007-09-19
  • Traditional Greek Smyrneika Music from Massachusetts

    Sophia Bilides sings and plays santouri (Greek hammered dulcimer) and zilia (finger cymbals). Smyrneika songs arose out an urban population where the music of Greeks, Turks, Jews, and Armenians influenced each other in the early decades of the 20th century. This vibrant cultural scene was shattered when conflicts led to the 1922 Asia-Minor Catastrophe. The destruction of the port city of Smyrna (Izmir) led ...

    • Contributor: Bilides, Sophia
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2011-08-24
  • Reflections on Memory & History: Collecting New Oral Histories of the Civil Rights Movement

    A half-century on, what remains to be learned of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement? Plenty, it turns out. Last year historian Joe Mosnier, together with videographer John Bishop, journeyed to twenty states to interview fifty individuals who, most as teenagers or young adults, gave themselves over to the civil rights struggle. This testimony -- urgent and immediate, but also refracted by memory and time ...

    • Contributor: Mosnier, Joe - Mosnier, Joseph
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2012-04-12
  • Making a Way Out of No Way: Martin Luther King's Use of Proverbs for Civil Rights

    For more than ten years Wolfgang Mieder has made the study of proverbs in political discourse one of his major research areas, particularly the role of proverbs at critical moments in American history. In this lecture he discusses his research for his most recent book, "Making a Way Out of No Way: Martin Luther King's Sermonic Proverbial Rhetoric" (2010). In barely 40 years of ...

    • Contributor: Mieder , Wolfgang - Mieder, Wolfgang
    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2011-02-10
  • Celebrating the Acquisition of the NCTA Collection

    Barry Bergey, with the National Endowment for the Arts moderates a group of panelists who discuss the significance and highlights of the NCTA Collection.

    • Original Format: Film, Video - Manuscripts/Mixed Material - Collection
    • Date: 2009-09-11