Braille Book Review--Nov.-Dec. 1996

Books for Children--Fiction

Books listed in this issue of Braille Book Review were recently sent to cooperating libraries. The complete collection contains books by many authors on fiction and nonfiction subjects, including animals, geography, nature, mystery, sports, and others. Contact your cooperating library to learn more about the wide range of books available in the collection.

To order books, contact your cooperating library.

Dear Bear BR 9942
by Joanna Harrison
1 volume
While Katie is busy during the day, she doesn't think about the bear. But at night she worries that the bear will jump out of the closet under the stairs and grab her. Her mother tells her to write a letter to the bear asking it to go away. Then the bear writes back! PRINT/BRAILLE. For preschool-grade 2. 1994.

Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? BR 9944
by Bill Jr. Martin
1 volume
A brown bear sees a red bird. What does the red bird see? Each animal sees another colorful animal until a goldfish sees a teacher, the teacher sees her class, and the class sees each one of the animals again. PRINT/BRAILLE. For preschool-grade 2. 1967.

"Hi, Pizza Man!" BR 9946
by Virginia Walter
1 volume
Vivian is very hungry and is having a hard time waiting for the pizza man. While waiting, she and her mother play a game about who might deliver the pizza. PRINT/BRAILLE. For preschool-grade 2. 1995.

Arthur Meets the President BR 9947
by Marc Brown
1 volume
Arthur and his classmates enter a nationwide essay contest on "How I Can Help Make America Great." When Arthur's essay wins, all of his friends and family are thrilled: they get to go to Washington, D.C.! But Arthur is too nervous to be happy because he has to give his speech to the president! PRINT/BRAILLE. For grades K-3. 1991.

Once upon a Golden Apple BR 9950
by Jean Little and Maggie de Vries
1 volume
"Once upon a time" is how most fairy tales begin, but not this one. And much to the amusement of the three bears, the seven dwarfs, and even the gingerbread boy, that isn't the end of it. PRINT/BRAILLE. For grades 2-4. 1991.

Turnip Soup BR 10003
by Lynne Born and Christopher Myers
1 volume
One afternoon George's mother sends him down to the root cellar to get some potatoes so she can make potato soup for dinner. But when George comes back and tells her there is a dragon in the cellar eating all the vegetables, she thinks George just wants something different for dinner. Then his mother makes an interesting discovery. PRINT/BRAILLE. For preschool-grade 2. 1994.

Night Becomes Day BR 10007
by Richard McGuire
1 volume
The passage of time is depicted by a string of word associations, such as "cloud becomes rain" and "dream becomes good." Artwork shows how "wool becomes blanket" and "tree becomes paper." PRINT/BRAILLE. For preschool-grade 2 and older readers. 1994.

Rites of Passage: Stories about Growing Up by Black Writers from around the World BR 10120
edited by Tonya Bolden
2 volumes
Stories about young black people who are growing up in different parts of the world. In "Dreaming the Sky Down," a plump, awkward British girl faces her gym teacher's taunts by day, while at night she flies gracefully in her dreams. But is she really dreaming? Barbados, the United States, Jamaica, and South Africa are the settings for other stories. Some strong language. For grades 5-8. 1994.

The Wimp of the World BR 10302
by Alison Cragin Herzig and Jane Lawrence Mali
1 volume
Ten-year-old Bridget lives with her family at the Blue Moon Motel, which they own. When Bridget's triplet brothers devise a training program to make her less wimpy and Bridget learns she is to room with the new baby, she turns to her great-aunt Dawsie for help. But Dawsie announces she's getting married and wants Bridget to wear a frilly dress--something her brothers definitely won't approve of! For grades 3-6. 1994.

The Abominable Snowman of Pasadena: Goosebumps BR 10303
by R.L. Stine
1 volume
At twelve, Jordan has never seen snow and cannot even imagine what it is like, especially while living in sweltering Pasadena, California. When his father gets a photographic assignment in Alaska, Jordan and his sister, Nicole, are excited that they get to go too. Little do they know what is in store for them as they track the elusive and mysterious snow monster, the Abominable Snowman. For grades 4-7. 1995.

Don't Open the Door after the Sun Goes Down: Tales of the Real and Unreal BR 10306
by Al Carusone
1 volume
In the title story, Jarrel is hiking with his two cruel older brothers when a storm approaches. They come to an odd house and ask the old man living there if they can stay the night. He agrees but warns them not to answer the door after dark. In "Dog Days," a girl gets a strange replacement pet when a woman runs over her dog. Seven other spooky tales complete the collection. For grades 3-6. 1994.

The Topiary Garden BR 10308
by Janni Howker
1 volume
Liz Jackson, twelve, is spending the weekend with her father and older brother, Alan, at a motorcycle competition near Carlton Hall. Running away from her dad and Alan after they laugh at her for getting upset about a picture Alan drew in her sketchbook, Liz meets Sally Beck, ninety-one, who has an extraordinary tale to tell about her life at Carlton Hall. For grades 6-9. 1984.

The Bus People BR 10318
by Rachel Anderson
1 volume
Bertram wouldn't swap places with any of the other school bus drivers even though they call his route the "fruitcake run." First we meet a girl who has Down's syndrome as she learns a heartbreaking lesson at her sister's wedding. Then there are more portraits of Bertram's special passengers: a child who uses a wheelchair, another who doesn't speak, and a boy who falls off his big sister's bike and damages his brain. For grades 5-8. 1989.

Sable BR 10320
by Karen Hesse
1 volume
Although ten-year-old Tate longs for a dog, her mother, who was attacked by a dog as a girl, refuses. When a weak, skinny stray wanders into their yard, Tate is surprised that her mother grudgingly puts up with the dog Tate has named Sable. Then Sable develops a habit of going off exploring and bringing back other people's belongings. Now Tate's mother wants to give Sable away. For grades 3-5. 1994.

Chin Yu Min and the Ginger Cat BR 10340
by Jennifer Armstrong
1 volume
The haughty wife of a rich official refuses help from her neighbors after her husband dies. But as she grows poorer and poorer, she finds she will soon be out of food. Then she meets a ginger cat who can help her gain her wealth back. When he disappears, the woman learns a useful lesson. For grades 3-6. 1993.

Looking for Jamie Bridger BR 10354
by Nancy Springer
1 volume
At fourteen, Jamie wants to know who her real parents are. Her question brings an unexpected and horrified response from her grandparents, with whom she lives. Jamie sets out to find some answers and discovers that her grandparents have a son whom they never discuss because he is gay. As Grandma begins to withdraw, Jamie becomes more determined in her search. For grades 5-8. 1995.

Danger on Thunder Mountain: An American Adventure, Book 3 BR 10404
by Lee Roddy
2 volumes
Ruby Konning, Hildy's cousin, arrives in California to continue searching for her father. After she and Hildy rescue a sheepherder from a group of tormentors, they show him a picture of Ruby's father. The sheepherder says he has never seen the man, but both Ruby and Hildy notice the look in his eyes. Sequel to The Desperate Search (BR 10403). For grades 4-7. 1989.

Hold Fast to Dreams BR 10413
by Andrea Davis Pinkney
1 volume
Dee Willis, twelve, is not happy about moving from Baltimore to Wexford, Connecticut. Just as her friend Lorelle warned her, Dee is the only black student in her class. Her sister, Lindsay, fits in at her prep school by acting white and joining the lacrosse team. But Dee misses her double-dutch squad and isn't good at playing lacrosse. Will her hobby of photography and her one friend be enough to make school bearable? For grades 5-8. 1995.


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(Last Update: November 12, 1996)