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NLS: That All May Read

Adult Nonfiction

Adventure

Forever on the Mountain: The Truth behind One of Mountaineering’s Most Controversial and Mysterious Disasters     DB/RC 67223
16 hours 28 minutes
by James M. Tabor
read by Patrick Downer
The author uses diaries, letters, personal interviews with survivors, and government documents to investigate the disappearance of seven men in July 1967 when a storm hit as they attempted to scale Alaska’s Mt. McKinley. Discusses allegations of incompetence and a cover-up. 2007.

Stanley: The Impossible Life of Africa’s Greatest Explorer     DB/RC 66847
23 hours 42 minutes
by Tim Jeal
read by Roy Avers
The biographer of Livingstone (RC 7906) reappraises the character and reputation of adventure traveler Henry Morton Stanley, based on access to previously sealed Stanley family archives. Provides details about Stanley’s expeditions across Africa and examines misperceptions about his public career and intimate life. National Book Critics Circle Award. 2007.

Ten Degrees of Reckoning: The True Story of a Family’s Love and the Will to Survive     DB 68440
7 hours 51 minutes
by Hester Rumberg
read by Margaret Strom
Rumberg describes the 1993 ordeal of her friends the Sleavin family, whose around-the-world voyage ended violently when a ship rammed their small sailing boat. Details Judith Sleavin’s rescue after her husband and two young children died, and recounts the beginning of her healing process. 2009.

Wreck of the Carl D.: A True Story of Loss, Survival, and Rescue at Sea     DB 68493
8 hours 28 minutes
by Michael Schumacher
read by Ted Stoddard
Recounts the November 1958 sinking of 638-foot limestone carrier Carl D. Bradley during a storm on Lake Michigan. Describes the tragedy that claimed thirty-three lives, the plight of survivors aboard a small raft, the search-and-rescue mission, and the impact on the small town of Rogers City, Michigan—the home of most crew members. 2008.

Animals and Wildlife

Alex and Me: How a Scientist and a Parrot Discovered a Hidden World of Animal Intelligence—and Formed a Deep Bond in the Process     DB/RC 68344
5 hours 19 minutes
by Irene M. Pepperberg
read by Annie Wauters
Researcher describes her thirty-year relationship with the African Grey parrot Alex and relates the personality of and emotional connections made by the bird who told her “You be good. I love you” each night. Expands on observations of Alex’s groundbreaking cognitive achievements detailed in The Alex Studies (RC 51983). 2008.

Dewey: The Small-Town Library Cat Who Touched the World     DB/RC 67516
8 hours 31 minutes
by Vicki Myron
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Spencer, Iowa, public library director Vicki Myron describes finding a kitten in the book drop in 1988. Named Dewey Readmore Books by library staff, the feline became an increasingly famous mascot over the next nineteen years. Myron also discusses her divorce, single parenthood, breast cancer scare, and love of librarianship. Bestseller. 2008.

The Dog Bible: Everything Your Dog Wants You to Know     DB/RC 68198
38 hours 34 minutes
by Tracie Hotchner
read by Kerry Dukin
Comprehensive approach to raising and training canines. Covers selecting a dog, providing proper nutrition, grooming, encouraging socialization, crating, and dealing with travel issues. Discusses emergency care. Explains dog psychology, genetic tendencies, and natural instincts including wolf-pack and alpha-leader behaviors. Describes warning signs of aggression. 2005.

Dog-Friendly Gardens, Garden-Friendly Dogs     DB/RC 66349
6 hours 36 minutes
by Cheryl S. Smith
read by Kerry Dukin
Tips on harmoniously keeping both a garden and a dog. Provides recommendations for bed design and vegetation, including groundcovers and grass, and warns against harmful plants and products. Covers mulches, composts, vegetables, paths, fencing, and some aspects of dog play. Discusses designating pet-digging areas. 2004.

Dogs: A Natural History     DB/RC 66357
6 hours 32 minutes
by Jake Page
read by Andy Pyle
Author of In the Hands of the Great Spirit: The 20,000-Year History of American Indians (RC 56097) traces sixty million years of canine evolution. Discusses wild relatives such as wolves and the process of domestication. Describes dog behavior, communication, and intelligence and ponders the relationship between dogs and humans. 2007.

The Emotional Lives of Animals: A Leading Scientist Explores Animal Joy, Sorrow, and Empathy—and Why They Matter     DB/RC 67376
7 hours 9 minutes
by Marc Bekoff
read by Bob Moore
Award-winning biologist uses evidence from neurological and behavioral studies to argue that animals have feelings. Provides accounts of fun-loving mice, pleasure-seeking iguanas, angry baboons, and other creatures to demonstrate how emotions drive social interaction. Urges a reassessment of animal treatment in zoos, laboratories, and farms. Foreword by Jane Goodall. 2007.

The Gift of Jazzy     DB/RC 67835
6 hours 10 minutes
by Cindy Adams
read by Carol Dines
New York Post columnist Cindy Adams recalls the loneliness she felt after the death of her husband, comedian Joey Adams, in 1999—until a friend sent her a Yorkshire terrier. Adams recounts her first year with Jazzy and describes the ways the puppy helped her love and laugh again. 2003.

Golden Bats and Pink Pigeons     DB/RC 65884
4 hours 52 minutes
by Gerald Durrell
read by Gary Tipton
Durrell, a naturalist and zookeeper, recounts voyages to the islands of Mauritius and Rodrigues in the Indian Ocean east of Madagascar, once home to the now-extinct Dodo bird. Describes the efforts of his team to collect endangered species and bring them to his Jersey sanctuary to ensure their survival. 1977.

The Good Food Cookbook for Dogs: Fifty Home-Cooked Recipes for the Health and Happiness of Your Canine Companion     DB/RC 65785
2 hours 19 minutes
by Donna Twichell Roberts
read by Jill Fox
Wholesome human recipes adapted for dogs. Includes suggestions for stews, casseroles, treats, gravies and sauces, ethnic specialties, party and holiday food, and dishes for dogs with special needs such as kidney and heart disease or allergies. Provides basic nutrition information, feeding guidelines, and time-saving tips on food storage. 2004.

Izzy and Lenore: Two Dogs, an Unexpected Journey, and Me     DB/RC 68441
5 hours 23 minutes
by Jon Katz
read by Mark Ashby
Author recounts the addition of Izzy, an emotionally damaged border collie, and Lenore, a spirited black lab puppy, to his upstate New York farm. Describes Izzy’s acute sensitivity, which inspired Katz to do hospice volunteering, and Lenore’s affection, which helped Katz cope with his own painful past. 2008.

The Snake Charmer: A Life and Death in Pursuit of Knowledge     DB/RC 68151
8 hours 28 minutes
by Jamie James
read by Steven Carpenter
Details the life and career of American herpetologist Joe Slowinski. Describes the thirty-eight-year-old expedition leader being bitten by a deadly many-banded krait in a remote part of Myanmar on September 11, 2001, and the hours his colleagues spent trying to keep him alive. Some strong language. 2008.

Tell Me Where It Hurts: A Day of Humor, Healing, and Hope in My Life as an Animal Surgeon     DB/RC 66505
10 hours 32 minutes
by Nick Trout
read by Joe Peck
Boston veterinary surgeon Trout describes his typical work day, recounting anecdotes about his patients and their owners. Discusses interpreting animal behavior and symptoms to determine a diagnosis, the impact of technology on his practice, human-pet bonds, and the emotional effects of euthanizing companion animals on all involved. 2008.

Wesley the Owl: The Remarkable Love Story of an Owl and His Girl     DB/RC 68258
6 hours 26 minutes
by Stacy O’Brien
read by Kristin Allison
The author, an assistant in the Caltech owl department in 1985, recounts adopting Wesley, a four-day-old barn owl with a nerve-damaged wing. She portrays the strong bond they developed over nineteen years, manifested by the owl’s efforts to feed her mice, build her nests, and make her his mate. 2008.

Zamba: The True Story of the Greatest Lion That Ever Lived     DB/RC 67900
9 hours 5 minutes
by Ralph Helfer
read by Alec Volz
Hollywood animal behaviorist fondly recalls his eighteen-year relationship with Zamba, an African lion that came to live on his California ranch in the mid-1950s. Helfer recounts adventures with Zamba, including movie productions, and he describes his development of affection training, which uses methods based on love instead of fear. 2005.

The Arts

Leonardo da Vinci: Flights of the Mind     RC 65119
25 hours 35 minutes
by Charles Nicholl
read by Alexander Strain
Biography of Renaissance artist, philosopher, and scientist Leonardo da Vinci (1452–1519). Author examines Leonardo’s notebooks and contemporary manuscripts to search for the man behind the myth. Progresses chronologically through Leonardo’s life and career and portrays his complexity and variety of interests. 2004.

A Life of Picasso: Volume 3, 1917–1932; the Triumphant Years     DB/RC 66274
25 hours 40 minutes
by John Richardson
read by Frank Coffee
Covers Picasso’s diverse artistic enterprises before age fifty, from his adventures with Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes and marriage to ballerina Olga Khokhlova to his welded sculptures and Surrealism. Describes Picasso’s interactions with other artists and affair with young Marie-Thérèse. Sequel to A Life of Picasso: Volume 2, 1907–1917 (RC 44599). 2007.

A Pocketful of History: Four Hundred Years of America—One State Quarter at a Time     DB/RC 67327
10 hours 30 minutes
by Jim Noles
read by Butch Hoover
Essays examine the design choices and related history behind each of the coins comprising the Fifty State Quarters Program. Describes the varied subject matter, ranging from the arts to nature and including many state mottoes. Provides specifics of the commemorative program begun in 1999. 2008.

Astronomy

Apollo Moon Missions: The Unsung Heroes     DB/RC 68235
7 hours 38 minutes
by Billy Watkins
read by Jake Williams
Interviews conducted between 1999 and 2005 with fourteen behind-the-scenes contributors. Features the NASA photography chief who instructed astronauts on picture taking, the chief technician for space-suit maintenance, the wife of an Apollo 14 astronaut, and the project director who developed a lunar roving vehicle on a truncated timeline. 2007.

The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics     DB/RC 67836
13 hours 17 minutes
by Leonard Susskind
read by Lou Harpenau
Examines both Stephen Hawking’s 1976 assertion that particles of matter falling into a black hole are permanently lost to the universe and the ensuing scientific debates. Discusses attacks on Hawking’s theory, beginning in 1983, by fellow physicists Gerard ’t Hooft and author Susskind—and Hawking’s 2004 reversal. 2008.

Lives of the Planets: A Natural History of the Solar System     DB/RC 66469
10 hours 7 minutes
by Richard Corfield
read by Jake Williams
A survey of the solar system from the Sun to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. Chronicles the technological developments, space missions, and discoveries—particularly in the last half of the twentieth century—that deepened human understanding of each planet’s unique surface chemistry, atmospheric conditions, and 4.5-billion-year natural history. 2007.

Biography

Alice: Princess Andrew of Greece     RC 64788
17 hours 16 minutes
by HugoVickers
read by Corrie James
Biography of Princess Alice (1885–1969), a great-granddaughter of Queen Victoria and the mother of Prince Philip. Portrays Alice’s 1903 marriage into the Greek royal family and her experience of wars, revolutions, and life in exile. Describes how Alice, born deaf, took religious vows and established a sisterhood. 2000.

American Son: My Story     DB/RC 67784
7 hours 9 minutes
by Oscar De La Hoya
read by Mark Delgado
Boxing’s “golden boy” De La Hoya relates his professional experiences and his successes in the ring, where he won six world championships and an Olympic gold medal. He also recounts the triumphs and failings in his personal life. 2008.

Backcast: Fatherhood, Fly-Fishing, and a River Journey through the Heart of Alaska     DB/RC 67479
10 hours 35 minutes
by Lou Ureneck
read by Guy Williams
A divorced father describes taking his eighteen-year-old son Adam fly-fishing on Alaska’s Kanektok River and having a wilderness experience together, including run-ins with bears. Ureneck reminisces about his own youth and career as a reporter while he relates trying to reconnect with Adam. Some strong language. 2007.

Brother, I’m Dying     DB/RC 66074
7 hours 58 minutes
by Edwidge Danticat
read by Robin Miles
Author recalls her childhood in Haiti where she was raised by her uncle Joseph, a minister. Describes their volatile Port-au-Prince neighborhood and her uncle’s treatment at the hands of a pro-Aristide mob and U.S. Customs officials. Some violence and some strong language. National Book Award finalist. 2007.

Call Me Ted     DB/RC 68012
14 hours 29 minutes
by Ted Turner
read by Patrick Downer
Autobiography of entrepreneur who founded the Cable News Network (CNN). Turner describes inheriting the family billboard company after his father’s suicide and building an international media empire that includes Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. Discusses his multiple marriages, sports interests, and philanthropic endeavors. Includes testimonials from friends and rivals. Bestseller. 2008.

Called out of Darkness: A Spiritual Confession     DB/RC 68423
7 hours 5 minutes
by Anne Rice
read by Elisabeth Rodgers
Spiritual memoir by the author of Interview with the Vampire (RC 61222). Rice recounts her devout Catholic upbringing in New Orleans, her liberal education in college at Berkeley, and her subsequent struggle with religious doubt. Describes finally finding, after thirty-eight years of atheism, a renewed faith in God. 2008.

Cavalryman of the Lost Cause: Biography of J.E.B. Stuart     DB 68313
17 hours 29 minutes
by Jeffry D.  Wert
read by Robert Sams
The author of The Sword of Lincoln (RC 60605) pens a biography about Confederate general James Ewell Brown “J.E.B.” Stuart (1833–1864). Uses archives and first-person accounts to trace Stuart’s family history. Discusses Stuart’s education, pre-Civil War military service, battle tactics, comrades-in-arms, and controversial decision during the Battle of Gettysburg. 2008.

The Eighth Promise: An American Son’s Tribute to His Toisanese Mother    RC 67215
11 hours 6 minutes
by William Poy Lee
read by Michael Scherer
Memoir of Chinese American lawyer Lee and his mother Poy Jen, who traveled from southeast China to San Francisco in 1948 for an arranged marriage. Highlights Poy Jen’s eight wedding promises to her “clan sisters” and Lee’s struggle to fulfill the eighth one—to live with compassion toward all. 2007.

Einstein: His Life and Universe    RC 64501
29 hours 56 minutes
by Walter Isaacson
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Biography of Albert Einstein (1879–1955), who won the 1921 Nobel Prize for physics. Discusses Einstein’s private and public life, including his years in America, work that led to the development of the atomic bomb, commitment to Zionism and pacifism, familial relationships, and love of playing the violin. Bestseller. 2007.

Emily Post: Daughter of the Gilded Age, Mistress of American Manners     DB/RC 68850
22 hours 4 minutes
by Laura Claridge
read by Barbara Caruso
Biography of twentieth-century etiquette expert Emily Price Post (1872–1960). Details Post’s privileged upbringing, scandalous 1906 divorce, and decision to work as a fiction writer to support her family. Describes Post’s rise as a bestselling author after publishing her first book of manners in 1922 at age fifty. 2008.

Epilogue: A Memoir     DB/RC 68178
9 hours 22 minutes
by Anne Roiphe
read by Alice Rosengard
Writer Roiphe describes the period following the unexpected death of her husband of nearly forty years. Roiphe discusses resuming dating at almost seventy, with the help of her daughters, who placed a personal ad. Expressing doubts about finding another soul mate, she nevertheless reveals determination not to constantly grieve. 2008.

Falling through the Earth: A Memoir    RC 64365
10 hours 50 minutes
by Danielle Trussoni
read by Constance Crawford
Author recalls a childhood shaped by her father’s Vietnam War experiences. Describes his emotional distance and the dissolution of their family. Presents her father’s combat recollections alongside her own memories and the travelog of her journey to Vietnam. Strong language, some violence, and some descriptions of sex. 2006.

Golda     DB/RC 67548
14 hours 57 minutes
by Elinor Burkett
read by Kristin Allison
Biography of Golda Meir (1898–1978), one of the founders of the State of Israel. Describes her childhood in Russia, her family’s immigration to the United States, and her dedication to Zionism. Examines her term as prime minister, her presence on the world political stage, and her legacy. 2008.

The Hidden Life of Otto Frank    RC 64996
14 hours 49 minutes
by Carol Ann Lee
read by Laura Giannarelli
Portrait of Anne Frank’s father Otto (1889–1980), a German-born Jewish businessman, who alone among his family and friends survived the concentration camps they were deported to once their hidden annex above his Amsterdam office was discovered in 1944. Focuses on Frank’s decades-long association with his alleged betrayer Tonny Ahlers. 2002.

The House at Sugar Beach: In Search of a Lost African Childhood     DB/RC 67610
11 hours 12 minutes
by Helene Cooper
read by Robin Miles
Memoir by New York Times correspondent describes her privileged childhood in Liberia as a descendant of black American founders. Cooper relates her uprooting by a 1980 coup that forced the family to flee to the United States—and her return decades later. Some violence and some strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

John Wilkes: The Scandalous Father of Civil Liberty    RC 65147
22 hours 24 minutes
by Arthur H. Cash
read by Kerry Dukin
Biography of English journalist and politician John Wilkes (1727–1797). Chronicles Wilkes’s life and career as an outspoken advocate of religious tolerance, parliamentary reform, and civil liberties. Examines Wilkes’s reputation as a libertine, his expulsion from the House of Commons, and his influence on America’s founding fathers and the Constitution. 2006.

The Life of Samuel Johnson    RC 65169
65 hours 6 minutes
by James Boswell
read by Ted Stoddard
Classic biography of the eighteenth-century English man of letters, originally published in 1791. Based on detailed notes compiled by Boswell during their twenty-year friendship, the text for the most part comprises conversations and statements of Johnson’s strong opinions. 1791.

The Longest Trip Home: A Memoir     DB/RC 68018
11 hours 9 minutes
by John Grogan
read by Bob Moore
John Grogan, author of Marley and Me (RC 61561), describes growing up near Detroit as the youngest of four siblings. Recounts many experiences, from disappointing his devout Catholic parents by living with his girlfriend to witnessing his father’s 2004 death and his mother’s mental decline. Strong language. 2008.

The Lost Supreme: The Life of Dreamgirl Florence Ballard     DB/RC 67456
7 hours 4 minutes
by Peter Benjaminson
read by Mare Trevathan
Biography of Flo Ballard, based on taped interviews with Ballard herself. Describes her singing as a teenager with Diana Ross and Mary Wilson, the trio’s evolution into the Supremes, and Ballard’s later expulsion. Discusses her attempts to get royalties and her death in 1976 at age thirty-two. 2008.

The Lost World of James Smithson: Science, Revolution, and the Birth of the Smithsonian    RC 65096
15 hours 56 minutes
by Heather Ewing
read by Mary Kane
Biography of Englishman James Smithson (1765–1829), who bequeathed his fortune to the United States—a country he had never seen—to create an institution that would promote knowledge among men. Discusses Smithson’s illegitimate birth, education, and early recognition as a scientist within the social context and political events of his era. 2007.

Love in Black and White: A Memoir of Race, Religion, and Romance    RC 65473
12 hours 58 minutes
by William S. Cohen
read by Bob Moore
Former secretary of defense William Cohen, a Republican, reflects on some of the defining moments in his interracial marriage to television journalist Janet Langhart, a Democrat. Discusses their very different lives before their 1996 wedding and the shared interests and beliefs that make their marriage work. Some strong language. 2007.

Manic: A Memoir    RC 66113
6 hours 39 minutes
by Terri Cheney
read by Mary Kane
Former Beverly Hills lawyer Cheney describes her lifelong battle to come to terms with bipolar disorder. Discusses her mood swings, erratic behavior, suicidal feelings, and the bliss of hypomania. Covers electroshock therapy, medication adjustments, and a life lived in extremes. Some violence and some strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

Marie-Thérèse, Child of Terror: The Fate of Marie Antoinette’s Daughter     DB/RC 67018
19 hours 9 minutes
by Susan Nagel
read by Gabriella Cavallero
Biography of Marie-Thérèse (1778–1851), the daughter of France’s King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Describes her escape from the Temple prison at the age of seventeen, her childless marriage to a Bourbon cousin, and her exile after surviving threats of abduction and assassination. 2008.

Negro with a Hat: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey     DB/RC 67631
23 hours 0 minutes
by Colin Grant
read by Peter Jay Fernandez
The life and times of Jamaican-born Marcus Garvey (1887–1940), a world leader in black civil rights. Chronicles Garvey’s 1914 formation of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), creation of the Black Star steamship line, development of the Back-to-Africa movement, and rivalry with W.E.B. Du Bois. 2008.

The Prince of Frogtown     DB/RC 67383
9 hours 39 minutes
by Rick Bragg
read by Guy Williams
Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Bragg continues his autobiography, begun in All Over but the Shoutin’ (RC 46142) and Ava’s Man (RC 53019). Reveals that becoming a stepfather to a ten-year-old boy at the age of forty-six released memories and questions about his own detested, alcoholic father. Some strong language. 2008.

A Remarkable Mother     DB/RC 66727
4 hours 30 minutes
by Jimmy Carter
read by Frank Coffee
Former U.S. president Jimmy Carter pays homage to his mother, Bessie Lillian Gordy Carter (1898–1983). Describes “Miss Lilly’s” childhood in rural Georgia, training as a nurse during World War I, marriage, and 1968–1969 trip to India as a Peace Corps volunteer. Highlights her humanitarian ethic at home and abroad. 2008.

Rigged: The True Story of an Ivy League Kid Who Changed the World of Oil, from Wall Street to Dubai     DB/RC 68314
9 hours 58 minutes
by Ben Mezrich
read by Erik Synnestvedt
Biography of an Italian American from Brooklyn who graduated from Harvard Business School and worked at the Mercantile Exchange trading in oil in 2002. Describes his responsibilities establishing a similar oil-exchange market in Dubai. Strong language. 2007.

The Road of Lost Innocence     DB/RC 68408
5 hours 18 minutes
by Somaly Mam
read by Tanya Eby Sirois
Sold into sexual slavery as a child, Cambodian author describes her ordeals and eventual escape from a Phnom Penh brothel with the help of a French aid worker. Mam details her later activism and efforts to help other victims of Southeast Asia’s sex-trade industry. Violence, descriptions of sex, and some strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

Schulz and Peanuts: A Biography     DB/RC 67443
28 hours 2 minutes
by David Michaelis
read by John Polk
Biography of Charles Schulz, the creator of the comic strip Peanuts, which he drew from 1950 until his death in 2000. Describes his childhood, the realization of his long-held desire to be a cartoonist, his family life, his two marriages, and the autobiographical aspects of his characters. 2007.

Stick Figure: A Diary of My Former Self     DB/RC 68249
6 hours 21 minutes
by Lori Gottlieb
read by Mare Trevathan
Adult author revisits the diary she maintained in 1978 when she was an eleven-year-old girl hospitalized with anorexia. She records family arguments, body-image obsessions, dieting, worrying about inhaling calories from people’s breath, conversations with doctors, and being discharged. Some strong language. For junior and senior high readers. 2000.

Things I’ve Been Silent About: Memories     DB 68638
11 hours 33 minutes
by Azar Nafisi
read by Annie Wauters
Author of Reading Lolita in Tehran (RC 56459) resumes her autobiography, concentrating on coming of age during the turbulent 1950s and 1960s in Iran. Describes her mother, a member of Parliament; her father, a former mayor who was imprisoned under the Shah’s regime; and life after the Islamic Revolution. 2008.

Too Close to the Sun: The Audacious Life and Times of Denys Finch Hatton     DB/RC 66911
12 hours 49 minutes
by Sara Wheeler
read by Corrie James
Biography of the English big-game hunter and bush pilot who, after his accidental death in 1931, was immortalized by his lover Karen Blixen (a.k.a. Isak Dinesen) in her book Out of Africa (RC 23011) and also by Beryl Markham in her memoir West with the Night (RC 23744). 2006.

True Compass: A Memoir     DB/RC 69538
17 hours 49 minutes
by Edward M. Kennedy
read by Jack Fox
Autobiography of the Democratic senator from Massachusetts, Ted Kennedy (1932–2009). Reminisces about his family, childhood, education, marriages, and five decades in politics. Discusses the assassinations of his brothers John and Bobby, the 1969 car accident at Chappaquiddick, and his battle with terminal brain cancer. Bestseller. 2009.

Unbowed: A Memoir     DB/RC 67068
13 hours 44 minutes
by Wangari Muta Maathai
read by Lisette Lecat
Memoir of Nobel Peace Prize winner, environmentalist, and political activist. Maathai, raised in colonial Africa, describes her return to the newly independent Kenya in 1966 after studying abroad. Discusses her founding the Green Belt Movement and mobilizing women to reforest the land and become educated. Hurston/Wright Legacy Award. 2006.

Unpacking the Boxes: A Memoir of a Life in Poetry     DB/RC 68474
6 hours 38 minutes
by Donald Hall
read by Gregory Gorton
Former U.S. poet laureate Donald Hall (born 1928) recalls his successes and failures as a son, husband, father, and writer. Shares memories that were released when he unpacked boxes of snapshots and manuscripts saved by his mother. Author of White Apples and the Taste of Stone: Selected Poems, 1946–2006 (RC 64104). 2008.

When a Crocodile Eats the Sun: A Memoir of Africa    RC 66006
11 hours 53 minutes
by Peter Godwin
read by John Horton
The author, who wrote of his boyhood and civil war in the former Rhodesia in Mukiwa: A White Boy in Africa (RC 43466), describes his return to Zimbabwe while his father was dying and his homeland was collapsing. Also discusses discovering the secret of his father’s true identity. Some strong language. 2006.

William Cullen Bryant: Author of America     DB 68030
15 hours 48 minutes
by Gilbert H. Muller
read by Ted Stoddard
Biography of William Cullen Bryant (1794–1878) from his impoverished New England childhood to his prominence as one of America’s foremost poets. Chronicles Bryant’s 1825 arrival in Manhattan as a lawyer and his half century as the politically and socially influential editor of the New York Evening Post. 2008.

Blindness and Physical Handicaps

Against Medical Advice: A True Story     DB/RC 67710
6 hours 15 minutes
by James Patterson and Hal Friedman
read by Erik Sandvold
Describes Cory Friedman’s struggle from age five with a complex case of Tourette syndrome, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and anxiety. Details his worsening symptoms despite multiple medications. Chronicles Friedman’s decision to stop the drugs and turn to other therapies, including tic-reversal training, which brought him relief in his late teens. Bestseller. 2008.

Behind Our Eyes: Stories, Poems, and Essays by Writers with Disabilities    RC 65632
8 hours 44 minutes
edited by Marilyn Brandt Smith
read by Mimi Bederman
Twenty-seven contributors, many blind, express their experiences dealing with everyday situations and emotions. In “Her Day Versus My Day” a twenty-five-year-old suffers a stroke. In “Rebel with a Cane” a thirteen-year-old who is blind defies her overprotective parents and walks home from school alone. 2007.

Being Well When We’re Ill: Wholeness and Hope in Spite of Infirmity     DB/RC 66901
8 hours 43 minutes
by Marva J.  Dawn
read by Annie Wauters
Theologian with multiple disabilities offers advice on attaining emotional, intellectual, and spiritual wholeness despite physical infirmities. Suggests scripture to deal with the sorrows of loneliness, pain, worry, boredom, depression, and dying and provides practical ideas for persevering in the face of severe or chronic illness. 2008.

The Blind Need Not Apply: A History of Overcoming Prejudice in the Orientation and Mobility Profession    RC 65118
8 hours 6 minutes
by Ronald J. Ferguson
read by Bob Moore
Provides a historical context for the conflict between the professionals in the orientation and mobility (O and M) field and organizations of blind people. Examines the basic assumptions underpinning their different approaches to preparing O and M instructors. Considers ways these differences have shaped policies and practice. 2007.

Chicken Soup for the Soul: Children with Special Needs; Stories of Love and Understanding for Those Who Care for Children with Disabilities     DB/RC 68830
12 hours 43 minutes
by Jack Canfield
and others
read by Alice Rosengard
Comforting accounts of rearing children who have autism, juvenile diabetes, Down syndrome, or other mental and physical disabilities by parents, relatives, and caregivers. Contributors share their challenges, setbacks, and successes as they discuss such topics as adjustment, gratitude, milestones, community, sibling rivalry, early learning, breaking barriers, and fostering independence. 2007.

The Elephant in the Playroom: Ordinary Parents Write Intimately and Honestly about the Extraordinary Highs and Heartbreaking Lows of Raising Kids with Special Needs    RC 66756
6 hours 51 minutes
by Denise Brodey
read by Kristin Allison
Parents discuss their personal experiences in coping with the emotional, medical, and social challenges of raising a special-needs child or children. Cover such topics as deciding whether and when to medicate, finding a school, and dealing with inappropriate behavior in public and at home. 2007.

Independent Movement and Travel in Blind Children: A Promotion Model    RC 65079
9 hours 8 minutes
by Joseph Cutter
read by Butch Hoover
Advocates a team approach to creating a positive learning environment that fosters mobility and self-reliance in blind children. Discusses the philosophy of cane travel, including the appropriate time to begin teaching cane use and ways to encourage the development of cane travel skills for home, school, and community. 2007.

Joni: An Unforgettable Story    DB/RC 66076
6 hours 43 minutes
by Joni Eareckson Tada
read by Elisabeth Rodgers
Tada, paralyzed from the neck down by a diving accident in 1967, shares her struggle—what she calls an “incredible adventure”—to adjust to her disability. Describes overcoming, through faith in God, her physical and emotional challenges and even becoming a skillful artist by using her mouth to guide her pen. 1976.

Macular Degeneration: A Complete Guide for Patients and Their Families     DB/RC 67861
5 hours 1 minute
by Michael A. Samuel
read by Carol Dines
Retinal surgeon discusses the causes and diagnoses associated with the wet and dry forms of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Includes guidelines for treatment; suggests nutritional therapy, including sample meals; and presents tips for improving the quality of life while coping with AMD. 2008.

Macular Disease: Practical Strategies for Living with Vision Loss     DB/RC 66823
5 hours 27 minutes
by Peggy R. Wolfe
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Author offers ideas and strategies for living with declining vision and provides examples from her own experience. Suggests ways to organize one’s home and deal with financial and legal affairs. Encourages others to embrace technology to enjoy reading, writing, and using computers. Lists useful organizations and companies. 2008.

Nickie’s Nook: Sharing the Journey     DB/RC 68003
3 hours 50 minutes
by Nickie Coby
read by Kristin Allison
Selected writings from the online journal of blind college student and aspiring social worker Coby, who has Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. Discusses her guide dog Julio, her Christianity, and the differences between blindness and chronic illness. For senior high and older readers. 2007.

One Hundred One Accessible Vacations: Travel Ideas for Wheelers and Slow Walkers     DB/RC 67755
12 hours 45 minutes
by Candy B. Harrington
read by Faith Potts
Author of Barrier-Free Travel (RC 61293) provides a guide to U.S.  destinations for people with mobility problems. Details cities, national parks, historical attractions, and recreational opportunities under categories such as big city, the great outdoors, road trips, cruises, small towns, and family fun. Covers lodging. 2008.

Rachel in the World: A Memoir    RC 66609
9 hours 42 minutes
by Jane Bernstein
read by Carol Dines
Mother recounts raising her daughter Rachel, born with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH), a disease that causes blindness, mental retardation, and seizure disorder. Discusses Rachel’s challenges between ages five and twenty-one in pursuing independence and decries the inadequacy of government support. Sequel to Loving Rachel (RC 28065). Some strong language. 2007.

Reading Lips: And Other Ways to Overcome a Disability     DB/RC 67826
8 hours 31 minutes
edited by Diane Scharper
and Philip Scharper Jr.
read by Kerry Dukin
Diane Scharper, a member of the National Book Critics Circle, and ophthalmologist Philip Scharper Jr. present twenty-nine winners from the Helen Keller Foundation for Research and Education memoir competition. Contributors from all over the world describe, in prose and poetry, overcoming life-altering disabilities ranging from blindness to cancer. 2008.

Somewhere in Heaven: The Remarkable Love Story of Dana and Christopher Reeve     DB/RC 67577
6 hours 34 minutes
by Christopher Andersen
read by Annie Wauters
Portrait of actor Christopher Reeve (1952–2004) and his singer-actress wife Dana (1961–2006) and their deepening bond following a 1995 riding accident that caused Chris’s quadriplegia. Discusses their advocacy for spinal-cord research, Chris’s therapy and unexpected death, and Dana’s death from lung cancer seventeen months later at age forty-four. 2008.

Travels in a Blue Chair: Alaska to Zambia, Ushuaia to Uluru; a Series of Short Stories     DB/RC 67926
14 hours 9 minutes
by Walt Balenovich
read by Guy Williams
Balenovich, who had polio in childhood, recounts adventures in his blue-colored wheelchair—a device he believes does not confine him, but gives him the freedom to travel and meet new friends. Describes exploring Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, celebrating Chinese New Year in Thailand, and breaking a knee in Zambia. 2007.

Triumph over Darkness: The Life of Louis Braille     DB 68015
6 hours 21 minutes
by Lennard Bickel
read by Alexander Strain
Biography of Frenchman Louis Braille (1809–1852), who perfected a raised-dot alphabet code named in his honor when he was only fifteen. Discusses the development of the system of reading and writing that opened the world of learning for blind people. 1988.

The Unheard: A Memoir of Deafness and Africa     DB/RC 67060
8 hours 47 minutes
by Josh Swiller
read by Kevin Collins
Swiller, who lost his hearing during childhood, describes joining the Peace Corps at age twenty-three “to find a place,” he says, “past deafness.” Recounts his two-year stint and his attempts to improve conditions in a remote Zambian village plagued by poverty, disease, and violence. Strong language and some violence. 2007.

Winning the Disability Challenge: A Practical Guide to Successful Living     DB/RC 66824
6 hours 54 minutes
by John F. Tholen
read by Gary Tipton
Psychologist presents strategies and solutions to help disabled individuals adjust psychologically and emotionally after becoming occupationally impaired. Uses success stories from his clients to illustrate that accomplishments and enjoyment of life can continue. Offers positive affirmations, relationship suggestions, and practical information on government benefits. 2008.

Working like Dogs: The Service Dog Guidebook    RC 65497
6 hours 14 minutes
by Marcie Davis and Melissa Bunnell
read by Gabra Zackman
Guide to service dogs trained to assist people with mobility limitations. Describes the process of obtaining a service dog, caring for it, and retiring dogs that can no longer work. Includes assistance dog standards, a list of resources, and training programs. 2007.

Business and Economics

Andrew Carnegie    RC 65058
36 hours 22 minutes
by David Nasaw
read by Ted Stoddard
Biography of industrial baron and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie (1835–1919). Describes his rise from poor American immigrant to rich Pittsburgh steelmaker. Examines his business dealings and explains how he single-mindedly accumulated wealth, only to spend his retirement giving away money and crusading for world peace. Pulitzer Prize finalist. 2006.

The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World     DB/RC 68162
13 hours 2 minutes
by Niall Ferguson
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Harvard professor and author of Colossus: The Rise and Fall of the American Empire (RC 61407) pens an international history of money and finance. Discusses topics such as banks, bonds, stocks, real estate, and insurance, as well as the concepts of inflation and recessions. Companion to PBS special. Bestseller. 2008.

Bad Money: Reckless Finance, Failed Politics, and the Global Crisis of American Capitalism     DB/RC 66828
10 hours 41 minutes
by Kevin Phillips
read by John Polk
Author of American Theocracy (RC 61924) contends that the U.S. economy faces a looming crisis despite global dominance. Cites dependence on high-risk financial products such as asset-backed securities, collateralized debt obligations, and hedge funds. Examines the mortgage crisis and political and commercial implications of the dollar’s decline. 2008.

The Big Rich: The Rise and Fall of the Greatest Texas Oil Fortunes     DB 68452
20 hours 39 minutes
by Bryan Burrough
read by Robert Sams
Multigenerational history of four wealthy Texas oil families. Covers Roy Cullen, H.L. Hunt, Clint Murchison, and Sid Richardson, beginning with their wildcatting adventures in the early twentieth century. Discloses the families’ fierce competition, feuds, booms, bankruptcies, and eccentricities before their fall from prominence in the 1980s. 2009.

The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger     DB/RC 67484
14 hours 22 minutes
by Marc Levinson
read by Butch Hoover
Economist traces the development of the shipping container as a cheap means to transport goods, beginning in the 1950s. Explains its effects on the economic landscape, such as eliminating longshoremen’s jobs and changing port communities. Features Malcom McLean, a trucking company owner, as the major force behind this dynamic. 2006.

The Cigarette Century: The Rise, Fall, and Deadly Persistence of the Product That Defined America    RC 65067
23 hours 17 minutes
by Allan M. Brandt
read by Joe Peck
Historian chronicles the use of smoking tobacco in America in the twentieth century. Examines how shifts in consumer behavior, marketing strategies, and American culture and politics promoted cigarette use that subsequently declined as emerging medical technology revealed health risks. Discusses industry response and political maneuvering to suppress detrimental evidence. 2007.

Common Wealth: Economics for a Crowded Planet    RC 66596
14 hours 47 minutes
by Jeffrey D. Sachs
read by Ralph Lowenstein
U.N. advisor, author of The End of Poverty (RC 61244), suggests strategies for dealing with the global problems of environmental degradation, overpopulation, and extreme poverty. Emphasizes the need for a new era of international cooperation in the use of sustainable technologies to forestall resource depletion. 2008.

Enough. True Measures of Money, Business, and Life     DB/RC 68248
6 hours 42 minutes
by John C. Bogle
read by Jim Zeiger
Vanguard Mutual Fund founder criticizes rampant excess within corporations and the financial industry and advocates moderation, balance, and integrity in business and personal decisions. Uses anecdotes and market observations to illustrate the need for choosing value above cost, distinguishing between leadership and management, and focusing on character over success. 2009.

The Great Depression Ahead: How to Prosper in the Crash following the Greatest Boom in History     DB/RC 68118
12 hours 20 minutes
by Harry S. Dent Jr.
read by Erik Sandvold
Economist and author of The Roaring 2000s (RC 47081) and The Great Boom Ahead (RC 44174) analyzes demographic and technological cycles to predict economic trends into the mid-2030s. Offers short- and long-term portfolio-allocation strategies and suggests investments for individuals, governments, and businesses. Bestseller. 2008.

Internet Riches: The Simple Money-Making Secrets of Online Millionaires     DB/RC 66994
8 hours 18 minutes
by Scott Fox
read by Scott Fox
Business consultant describes simple methods for making money on the Internet, including some that require no start-up capital or technical training. Identifies e-business opportunities and ways to test ideas. Also offers legal, financial, and marketing advice. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World     DB/RC 68809
20 hours 57 minutes
by Liaquat Ahamed
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Details the financial history of the United States and Europe during the 1920s and 1930s. Chronicles events that led to the Great Depression and examines the central-bank decisions that influenced the world’s economic meltdown, including the stock-market crash, banking panics, and post-World War I war debts. 2009.

Mellon: An American Life    RC 65182
30 hours 4 minutes
by David Cannadine
read by Michele Schaeffer
Life of financier and philanthropist Andrew Mellon (1855–1937), who was Treasury secretary under presidents Harding, Coolidge, and Hoover. Describes how Mellon helped rebuild the post-World War I U.S. economy with laissez-faire capitalism. Discusses his establishment of the National Gallery of Art and his death before its completion. 2006.

Obama’s Challenge: America’s Economic Crisis and the Power of a Transformative Presidency     DB/RC 68226
8 hours 30 minutes
by Robert Kuttner
read by Guy Williams
Prior to Obama’s inauguration, journalist and economist examines the legacies of previous transformative presidents who changed the course of American history. Posits that Obama may be the right leader to provide viable solutions to the economic and political crises facing the United States and the forty-fourth president. 2008.

Oil     DB/RC 67563
3 hours 35 minutes
by James Laxer
read by Robert Sams
Canadian professor provides an overview of the modern oil industry from its nineteenth-century origins in North America and Russia to its twenty-first-century challenges. Describes the development of the world’s major petroleum companies and the environmental impact of fuel consumption. For senior high and older readers. 2008.

The One-Minute Entrepreneur: The Secret to Creating and Sustaining a Successful Business     DB/RC 67103
3 hours 1 minute
by Ken Blanchard and others
read by Jack Fox
The authors profile a fictional entrepreneur to demonstrate the typical challenges encountered when starting a business. They address issues such as finding revenue sources, securing customers, providing good service, and ensuring steady cash flow. 2008.

The Return of Depression Economics and the Crisis of 2008     DB/RC 68287
6 hours 53 minutes
by Paul Krugman
read by Patrick Downer
Nobel Prize-winning economist updates his 1999 book The Return of Depression Economics (RC 50206) to reevaluate the 1990s Asian financial crisis and explain the 2008 American credit meltdown. Contends that regulations failed to keep pace with an out-of-control financial system. Offers suggestions for recovery and prevention of recurrence. Bestseller. 2009.

Rigged: The True Story of an Ivy League Kid Who Changed the World of Oil, from Wall Street to Dubai     DB/RC 68314
9 hours 58 minutes
by Ben Mezrich
read by Erik Synnestvedt
Biography of an Italian American from Brooklyn who graduated from Harvard Business School and worked at the Mercantile Exchange trading in oil in 2002. Describes his responsibilities establishing a similar oil-exchange market in Dubai. Strong language. 2007.

The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life     DB 68285
42 hours 1 minute
by Alice Schroeder
read by Michael Scherer
Top Wall Street analyst offers a portrait of American businessman, investor, and philanthropist Warren Buffett (born 1930). Using Buffett’s personal files and interviews with friends and associates, author highlights financial and life lessons to be learned from the billionaire. Bestseller. 2008.

The Subprime Solution: How Today’s Global Financial Crisis Happened and What to Do about It     DB/RC 68505
4 hours 5 minutes
by Robert J. Shiller
read by Andy Pyle
Yale University economist analyzes the subprime mortgage crisis of 2007– 08. Asserts that the housing bubble was a major cause of the situation. Offers realistic proposals for short- and long-term solutions, including bailouts and an improved information infrastructure to restore the public’s confidence. 2008.

Supercapitalism: The Transformation of Business, Democracy, and Everyday Life    RC 66190
10 hours 11 minutes
by Robert B. Reich
read by Butch Hoover
Former U.S. labor secretary and author of The Future of Success (RC 51999) posits that the rise of free-market capitalism has weakened American democracy. Cites negative social consequences such as widening inequality and unfair taxation. Calls for abolition of the corporate income tax and separation of business and government. 2007.

Think Big and Kick Ass in Business and Life    RC 66388
8 hours 11 minutes
by Donald J. Trump and Bill Zanker
read by Peter Johnson
Learning Annex founder Zanker describes increasing his company’s annual profits from five million dollars to one hundred million, using the techniques he learned from New York mogul Trump. Trump provides anecdotes about his business deals and television show The Apprentice and offers advice on being confident and “thinking big.” 2007.

Where Have All the Leaders Gone?    RC 64556
7 hours 28 minutes
by Lee Iacocca
read by Dan Bloom
Former head of Ford and Chrysler lambastes the Bush administration, business leaders, and the media for the war in Iraq, the deficit, outsourcing, rising health care and gas costs, and other national woes. Shares leadership lessons from history and his own experience and urges readers to bring about change. Bestseller. 2007.

The World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy     DB/RC 68411
10 hours 32 minutes
by David M. Smick
read by Jim Bond
International Economy quarterly founder refutes theories presented by Thomas L. Friedman in The World Is Flat (RC 60317). Contends that global financial markets have created an uncertain, “curved” world with unpredictable events and consequences. Asserts that deregulation and entrepreneurship can solve America’s economic crisis. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

Careers and Job Training

The Career Chronicles: An Insider’s Guide to What Jobs Are Really Like; the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly from Over Seven Hundred Fifty Professionals     DB/RC 68211
8 hours 12 minutes
by Michael Gregory
read by Jack Fox
A former lawyer offers college students and young adults an overview of various professions. Discusses opportunities and includes comments from practitioners in medical, legal, financial, computer, sales, and media fields, among others. 2008.

Careers in Renewable Energy: Get a Green Energy Job     DB/RC 68195
7 hours 9 minutes
by Gregory McNamee
read by Gary Tipton
An overview of various forms of renewable energy—solar, wind, geothermal, hydroelectric, hydrogen, and bioenergy—and the career opportunities in this growing field. Discusses “green” jobs in building, management, and transportation. Details salaries, required education, and other employment criteria. For senior high readers. 2008.

Work 101: Learning the Ropes of the Workplace without Hanging Yourself     DB/RC 67206
8 hours 5 minutes
by Elizabeth Freedman
read by Margaret Strom
Corporate career consultant presents her office rules for the novice professional. Covers many aspects of work conduct, including building relationships with coworkers and supervisors, showcasing strengths in meetings, mastering communication, and handling promotions and resignations. Explains e-mail pitfalls and dress codes. 2007.

Computers

Computers for Seniors for Dummies     DB/RC 68356
7 hours 37 minutes
by Nancy Muir
read by Roy Avers
Step-by-step computer basics for mature users who want to learn how to buy a computer and access the Internet. Explains using the mouse, keyboard, and e-mail; working with files and folders; adding a printer, scanner, or fax machine; enjoying digital photography; listening to music; and playing games. 2008.

The Huffington Post Complete Guide to Blogging     DB/RC 68264
6 hours 41 minutes
edited by Huffington Post
read by Kristin Allison
Editors of Arianna Huffington’s influential Internet site give pointers on creating a successful web log, or blog, which is a regularly updated account of events on a website. Includes notable HuffPost entries and sidebars by many of its contributors. Recommends other websites and blogs. Some strong language. 2008.

The Numerati     DB 68479
7 hours 27 minutes
by Stephen Baker
read by Mark Ashby
BusinessWeek journalist explains data mining and analysis, a field that has greatly expanded with Internet use. Interviews the “numerati”—the people who gather and interpret the data on activities such as voting, shopping, blogging, dating, and terrorism. Discusses research on using data sensors in the home for personal health monitoring. 2008.

Consumerism

Bottlemania: How Water Went on Sale and Why We Bought It     DB/RC 67589
7 hours 51 minutes
by Elizabeth Royte
read by Bob Moore
Journalist and author of The Tapir’s Morning Bath (RC 54390) investigates social and environmental consequences of the bottled-water industry. Examines questionable business practices of companies, legal issues surrounding groundwater rights, the ramifications of plastic waste, and effects of production on local communities. Discusses differences between tap and bottled water. 2008.

Buyology: Truth and Lies about Why We Buy     DB/RC 68128
7 hours 52 minutes
by Martin Lindstrom
read by Jim Zeiger
Marketing expert explains “buyology,” his term for the subconscious thoughts, feelings, and desires that drive consumer decisions. Discusses findings from a three-year, multimillion-dollar neuromarketing experiment that gauged responses to products and advertisements and tried to determine the ways sex, religion, subliminal messages, and bodily senses influence purchasing. 2008.

The Emperor of Wine: The Rise of Robert M. Parker Jr. and the Reign of American Taste    RC 66269
14 hours 9 minutes
by Elin McCoy
read by Gabriella Cavallero
Journalist and wine critic follows the rise of Robert M. Parker Jr., developer of the one-hundred-point wine-rating system, from sipper of soft drinks to fine-wine connoisseur. Chronicles developments in wine production of the 1970s and discusses methods used to judge and to market wines. 2005.

Kitchen Literacy: How We Lost Knowledge of Where Food Comes From and Why We Need to Get It Back     DB/RC 66852
12 hours 13 minutes
by Ann Vileisis
read by Kerry Dukin
Award-winning historian chronicles changes in Americans’ awareness of food origins and production since the late eighteenth century. Cites the shift from an agrarian to an urban society and the rise of industrialized farming and of consumerism. Discusses the estrangement from nature and a counter-trend toward locally grown, organic foods. 2008.

Living like Ed     DB/RC 67200
6 hours 38 minutes
by Ed Begley Jr.
read by Steven Carpenter
Actor and longtime environmentalist Begley describes various methods and products that anyone can use daily to help the environment. Topics include making a home green and choosing ecofriendly energy sources and transportation methods. He provides tips on recycling, gardening, cooking, and clothing. 2008.

The Living Trust Advisor: Everything You Need to Know about Your Living Trust     DB/RC 67869
9 hours 25 minutes
by Jeffrey L. Condon
read by Lou Harpenau
Lawyer and coauthor of Beyond the Grave (RC 53267) discusses setting up a living trust as an after-death power-of-attorney vehicle. Discusses the fundamentals of asset protection, naming heirs, and minimizing taxes. Considers family situations involving children, grandchildren, remarriage, and debts, using examples from his clients. 2008.

Maxed Out: Hard Times, Easy Credit, and the Era of Predatory Lenders    RC 65747
7 hours 50 minutes
by James D. Scurlock
read by Erik Synnestvedt
Award-winning documentary filmmaker Scurlock recounts his cross-country journey to gauge the burden of consumer debt on individual Americans. Criticizes banks and credit card companies for offering high-interest, unsecured loans to disadvantaged or uninformed borrowers. Posits that collusion exists between the government and financial institutions. 2007.

Medicare Prescription Drug Coverage for Dummies     DB/RC 68185
18 hours 18 minutes
by Patricia Barry
read by Kerry Dukin
AARP editor examines Medicare and its Part D prescription-drug options from a consumer’s point of view. Discusses choosing or switching to an appropriate plan, avoiding a coverage gap and marketing scams, and filing grievances. Suggests ways family members can help loved ones with the paperwork. 2008.

Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness     DB/RC 67839
12 hours 16 minutes
by Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein
read by Butch Hoover
The authors believe that humans tend to make poor decisions because of bias, blunder, herd mentality, and temptation. They suggest that governments, institutions, and families create environments that encourage individuals to make better choices in all areas, including health, money, and education. 2008.

Organic, Inc.: Natural Foods and How They Grew    RC 66396
10 hours 12 minutes
by Samuel Fromartz
read by Ken Kliban
Business journalist traces the rise of the organic food industry in twentieth-century America. Examines consumer issues surrounding organics—food grown without using chemical fertilizers or pesticides—including health benefits and regulatory and ecological concerns. Explores market trends, distribution, branding, sales, and disparities between family-owned farms and multibillion-dollar corporations. 2006.

Predictably Irrational: The Hidden Forces That Shape Our Decisions     DB/RC 66153
9 hours 8 minutes
by Dan Ariely
read by John Polk
MIT professor draws on scientific experiments, observations, and principles of behavioral economics to demonstrate ways everyday decisions involving activities such as eating and shopping are affected by emotions, social norms, expectations, and other intangible forces. Suggests changing behavior patterns to make better, more reasonable choices. Bestseller. 2008.

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Cooking

The Art of Simple Food     DB/RC 67096
19 hours 10 minutes
by Alice Waters
read by Kerry Dukin
Restaurant owner and chef offers recipes based on principles that support local farmers and foods produced by sustainable, environmentally responsible, and humane methods. Includes suggestions for sauces, salads, soup, pasta, bread, grains, eggs, vegetables, fish, poultry, meat, and desserts. Offers tips on cooking techniques and pantry stocking. 2007.

Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors    RC 63425
13 hours 7 minutes
by Lizzie Collingham
read by Yolande Bavan
British historian depicts the development of Indian cuisine as the result of a long history of invaders and the mixing of foreign food cultures. Describes how Indian culinary traditions have spread around the world. Includes recipes and a glossary of Indian terms. 2006.

The Ethical Gourmet     DB/RC 66370
11 hours 43 minutes
by Jay Weinstein
read by Butch Hoover
Guide to purchasing and preparing environmentally friendly and ethically produced foods. Includes more than one hundred recipes featuring organic fruits and vegetables and humanely raised meat and poultry. Provides information on pesticides, agriculture, and aquaculture, as well as shopping tips and resources for finding ingredients. 2006.

The Family Style Soul Food Diabetes Cookbook     DB/RC 67323
7 hours 39 minutes
by Roniece A. Weaver and others
read by Kerry Dukin
Guide to adapting soul food—cuisine originated by slaves in the South—for diabetics. Explains ways to improve the nutritional content of popular African American dishes and create heart-healthy substitutions. Provides recipes for favorites such as grits, crawfish étoufée, and bread pudding. Offers shopping tips and ideas for church-group meals. 2006.

Farmer John’s Cookbook: The Real Dirt on Vegetables    RC 64312
20 hours 52 minutes
by Farmer John Peterson and Angelic Organics
read by Gregory Gorton
Farmer John Peterson, who runs Angelic Organics, a community-supported-agriculture farm near Chicago, presents anecdotes and insights into growing and preparing more than thirty-five vegetables. Crop information is arranged by season and includes hundreds of recipes from Peterson and various shareholders as well as essays on biodynamic farming. 2006.

Feeding the Healthy Vegetarian Family     DB/RC 66856
13 hours 5 minutes
by Ken Haedrich
read by Gary Tipton
Food writer and father of four offers recipes and advice for vegetarian families. Presents a wide variety of dishes that are quick to prepare and contain easy-to-find ingredients. The selections allow families to explore different styles of vegetarianism—including vegan and lacto-ovo diets. 1998.

The Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of  Chinese Food     DB/RC 67637
11 hours 24 minutes
by Jennifer 8. Lee
read by Elisabeth Rodgers
New York Times reporter describes her quest to understand the popularity of Chinese restaurants. Relates her discovery that many aspects of the industry, such as chop suey and take-out cartons, are American. Discusses Asian immigration issues, kosher food, and her search for the best restaurant. Strong language. 2008.

The Good Food Cookbook for Dogs: Fifty Home-Cooked Recipes for the Health and Happiness of Your Canine Companion     DB/RC 65785
2 hours 19 minutes
by Donna Twichell Roberts
read by Jill Fox
Wholesome human recipes adapted for dogs. Includes suggestions for stews, casseroles, treats, gravies and sauces, ethnic specialties, party and holiday food, and dishes for dogs with special needs such as kidney and heart disease or allergies. Provides basic nutrition information, feeding guidelines, and time-saving tips on food storage. 2004.

Martha Stewart’s Cookies: The Very Best Treats to Bake and to Share     DB/RC 66148
12 hours 2 minutes
edited by Martha Stewart Living staff
read by Madelyn Buzzard
Presents 175 cookie recipes with textures such as soft and chewy, crumbly and sandy, and chunky and nutty. Covers easy-to-make traditional drop cookies as well as fruit bars, meringues, icebox spirals, biscotti, and more. Includes ideas for packaging and information about tools and techniques. Bestseller. 2008.

Moosewood Restaurant Simple Suppers: Fresh Ideas for the Weeknight Table     DB/RC 66340
8 hours 4 minutes
by Moosewood Collective
read by Gary Tipton
Dozens of recipes for meals that can be prepared quickly and require only a few nonperishable pantry items and high-quality fresh ingredients. Dishes include pasta, beans, tofu, salads, sandwiches, sauces, grains, and fish. Provides tips on substitutions and variations, cooking techniques, and advance meal preparation as well as suggestions for leftovers. 2005.

New Recipes from Moosewood Restaurant     DB/RC 66626
9 hours 30 minutes
by Moosewood Collective
read by Gary Tipton
Seventeen members of the Moosewood Collective, a worker-owned and -operated restaurant in Ithaca, New York, offer vegetarian recipes inspired by ethnic and international cuisine that use fresh, seasonal ingredients. Includes suggestions for chilled and hot soups, salads and dressings, sandwiches, sauces, fish, pasta, sides, breads, and desserts. 1987.

The Pat Conroy Cookbook: Recipes of My Life    DB/RC 67321
9 hours 47 minutes
by Pat Conroy
read by Roy Avers
Anecdotes and recipes from the author of The Prince of Tides (RC 25248). Traces his passion for eating and cooking to his southern upbringing and his time in France and Italy. Reminiscing about favorite places, teachers, and meals, Conroy intermixes suggestions for dozens of dishes using high-quality, fresh ingredients. 2004.

Rosa’s New Mexican Table     DB/RC 66625
11 hours 4 minutes
by Roberto Santibañez
read by Gary Tipton
A variety of dishes from the chef of the New York restaurant Rosa Mexicano. Provides information on ingredients, equipment, and cooking techniques often used in Mexican cuisine. Includes recipes for chicken flautas, tortilla soup, red rice, refried beans, crab enchiladas, and poblanos stuffed with spinach and goat cheese. 2007.

Southern Living: Forty Years of Our Best Recipes     DB/RC 67322
12 hours 8 minutes
edited by Jane Elizabeth Lorberau
read by Kerry Dukin
Cookbook presents Southern Living’s top recipes and test-kitchen secrets since 1966. Reviews four decades of the magazine’s culinary history and includes over two hundred fifty recipes for everyday meals, one-dish wonders, party starters, grilled selections, light fare, holiday favorites, desserts, and, of course, southern classics. 2007.

Yum-o! The Family Cookbook     DB/RC 66865
5 hours 34 minutes
by Rachael Ray
read by Erin Jones
Food Network host Ray suggests ways to make healthful eating easier, more affordable, and fun for families. Offers recipes designed to encourage children to help prepare meals. Provides ideas for breakfasts, lunches, snacks, and dinners, including rollover suppers that make use of leftovers. 2008.

Crime

After the Fire: A True Story of Friendship and Survival     DB/RC 68376
6 hours 31 minutes
by Robin Gaby Fisher
read by Alec Volz
Chronicles the recovery of two burn victims, roommates Shawn Simons and Alvaro Llanos, who survived the January 2000 fire that was deliberately set at a Seton Hall University dorm in New Jersey. Traces the investigation into the blaze that killed three students and injured dozens. 2008.

Blood Justice    RC 64384
14 hours 15 minutes
by Tom Henderson
read by John Haag
Discusses the investigation by Michigan’s cold-case squad into the rape and murder of two women—music professor Margarette Eby in 1985 and flight attendant Nancy Ludwig in 1991—years after their deaths. Describes the use of DNA evidence to find and convict the killer in 2002. Violence and strong language. 2004.

Ceremonial Violence: A Psychological Explanation of School Shootings     DB 68341
17 hours 9 minutes
by Jonathan Fast
read by Bob Moore
Professor researches thirteen cases of school rampage shootings from 1974 to 1999 to explore psychological theories about the murderers’ motives. Profiles lone female killer Brenda Spencer and the Columbine attack by two assailants. Outlines prevention, intervention, and crisis-response strategies for educators, parents, and students. Violence and strong language. 2008.

Coroner’s Journal: Stalking Death in Louisiana    RC 65002
9 hours 59 minutes
by Louis Cataldie
read by John Polk
Louisiana state medical examiner shares his experiences working as a coroner beginning in 1993. Recounts memorable cases in which he surveyed crime scenes, collected forensic evidence, performed autopsies, and helped solve murders. Also describes tending the sick, injured, and dead following Hurricane Katrina. Violence and some strong language. 2006.

A Dance with the Devil: A True Story of Marriage to a Psychopath     DB/RC 68464
11 hours 36 minutes
by Barbara Bentley
read by Annie Wauters
A California-based advocate for victims reveals details about her marriage to a man who impersonated an admiral. Discloses the emotional and financial abuse she suffered prior to his attempt to murder her in 1991. Offers warning signs that suggest someone is a psychopath. Strong language and some violence. 2008.

Havana Nocturne: How the Mob Owned Cuba—and Then Lost It to the Revolution     DB/RC 67536
14 hours 34 minutes
by T.J. English
read by Bill Wallace
Author documents from primary sources the late-1940s and early-1950s dominance of Havana’s entertainment industries by American organized crime, all beyond the U.S. government’s reach. Describes Meyer Lansky’s and Lucky Luciano’s ties to Cuban dictator Batista’s regime before Castro’s 1959 takeover. Some violence, some strong language, and some descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 2008.

If Looks Could Kill     DB/RC 66984
12 hours 8 minutes
by M. William Phelps
read by Jay Charles
Traces the police investigation into a motorcyclist’s execution of Jeff Zack in an Akron, Ohio, parking lot in 2001. Describes Zack’s lifestyle of adultery, lies, and financial dealings that led police to a suspect with a deadly motive. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

The Killing of Major Denis Mahon: A Mystery of Old Ireland     DB/RC 67013
13 hours 24 minutes
by Peter Duffy
read by Jim Zeiger
Researches the pivotal 1847 murder of Anglo Irish landlord Denis Mahon during the Great Irish Famine of 1845–1850. Details the conditions that led to animosity between Mahon and his laborers, including the tactics he used to rid his property of unwanted tenants: bribery, evictions, and emigration aboard disease-ridden ships. 2007.

Lethal Guardian     DB/RC 66985
13 hours 33 minutes
by M. William Phelps
read by Jay Charles
Describes Connecticut real-estate lawyer Beth Carpenter’s attempt to obtain guardianship of her two-year-old niece after Beth’s estranged sister married former exotic dancer Buzz Clinton. Discusses Beth’s plan to win custody—allegedly hiring hit men in 1994 to kill Clinton. Strong language, some violence, and some descriptions of sex. Commercial audiobook. 2004.

McMafia: A Journey through the Global Criminal Underworld     DB/RC 67165
17 hours 47 minutes
by Misha Glenny
read by Bill Wallace
Former BBC world correspondent examines the globalization of organized crime. Asserts that the Russian mafia, Colombian drug cartels, Chinese labor smugglers, and other sources of illegal trade fueled by Western demand exploit new technology and the poverty of developing nations. Discusses links between global crime and terrorism. Some strong language. 2008.

Mortal Danger: And Other True Cases; Ann Rule’s Crime Files, Volume 13     DB/RC 68225
12 hours 22 minutes
by Ann Rule
read by Martha Harmon Pardee
In “Mortal Danger” a stewardess met the man of her dreams—only to realize later that he was a psychopath. In “Written in Blood” an ex-con with a gruesome past slaughtered his newlywed neighbors. Three other murder cases complete the anthology. Violence, descriptions of sex, and some strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

Out There: The In-Depth Story of the Astronaut Love Triangle Case That Shocked America     DB/RC 68480
8 hours 4 minutes
by Diane Fanning
read by Annie Wauters
Details circumstances surrounding NASA astronaut Lisa Nowak’s 2007 assault on Air Force captain Colleen Shipman, who was dating Nowak’s former lover, fellow astronaut Bill Oefelein. Describes events leading up to and following the attack, including Nowak’s career highlights and her arrest. Some strong language. 2007.

Supermob: How Sidney Korshak and His Criminal Associates Became America’s Hidden Power Brokers     DB/RC 66754
28 hours 21 minutes
by Gus Russo
read by Jake Williams
Asserts that the Supermob—capitalists who covertly fronted for organized crime—influenced the U.S. economy from the 1930s through the 1980s. Focuses on Chicago-born Jewish attorney Sidney “the Fixer” Korshak, who allegedly brokered Hollywood and Mafia deals involving casino monopolies and land seized from interned Japanese Americans. Violence and strong language. 2006.

The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective     DB/RC 67266
10 hours 52 minutes
by Kate Summerscale
read by Kristin Allison
Examines the 1860 murder of three-year-old Saville Kent on an English estate. Chronicles the investigation by Scotland Yard detective inspector Jonathan Whicher, who suspected a Kent family member but, due to controversial methods and lack of evidence, found himself widely scorned. Describes this case’s inspiration of the detective-novel genre. Edgar Award nominee. 2008.

The Terminal Spy: A True Story of Espionage, Betrayal, and Murder     DB/RC 67648
15 hours 31 minutes
by Alan S. Cowell
read by Frank Coffee
New York Times correspondent probes the November 2006 poisoning in London of former KGB agent Alexander Litvinenko, who apparently ingested polonium-210, a rare radioactive isotope, after meeting with former colleague Andrei Lugovoi. Discusses the subsequent investigation and likely suspects, as well as the political implications of the murder. 2008.

Diet and Nutrition

The Best Life Diet    RC 65026
11 hours 54 minutes
by Bob Greene
read by Gary Tipton
Author of the Get with the Program! books (RC 54029 and RC 56019) discusses how to lose weight and keep it off by making long-term changes that take into account lifestyles and social rituals. Explains how to gradually change habits. Includes recipes and a foreword by Oprah Winfrey. Bestseller. 2006.

Flat Belly Diet! A Flat Belly Is about Food and Attitude. Period. (Not a  Single Crunch Required)     DB/RC 68510
10 hours 25 minutes
by Liz Vaccariello
read by Kerry Dukin
Editor of Prevention magazine joins with its nutrition director to outline ways of eliminating excess abdominal fat. They describe a four-day antibloat jump-start program and a four-week diet; recommend including mono-unsaturated fats, such as dark chocolate, olives, or nuts, with each meal; and provide recipes and optional exercises. Bestseller. 2008.

Rethinking Thin: The New Science of Weight Loss—and the Myths and Realities of Dieting     DB/RC 67377
9 hours 30 minutes
by Gina Kolata
read by Margaret Strom
Science writer Kolata examines the history of dieting in America and the state of knowledge regarding weight loss. Describes the 2004–06 national study that compared the Atkins diet to a low-fat plan. Presents participant accounts. Concludes that dieting to maintain a weight below an individual’s preset range is futile. 2007.

The South Beach Diet Supercharged: Faster Weight Loss and Better Health for Life     DB/RC 67298
11 hours 59 minutes
by Arthur Agatston
read by Gary Tipton
Cardiologist stresses healthy eating principles along with a “metabolism-revving exercise program” for sustained weight loss and optimal health. Suggests interval walking and a total body workout to attain an ideal weight and strengthen core muscles. Includes sample meal plans and recipes. Bestseller. 2008.

Tell Me What to Eat if I Have Acid Reflux: Nutrition You Can Live With     DB/RC 67874
5 hours 20 minutes
by Elaine Magee
read by Kerry Dukin
Nutritionist presents an overview of gastroesophageal reflux disease—also known as GERD or acid reflux. Describes how diet and lifestyle changes can decrease heartburn, discusses medical treatments, and offers sample recipes—including those for the holidays —and simple steps to lose weight. 2009.

You Can Eat That! Awesome Food for Kids with Diabetes     DB/RC 66342
6 hours 18 minutes
by Robyn Webb
read by Kerry Dukin
Nutritionist Webb discusses diabetes management for children and provides kid-friendly recipes for smoothies, packed lunches, snacks, sweets, soups, and main entrees designed to meet a diabetic’s requirements. Includes food suggestions for parties and holidays. 2007.

Education

Relentless Pursuit: A Year in the Trenches with Teach For America     DB/RC 67950
16 hours 50 minutes
by Donna Foote
read by Jill Ferris
Follows the daily struggles of four Teach For America instructors at Los Angeles’s Locke High School in Watts. Describes the 1990 establishment of this national teaching corps by Princeton grad Wendy Kopp, whose goal was to recruit and train the “best and brightest” to teach in the lowest-performing schools. 2008.

Smart Kids, Bad Schools: Thirty-eight Ways to Save America’s Future     DB/RC 67931
10 hours 50 minutes
by Brian Crosby
read by Joe Wilson
Believing that better schools would produce better citizens capable of contributing to American society, the author, an experienced teacher, proposes a complete transformation of the U.S. educational system in thirty-eight steps. Advocates bold changes: lengthening the school day and year, adding vocational schools, abolishing homework, and increasing field trips. Some strong language. 2008.

Family

Generation Text: Raising Well-Adjusted Kids in an Age of Instant Everything     DB/RC 68399
11 hours 8 minutes
by Michael Osit
read by Dan John Miller
Clinical psychologist addresses the influence of technology on children. Advises parents on ways to moderate the craving for instant gratification and help their child develop social skills, manage social networking, and set priorities. Uses anecdotes from his practice to provide guidance. Some strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

Growing Up Green: Baby and Childcare    RC 66672
11 hours 7 minutes
by Deirdre Imus
read by Colleen Delany
Author of The Imus Ranch: Cooking for Kids and Cowboys (RC 61309) suggests ways to reduce children’s exposure to environmental toxins throughout each stage of their development. Discusses sources and effects of various chemicals. Provides advice about vaccinations, sun protection, consumer products, nutrition, fitness, and the dangers of plastics. Includes recipes and resources. 2008.

Have a New Kid by Friday: How to Change Your Child’s Attitude, Behavior, and Character in Five Days     DB/RC 67777
8 hours 40 minutes
by Kevin Leman
read by Erik Synnestvedt
Psychologist and author of The New Birth Order Book (RC 52622) offers parents ways to reverse negative behavior in their offspring. Suggests practical strategies for regaining control, such as maintaining a cheerful facade and not repeating instructions. Advises against trying to be the child’s friend. 2008.

Identical Strangers: A Memoir of Twins Separated and Reunited     DB/RC 66863
8 hours 36 minutes
by Elyse Schein and Paula Bernstein
read by Erin Jones
Authors describe learning in their mid-thirties that they are identical twins who as infants were separated by a New York adoption agency. They recount their experiences before and after being reunited and discuss their birth mother and the nature versus nurture study that separated them. Some strong language. 2007.

Gardening

Creating Beds and Borders: Creative Ideas from America’s Best Gardeners     DB/RC 65770
5 hours 37 minutes
by Fine Gardening Magazine staff
read by Butch Hoover
The authors explain that borders are planting areas viewed from one side, whereas beds are freestanding islands. They recommend design strategies, plants, and techniques to create both types of gardens. They discuss planting in wet, shady spots, creating raised beds, developing all-season borders, and designing a warm-climate display. 2001.

Dog-Friendly Gardens, Garden-Friendly Dogs     DB/RC 66349
6 hours 36 minutes
by Cheryl S. Smith
read by Kerry Dukin
Tips on harmoniously keeping both a garden and a dog. Provides recommendations for bed design and vegetation, including groundcovers and grass, and warns against harmful plants and products. Covers mulches, composts, vegetables, paths, fencing, and some aspects of dog play. Discusses designating pet-digging areas. 2004.

The Elements of Organic Gardening: Highgrove, Clarence House, Birkhall     DB/RC 66180
5 hours 39 minutes
by Charles, Prince of Wales
read by Butch Hoover
The Prince of Wales discusses the organic gardens he helped design and maintain during twenty-six years at Highgrove, and the two gardens he managed in London and Scotland after his grandmother’s death. Describes using organic principles and stewardship to create a sustainable garden. 2007.

Fallscaping: Extending Your Garden Season into Autumn    DB/RC 66173
7 hours 58 minutes
by Nancy J. Ondra and Stephanie Cohen
read by Jill Fox
After introducing key plants for providing fall blooms, berries, seedheads, and foliage, the authors offer advice on combining these to create gardens that look good not only in the autumn, but in one or more other seasons as well. Includes a fall garden-care primer and lists gardening techniques. 2007.

Gardening at the Dragon’s Gate: At Work in the Wild and Cultivated World     DB/RC 67452
19 hours 57 minutes
by Wendy Johnson
read by Jill Ferris
Johnson, a founder of the organic Farm and Garden Program at Green Gulch Farm Zen Center in Marin County, California, discusses her meditative gardening life, describes seven principles that influence her garden work, and provides detailed instruction for following her example. 2008.

Gardening When It Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times     DB/RC 68366
15 hours 28 minutes
by Steve Solomon
read by Butch Hoover
Longtime gardener and past proponent of the intensive-gardening trend has switched to espousing the benefits of extensive vegetable gardening—spacing seedlings far apart to yield larger plants that use less water, fertilizer, and labor. Also discusses tools, compost, and pests. 2005.

Government and Politics

American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House     DB/RC 68010
21 hours 28 minutes
by Jon Meacham
read by Robert Sams
Newsweek editor and author of Franklin and Winston (RC 57644) describes the expansion of the power of the American president begun in 1829 by Andrew Jackson. Highlights Jackson’s belief in the will of the common man and discusses the development of the Democratic Party under his leadership. Pulitzer Prize. Bestseller. 2008.

Bush’s Law: The Remaking of American Justice     DB/RC 67617
15 hours 7 minutes
by Eric Lichtblau
read by Ralph Lowenstein
New York Times reporter Lichtblau expands on his Pulitzer Prize-winning stories about the NSA wiretapping program in this investigative overview of President George W. Bush’s war on terror. Asserts that the power given to the NSA, the FBI, and the CIA has eroded the rights of individuals. 2008.

Churchill and the Jews: A Lifelong Friendship     DB/RC 67822
10 hours 41 minutes
by Martin Gilbert
read by Barry Bernson
Author of Churchill: A Life (RC 36039) examines the British leader’s commitment to Jewish concerns from the early days of his political career. Traces his sympathy for Jewish war refugees, efforts to secure them a homeland in Palestine between the world wars, and support for the creation of Israel. 2007.

Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History     DB/RC 67000
22 hours 21 minutes
by Ted Sorensen
read by Bill Wallace
Nebraska-born Sorensen, advisor and speechwriter for President John F. Kennedy from 1953 to 1963, highlights his role in writing Profiles in Courage (RC 58855) and in the events that engulfed the nation during Kennedy’s term, including the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. Sorensen also discusses his later political and legal career. Bestseller. 2008.

Declare Yourself: Speak, Connect, Act, Vote; More than Fifty Celebrated Americans Tell You Why     DB/RC 67649
6 hours 29 minutes
published by HarperCollins Publishers
read by Judith Ann Gantly
Actors, authors, musicians, and celebrities encourage young people to vote. Maya Angelou, Tyra Banks, Meg Cabot, Rosario Dawson, Sean Kingston, Maroon 5 band members, Hayden Panettiere, Alice Walker, and others discuss the importance of participating in politics. Includes resources. Introduction by America Ferrera. For senior high and older readers. 2008.

Descent into Chaos: The United States and the Failure of Nation Building in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Central Asia     DB/RC 66995
19 hours 18 minutes
by Ahmed Rashid
read by Arthur Morey
Pakistani journalist, author of Taliban (RC 52899) and Jihad (RC 53807), examines the American-led strategies to defeat Islamic extremism in his country and in the  reconstruction of Afghanistan. Describes the problems and suggests reforms that include a commitment to nation building. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

Dirty Diplomacy: The Rough-and-Tumble Adventures of a Scotch-Drinking, Skirt-Chasing, Dictator-Busting, and Thoroughly Unrepentant Ambassador Stuck on the Frontline of the War against Terror    RC 66083
15 hours 30 minutes
by Craig Murray
read by Steven Crossley
Author recalls his brief (2002–2005) stint as the British ambassador in Uzbekistan, describing a brutal totalitarian state run by corrupt dictator Islam Karimov—an ally of the West. Murray relates the times when his conscience caused him to speak out against torture, imprisonments, and murder. 2006

The Essential Writings of Machiavelli     DB/RC 67703
19 hours 31 minutes
by Niccolò Machiavelli
read by Roy Avers
Selected writings of Florentine politician Niccolò Machiavelli (1468– 1527), in which he expounds his philosophy on government and power. Includes The Prince, The Mandrake—a satire, excerpts from The Art of War and The Discourses, and essays about Pisa, French people, Germany, and the ruling Medici. Edited and translated by Peter Constantine. 2007.

Fidel Castro: My Life; a Spoken Autobiography     DB/RC 65686
35 hours 55 minutes
by Fidel Castro and Ignacio Ramonet
read by Roy Avers
Journalist’s one hundred hours of interviews with Fidel Castro between 2003 and 2005 cover the Cuban leader’s personal and political life—from his schooling to his role in the victory over Batista. They discuss the Bay of Pigs, African independence movements, views on human rights, homosexuality, and Cuba’s future. 2006.

Golda     DB/RC 67548
14 hours 57 minutes
by Elinor Burkett
read by Kristin Allison
Biography of Golda Meir (1898–1978), one of the founders of the State of Israel. Describes her childhood in Russia, her family’s immigration to the United States, and her dedication to Zionism. Examines her term as prime minister, her presence on the world political stage, and her legacy. 2008.

James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights     DB/RC 65857
13 hours 14 minutes
by Richard Labunski
read by Ted Stoddard
Professor analyzes James Madison’s influence on the formation of the U.S. Constitution and its first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights. Provides a detailed account of the debate between Madison and anti-Federalist Patrick Henry over the ratification of the Constitution and describes Madison’s hard-won election to Congress. 2006.

John Wilkes: The Scandalous Father of Civil Liberty    RC 65147
22 hours 24 minutes
by Arthur H. Cash
read by Kerry Dukin
Biography of English journalist and politician John Wilkes (1727–1797). Chronicles Wilkes’s life and career as an outspoken advocate of religious tolerance, parliamentary reform, and civil liberties. Examines Wilkes’s reputation as a libertine, his expulsion from the House of Commons, and his influence on America’s founding fathers and the Constitution. 2006.

Judgment Days: Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King Jr., and the Laws That Changed America     DB/RC 66592
23 hours 11 minutes
by Nick Kotz
read by Peter Johnson
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist details the partnership between Johnson and King that enabled the passing of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, 1965, and 1968. Stresses that the men’s common values, love of the South, and belief in American democracy fostered their success despite their division over the Vietnam War. 2005.

A Matter of Justice: Eisenhower and the Beginning of the Civil Rights Revolution     DB/RC 68393
11 hours 43 minutes
by David A. Nichols
read by Lou Harpenau
Details President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s post-World War II contribution to the civil rights movement. Primary documents trace the administration’s initiatives, including desegregating the nation’s armed services, capital city, and public schools; appointing progressive federal judges; and passing legislation that led to the 1957 and 1960 Civil Rights Acts. 2007.

The New Cold War: Putin’s Russia and the Threat to the West     DB/RC 67481
13 hours 0 minutes
by Edward Lucas
read by Bill Wallace
Former Moscow bureau chief for the Economist alleges that Russia is a growing threat to the West under Vladimir Putin’s regime. Lucas cites human rights abuses, crackdowns on the media and dissidents, widespread fraud, intimidation of former Soviet satellite nations, and the danger Russia poses as a major energy supplier. 2008.

Obama’s Challenge: America’s Economic Crisis and the Power of a Transformative Presidency     DB/RC 68226
8 hours 30 minutes
by Robert Kuttner
read by Guy Williams
Prior to Obama’s inauguration, journalist and economist examines the legacies of previous transformative presidents who changed the course of American history. Posits that Obama may be the right leader to provide viable solutions to the economic and political crises facing the United States and the forty-fourth president. 2008.

A Path out of the Desert: A Grand Strategy for America in the Middle East     DB/RC 67791
18 hours 39 minutes
by Kenneth M. Pollack
read by Mark Ashby
Middle East expert, author of The Persian Puzzle (RC 60252) and The Threatening Storm (RC 54856), advocates for a continuing U.S. involvement in the region for security and economic reasons. Analyzes the area’s social and political problems and recommends gradual reforms. 2008.

Pearls, Politics, and Power: How Women Can Win and Lead     DB 68677
9 hours 25 minutes
by Madeleine M.  Kunin
read by Faith Potts
Vermont’s first female governor calls on women to assume more leadership roles in politics and bring issues such as family, education, health care, the environment, and diplomacy to the forefront. Profiles notables past and present, including journalist Gloria Steinem, to highlight women’s experiences in public office. 2008.

Promises to Keep: On Life and Politics     DB/RC 67337
17 hours 42 minutes
by Joe Biden
read by Jim Zeiger
Autobiography of the U.S. senator from Delaware who was first elected to Congress in 1972 at age twenty-nine. Recalls his Irish Catholic upbringing in Scranton, Pennsylvania, and Wilmington and the tragic deaths of his first wife and daughter. Highlights political and social issues that arose during his tenure. 2007.

Reconciliation: Islam, Democracy, and the West    RC 66112
12 hours 44 minutes
by Benazir Bhutto
read by Annie Wauters
Former prime minister of Pakistan recounts her 2007 return home after eight years in exile. She calls for reconciliation among religions and nations, boldly asserts the true nature of Islam, and offers a practical road map for bringing societies together. Bestseller. 2008.

Renegade: The Making of a President     DB/RC 69086
15 hours 44 minutes
by Richard Wolffe
read by L.J. Ganser
Newsweek reporter Wolffe analyzes the 2008 presidential campaign of Barack Obama. Drawing on dozens of interviews with the candidate and president, Wolffe discusses Obama’s career in Illinois politics, decision to run for higher office, and grass-roots tactics. Details regional power structures and Obama’s rivalry with Hillary Clinton’s camp. Bestseller. 2009.

The Revolution: A Manifesto     DB/RC 67036
5 hours 35 minutes
by Ron Paul
read by Frank Coffee
Libertarian congressman from Texas calls for a return to what he considers the American principles endorsed by the founding fathers: “liberty, self-government, the Constitution, and a noninterventionist foreign policy.” Discusses these ideas and also personal freedom and money issues. Offers suggestions for change. Bestseller. 2008.

Sarah: How a Hockey Mom Turned the Political Establishment Upside Down    DB/RC 67508
3 hours 17 minutes
by Kaylene Johnson
read by Catherine Byers
Chronicles the political career of Sarah Palin, from her 1992 election to the Wasilla, Alaska, city council to her 2006–2008 term as Alaska’s first female governor. Describes Palin’s populist reform ideas that propelled her into the leadership position in her state. Discusses her upbringing, marriage, and family. Bestseller. 2008.

The Shadow Factory: The Ultra-Secret NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America     DB/RC 67885
14 hours 1 minute
by James Bamford
read by Lou Harpenau
Follow-up to The Puzzle Palace (RC 19096) and Body of Secrets (RC 52277) continues the history of the U.S. National Security Agency. Concentrates on the war on terror after the September 11, 2001, Al Qaeda attacks on America. Highlights interagency rivalries and the use of warrantless wiretapping. 2008.

Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man: A Biography    RC 66904
4 hours 1 minute
by Christopher Hitchens
read by Robert Sams
Hitchens analyzes Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man, which was first published in 1791 as a rebuttal to Edmund Burke’s 1790 Reflections on the Revolution in France. Posits that Paine’s criticism of monarchy and introduction of the concept of human rights is the philosophical cornerstone of American democracy. 2006.

Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution     DB/RC 66397
10 hours 3 minutes
by Woody Holton
read by Peter Johnson
History professor asserts that the ratifiers of the Constitution were more concerned with attracting investors to America than with protecting civil liberties. Discusses citizens’ reactions to the original document and the small-farmers rebellions that impelled the passage of the Bill of Rights. National Book Award finalist. 2007.

The Way of the World: A Story of Truth and Hope in an Age of Extremism     DB/RC 69146
15 hours 28 minutes
by Ron Suskind
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of The One Percent Doctrine (RC 62715) asserts that the war with Iraq was begun based on falsified documents and that America has lost its moral compass. Warns of nuclear terrorism and bemoans missed opportunities for diplomacy. Strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington’s Culture of Deception     DB/RC 66655
14 hours 26 minutes
by Scott McClellan
read by Butch Hoover
Former White House press secretary (2003–2006) discusses the inner workings of the George W. Bush White House. Offers his view on key players Dick Cheney, Karl Rove, and Condoleezza Rice. Also covers major events such as the 9/11 terrorist attack, the war in Iraq, and Hurricane Katrina. Bestseller. 2008.

What’s Wrong with Obamamania? Black America, Black Leadership, and the Death of Political Imagination     DB/RC 67079
6 hours 13 minutes
by Ricky L. Jones
read by Andy Pyle
Pan-African studies professor chronicles black political leadership in America and questions whether 2008 presidential candidate Barack Obama is committed to the “freedom agenda” of past African American activists who sought justice and equality. Criticizes hip-hop culture, wealthy ministers, and the co-optation and compromises of some civil rights figures. 2008.

William Wilberforce: The Life of the Great Anti-Slave Trade Campaigner     DB/RC 67041
26 hours 23 minutes
by William Hague
read by George Holmes
Biography of British parliamentarian William Wilberforce (1759–1833), who passed the 1807 Slave Trade Abolition Bill and legislation to reform the morality of England. Details the military and political wars of Wilberforce’s era, his ties to colleague William Pitt the Younger, and his 1785 conversion to Christian evangelicalism. 2007.

Home Management

If I Had a Hammer: More than One Hundred Easy Fixes and Weekend Projects     DB/RC 67825
11 hours 42 minutes
by Andrea Ridout
read by Kerry Dukin
Renovation expert and host of radio’s Ask Andrea offers step-by-step instructions for do-it-yourself home-improvement projects at all skill levels. Tasks include painting and decorating, caring for wood floors and furniture, remodeling kitchens and bathrooms, and maintaining appliances. Provides time-saving tips and advice on proper tools and techniques. 2008.

Rightsizing Your Life: Simplifying Your Surroundings While Keeping What Matters Most     DB/RC 67113
10 hours 58 minutes
by Ciji Ware
read by Carol Dines
Aiming her advice primarily at mid-lifers who are relocating, Ware describes ways to deal with the practical and emotional aspects of winnowing possessions to fit a new lifestyle and a smaller living space. Includes seven steps to accomplish rightsizing, tips on maintaining the changes, and a resource directory. 2007.

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Humor

Are You There, Vodka? It’s Me Chelsea     DB/RC 66827
7 hours 33 minutes
by Chelsea Handler
read by Madelyn Buzzard
Personal essays by stand-up comedian and star of the television show Chelsea Lately. Covers her short-lived attempt to get in shape, obsession with midgets, incarceration for using a fake ID, and experiences in London with an overzealous friend. Strong language and some explicit descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 2008.

Jokes to Go: One Thousand Three Hundred Eighty-six of the Funniest Bits from the Best Comedians     DB/RC 67123
6 hours 3 minutes
edited by Judy Brown
read by Jack Fox
One-liners, quips, and humorous observations arranged alphabetically by topic. Includes favorites of Dave Barry, Mel Brooks, Johnny Carson, Bill Cosby, Ellen DeGeneres, Tina Fey, Whoopi Goldberg, Jay Leno, David Letterman, George Lopez, Dennis Miller, and Conan O’Brien, who cover everything from breakups and marriages to sports and taxes. 2003.

When You Are Engulfed in Flames     DB/RC 67035
9 hours 55 minutes
by David Sedaris
read by Nick Sullivan
Humor essayist recounts his experiences at home and abroad, including his encounter with dingoes in Australia, purchase of a skeleton in France, and attempt to quit smoking in Tokyo. The book title comes from a safety brochure Sedaris found in Hiroshima. Strong language and some descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 2008.

Inspiration

Become a Better You: Seven Keys to Improving Your Life Every Day     DB/RC 65690
14 hours 58 minutes
by Joel Osteen
read by Bill Wallace
Pastor of Houston’s Lakewood Church and author of Your Best Life Now (RC 59330) offers advice on applying biblical principles to make positive changes in one’s life. Advocates becoming more self-confident and developing better relationships and habits. Includes examples of transformation from his ministry. Bestseller. 2007.

Being Well When We’re Ill: Wholeness and Hope in Spite of Infirmity     DB/RC 66901
8 hours 43 minutes
by Marva J. Dawn
read by Annie Wauters
Theologian with multiple disabilities offers advice on attaining emotional, intellectual, and spiritual wholeness despite physical infirmities. Suggests scripture to deal with the sorrows of loneliness, pain, worry, boredom, depression, and dying and provides practical ideas for persevering in the face of severe or chronic illness. 2008.

The Best American Spiritual Writing, 2007    RC 65376
13 hours 33 minutes
edited by Philip Zaleski
read by John Lescault
Thirty-five short stories, essays, and poems by Joseph Epstein, Adam Gopnik, Mary Gordon, Pico Iyer, George Packer, Marilynne Robinson, John Updike, Garry Wills, and others. In “The Ends of Science” Eric Cohen ponders the dueling realms of science and religion and examines technology’s limits in satisfying humanity’s deepest longings. 2007.

Chicken Soup for the Soul: Children with Special Needs; Stories of Love and Understanding for Those Who Care for Children with Disabilities     DB/RC 68830
12 hours 43 minutes
by Jack Canfield and others
read by Alice Rosengard
Comforting accounts of rearing children who have autism, juvenile diabetes, Down syndrome, or other mental and physical disabilities by parents, relatives, and caregivers. Contributors share their challenges, setbacks, and successes as they discuss such topics as adjustment, gratitude, milestones, community, sibling rivalry, early learning, breaking barriers, and fostering independence. 2007.

A Civilization of Love: What Every Catholic Can Do to Transform the World    RC 66661
7 hours 37 minutes
by Carl Anderson
read by Bob Moore
The head of the Knights of Columbus, a Catholic fraternal organization, discusses the goals of the late Pope John Paul II and his successor Benedict XVI. Anderson uses their ideas to encourage citizens to embrace a world of love and to live in peace and happiness. Bestseller. 2008.

Happier than God: Turn Ordinary Life into an Extraordinary Experience     DB/RC 66565
4 hours 24 minutes
by Neale Donald Walsch
read by Bill Wallace
Author of the Conversations with God series (RC 44643, RC 44644, RC 47255) offers his formula for lasting happiness, which he calls the Process of Personal Creation. Discusses the principles of this formula, designed to make experiences with God “more present, . . . relevant, and . . . real” using the energy of attraction. 2008.

The Last Lecture     DB/RC 66601
5 hours 6 minutes
by Randy Pausch
read by John Polk
Carnegie Mellon computer professor Pausch provides personal lessons and stories for his young children to learn from as they go through life. Continues the message of his widely circulated taped lecture on achieving childhood dreams that he delivered after he learned he was dying of pancreatic cancer. Bestseller. 2008.

A Lifetime of Wisdom: Embracing the Way God Heals You     DB/RC 68513
8 hours 24 minutes
by Joni Eareckson Tada
read by Mitzi Friedlander
The founder of a Christian disability advocacy organization, herself quadriplegic, uses biblical scripture to explain the contradictions between misfortune and God’s goodness. Describes her response to her own teenage accident and her state of mind forty years later. Advocates living in the “now” and discusses reasons for suffering. 2009.

The Purpose of Christmas     DB/RC 67520
1 hour 55 minutes
by Rick Warren
read by Bill Wallace
Rick Warren, pastor of California’s Saddleback Church and author of The Purpose-Driven Life (RC 55648), uses biblical scripture to examine the origins of Christmas. Describes the holiday as a time of celebration, salvation, and reconciliation for all people. Bestseller. 2008.

What Now?     DB/RC 66826
0 hours 49 minutes
by Ann Patchett
read by Erin Jones
Author of Bel Canto (RC 54190) reflects on life choices in a 2006 commencement address she delivered at Sarah Lawrence College. Draws on her own experiences and offers inspiration to anyone at a crossroads, be it a milestone or an everyday decision. Bestseller. 2008.

Winning the Disability Challenge: A Practical Guide to Successful Living     DB/RC 66824
6 hours 54 minutes
by John F. Tholen
read by Gary Tipton
Psychologist presents strategies and solutions to help disabled individuals adjust psychologically and emotionally after becoming occupationally impaired. Uses success stories from his clients to illustrate that accomplishments and enjoyment of life can continue. Offers positive affirmations, relationship suggestions, and practical information on government benefits. 2008.

Journalism and the Media

Audition: A Memoir    RC 66696
25 hours 19 minutes
by Barbara Walters
read by Annie Wauters
Television journalist Walters discusses her personal life. Covers her adopted daughter, her marriages and affairs, and her sister’s mental disability. Walters also details her professional career and memorable people she has interviewed, including politicians, celebrities, and Robert and Michelle Smithdas—married teachers who are both deaf-blind. Bestseller. 2008.

A Bold, Fresh Piece of Humanity     DB/RC 67658
8 hours 38 minutes
by Bill O’Reilly
read by Roy Avers
Emmy Award-winning television commentator’s autobiography, its title inspired by his third-grade teacher, a nun, who summed him up with the phrase. O’Reilly reminisces about his postwar working-class upbringing in Long Island, a Catholic-school education, his two years as a teacher, and the start of his journalism career in 1970s Boston. Bestseller. 2008.

The Mighty Queens of Freeville: A Mother, a Daughter, and the Town That Raised Them     DB 68652
5 hours 45 minutes
by Amy Dickinson
read by Mary Kane
Nationally syndicated advice columnist “Ask Amy,” whose motto is “I make the mistakes so you don’t have to,” describes her adventures as a single mom raising a daughter and building a career. Contrasts her small hometown and close-knit family upbringing with her experiences in Washington, D.C., and Chicago. 2009.

The Place to Be: Washington, CBS, and the Glory Days of Television News     DB/RC 67270
14 hours 6 minutes
by Roger Mudd
read by Jake Williams
Award-winning television news anchor recalls working at CBS in the 1960s and 1970s and includes interviews with former colleagues. Describes breaking the news of the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, and Watergate. Details his split with the network after being passed over to replace Walter Cronkite in 1980. 2008.

A Slobbering Love Affair: The True (and Pathetic) Story of the Torrid Romance between Barack Obama and the Mainstream Media     DB/RC 68512
3 hours 51 minutes
by Bernard Goldberg
read by Jack Fox
Author of Bias (RC 53649) posits that the mainstream media offered only one-sided coverage of Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign for U.S. president. Argues that the loss of objective journalism as the traditional government watchdog would endanger a free society. Bestseller. 2009.

Language

Grammar Girl’s Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing     DB/RC 67697
6 hours 37 minutes
by Mignon Fogarty
read by Erin Jones
Fogarty presents language usage tips similar to those from her popular podcast Grammar Girl. Explains guidelines for choosing between terms she calls “dirty words” such as “affect” versus “effect” or “i.e.” versus “e.g.” Provides information on applying basic grammar rules, starting sentences properly, and using punctuation and capitalization correctly. 2008.

One Hundred Science Words Every College Graduate Should Know     DB/RC 67354
3 hours 38 minutes
by American Heritage Dictionaries
read by Mark Ashby
Detailed explanations of vocabulary from the fields of astronomy, biology, ecology, physics, and other areas of science and technology. Discusses terms such as absolute zero, big bang, fission, nanotube, prion, quantum mechanics, universal time, xerophyte, and more. Includes a pronunciation guide, etymologies, and supplementary notes on fundamental concepts. 2006.

Snark: A Polemic in Seven Fits     DB 68653
4 hours 4 minutes
by David Denby
read by Michael Scherer
Author of Great Books (RC 44541) examines the pervasive use of abusive, sarcastic speech known as “snark,” a term fusing “snide” and “remark.” Provides a history of snark, discusses standard techniques—such as attacking without reason and appealing to prejudices—and ponders its detrimental effect on journalistic culture and public discourse. 2009.

Legal Issues

Civil Liberties and War    RC 64516
5 hours 29 minutes
edited by Jamuna Carroll
read by Gabra Zackman
Traces the American history of restricting rights during wartime. Discusses Supreme Court cases involving suppressing speech during World War I, internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, the New York Times’s publication of the Pentagon Papers in 1971, and the due-process issue for enemy combatants in 2004. For senior high and older readers. 2006.

Little Pink House: A True Story of Defiance and Courage     DB 68447
12 hours 45 minutes
by Jeff Benedict
read by Mary Kane
Background of the 2005 Supreme Court case Kelo v. City of New London, in which Susette Kelo sued the Connecticut town, challenging the government’s seizure of private property for public use. Discusses the New London development corporation’s plan to build a headquarters for the pharmaceutical company Pfizer. 2009.

The Making of a Civil Rights Lawyer    RC 66414
13 hours 19 minutes
by Michael Meltsner
read by Peter Johnson

Memoir of a white Yale Law School graduate who worked for the NAACP under Thurgood Marshall and Jack Greenberg. Describes supporting Muhammad Ali’s draft resistance, defending death row inmates, and seeking an end to Jim Crow laws. Discusses using the law to advance the civil rights movement. 2006.

Literature

American Bloomsbury: Louisa May Alcott, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Henry David Thoreau; Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Work     DB/RC 66338
8 hours 37 minutes
by Susan Cheever
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Novelist explores the relationships among five writers of the transcendentalist movement who clustered around the home of wealthy Ralph Waldo Emerson in Concord, Massachusetts, from 1840 to 1868. Highlights their intertwined families and the love affairs that contributed to the creation of their literary masterpieces. 2006.

Best African American Essays: 2009     DB 68449
11 hours 22 minutes
edited by Gerald Early and Debra J. Dickerson
read by Bob Moore
Essays explore the African American experience. Topics include family, sports, the arts, technology, education, politics, and homosexuality. In “Fired” Emily Bernard ponders a friendship’s inexplicable end. Also features Brian Palmer’s “Last Thoughts of an Iraq ‘Embed’” and works by Jamaica Kincaid, Walter Mosley, and Barack Obama. Some strong language. 2009.

The Best American Essays, 2007    RC 65608
17 hours 3 minutes
edited by David Foster Wallace
read by Barbara Rappaport
Twenty-two wide-ranging essays selected for their craft and factual integrity. Poet Molly Peacock pays tribute to an eighteenth-century female artist. Novelist Marilynne Robinson examines holiness in modern Christianity. Philosopher Peter Singer argues for philanthropy. Biologist Edward O. Wilson attempts to find common ground with the evangelical community. 2007.

Books: A Memoir     DB/RC 67371
5 hours 41 minutes
by Larry McMurtry
read by Robert Sams
Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Lonesome Dove (RC 22959) writes about his passion for books—as a reader, author, and bookstore owner. Recounts anecdotes involving amazing people he has met, makes observations about authors he has known, and comments on literary works. 2008.

The Buried Book: The Loss and Rediscovery of the Great Epic of Gilgamesh    RC 65710
9 hours 57 minutes
by David Damrosch
read by Lewis Grenville
Chronicles the history of The Epic of Gilgamesh (RC 19137), a three-thousand-year-old Mesopotamian tale recorded on clay tablets believed to have been lost in the seventh century B.C.E. Describes the text’s origins, loss, 1840 excavation, and decoding. Provides detailed analysis of the poem and discusses its impact on modern literature. 2006.

Classics for Pleasure     DB/RC 66597
12 hours 21 minutes
by Michael Dirda
read by Gordon Gould
Pulitzer Prize-winning book critic introduces roughly ninety literary authors and recommends some of his favorite works of fantasy, science fiction, horror, adventure, biography, history, and poetry. Includes essays on writers Ovid, Petronius, Agatha Christie, and Philip K. Dick and on Arthurian romances and H. Rider Haggard’s She. 2007.

Due Considerations: Essays and Criticism     DB/RC 66929
35 hours 57 minutes
by John Updike
read by Ted Stoddard
Reviews, speeches, book introductions, columns, and autobiographical pieces by American novelist, literary critic, and longtime contributor to the New Yorker John Updike. Provides insights and commentary on contemporary American and English authors, religion, the sexual revolution, and other topics. 2007.

Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father     DB/RC 66716
19 hours 24 minutes
by John Matteson
read by Don Hagen
Portrait of nineteenth-century Little Women (RC 58830) author and her father, Bronson Alcott, a noted New England educator and friend of transcendentalists Emerson, Thoreau, and Hawthorne. Describes the influence of Bronson’s penury and emotional fragility on Louisa, who assisted the family financially despite her Civil War-contracted illness. Pulitzer Prize. 2007.

Letter to My Daughter     DB/RC 67662
2 hours 27 minutes
by Maya Angelou
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Author of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (RC 57200) shares life lessons in the form of reminiscences, poems, and short essays with her thousands of young daughters all over the world. In “Senegal” Angelou commits a social faux pas that her hostess graciously ignores. Bestseller. 2008.

The Opposite of Fate: Memories of a Writing Life     DB/RC 67944
11 hours 25 minutes
by Amy Tan
read by Gabriella Cavallero
Autobiographical musings by the author of The Joy Luck Club (RC 29021). One entry describes Tan’s escape from dangerous mud slides near Lake Tahoe. Another details frightening symptoms she endured for years without satisfactory medical explanation—and the eventual diagnosis of persistent neurological Lyme disease. Some strong language. 2003.

The Original Knickerbocker: The Life of Washington Irving     DB/RC 67601
18 hours 18 minutes
by Andrew Burstein
read by Annie Wauters
The author of The Passions of Andrew Jackson (RC 57910) pens a biography of writer Washington Irving (1783– 1859), placing him in the context of his social and political milieu. Details Irving’s family history and his rise to prominence with the publication of Knickerbocker’s History of New York (RC 30658). 2007.

Other Colors: Essays and a Story     DB/RC 66069
17 hours 2 minutes
by Orhan Pamuk
read by Ken Kliban
A collection of autobiographical writings by the Turkish Nobel Prize-winning author of Snow (RC 58863) and My Name Is Red (RC 62910). Discusses Istanbul, his private life, favorite books and authors, natural disasters, and European politics, among other topics. Contains his Nobel lecture “My Father’s Suitcase.” 2007.

Searching for Schindler: A Memoir     DB/RC 68817
8 hours 7 minutes
by Thomas Keneally
read by Gordon Gould
Author of Schindler’s List (RC 20835) describes his novel-writing process. Recalls his 1980 chance encounter with Holocaust survivor Leopold Pfefferberg in Beverly Hills, which led to Keneally’s writing about Oskar Schindler, a Nazi who saved hundreds of Jews from death camps. Some strong language. 2007.

Soldier’s Heart: Reading Literature through Peace and War at West Point    RC 65746
12 hours 50 minutes
by Elizabeth D. Samet
read by Kate Kiley
Civilian English professor at the United States Military Academy at West Point reflects on the role of literature and film in the lives of her cadets and their fellow soldiers. Considers the war in Iraq and the gap between romantic portrayals of war and the harsh realities of battle. 2007.

A Step from Death: A Memoir     DB/RC 67595
8 hours 28 minutes
by Larry Woiwode
read by Ted Stoddard
Addressing his beloved son Joseph, sixty-three-year-old award-winning novelist Woiwode relates his near-fatal encounter with heavy baling ranch equipment and the memories the experience unleashed—from his days as a young writer in bustling New York City to his years as a husband, father, and author living in rural North Dakota. 2008.

A Summer of Hummingbirds: Love, Art, and Scandal in the Intersecting Worlds of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Martin Johnson Heade     DB/RC 68387
9 hours 35 minutes
by Christopher Benfey
read by Alec Volz
Examines the imagery and symbolism of the hummingbird that captivated four American artists and writers  whose association reached an apex in Amherst, Massachusetts, in the summer of 1882. Explores the themes of nature, religion, and sexuality in each individual’s work. 2008.

The Thurber Album: A Collection of Pieces about People    RC 64558
8 hours 11 minutes
by James Thurber
read by Lindsay Ellison
Sixteen articles by American humorist James Thurber (1894–1961), all but one of which originally appeared in the New Yorker . Thurber offers comic portraits of relatives and friends as well as recollections of his boyhood in Columbus, favorite professors at Ohio State, and cub reporting at the Columbus Dispatch. 1942.

Two Lives: Gertrude and Alice    RC 66529
4 hours 32 minutes
by Janet Malcolm
read by Mary Kane
Literary biography portrays the forty-year relationship between Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) and Alice B. Toklas (1877–1967). Discusses their friendships with writers and artists and the Jewish couple’s living conditions in Paris and in a French village during the Nazi occupation of France. Examines Stein’s writing. 2007.

The W. Somerset Maugham Reader: Novels, Stories, Travel Writing    RC 65162
21 hours 40 minutes
by W. Somerset Maugham
read by Annie Wauters
Contains the novel The Hero (1901); long excerpts from Liza of Lambeth, Mrs. Craddock, The Magician, Of Human Bondage, and The Moon and Sixpence; and selections from The Trembling of a Leaf: Stories of the South Sea Islands, The Land of the Blessed Virgin: Sketches and Impressions in Andalusia, and On a Chinese Screen. 2004.

Waiting for Godot: Tragicomedy in Two Acts (En Attendant Godot)    RC 65314
5 hours 45 minutes
by Samuel Beckett
read by Robert Blumenfeld
Vladimir and Estragon converse while they await the arrival of the mysterious Godot, who sends word that he is coming but never appears. In the original French, published in 1952, with Beckett’s own English translation. 1954.

William Cullen Bryant: Author of America     DB 68030
15 hours 48 minutes
by Gilbert H. Muller
read by Ted Stoddard
Biography of William Cullen Bryant (1794–1878) from his impoverished New England childhood to his prominence as one of America’s foremost poets. Chronicles Bryant’s 1825 arrival in Manhattan as a lawyer and his half century as the politically and socially influential editor of the New-York Evening Post. 2008.

You’ve Got to Read This Book! Fifty-five People Tell the Story of the Book That Changed Their Life    RC 66618
10 hours 0 minutes
by Jack Canfield and Gay Hendricks
read by Jack Fox
Successful entertainers, athletes, business and medical professionals, writers, educators, and others reflect on the one book that profoundly shaped their lives. Musician Kenny Loggins describes finding inspiration in Hermann Hesse’s Siddhartha (RC 52190). Additional contributors include Max Edelman, Lou Holtz, Dave Barry, and Debbie Macomber. 2006.

Back to top

Medicine and Health

American Medical Association Complete Guide to Prevention and Wellness: What You Need to Know about Preventing Illness, Staying Healthy, and Living Longer     DB/RC 67870
20 hours 51 minutes
by American Medical Association staff
read by Lou Harpenau
Discusses the importance of proper nutrition, weight, and exercise. Outlines preventive measures for various health problems and ways to keep specific body parts fit, including the reproductive system. Covers the needs of children and adolescents and issues such as premature aging. 2008.

Beating Lyme: Understanding and Treating This Complex and Often Misdiagnosed Disease     DB/RC 67686
11 hours 44 minutes
by Constance A. Bean
read by Kerry Dukin
A health educator collaborates with a physician to chronicle the history of Lyme disease—which is transmitted by ticks—and to discuss its prevention, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. Bean, who has had the disease, examines controversies over chronic, persisting Lyme disease and describes Lyme’s development into a global health issue. 2008.

The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science     DB/RC 66329
13 hours 38 minutes
by Norman Doidge
read by Gary Tipton
Research psychiatrist explains the medical case studies that illustrate neuroplasticity—the brain’s ability to change its own structure and function. Relates the examples of a gifted woman who compensated for her multiple learning disabilities and of congenitally blind people who learned to perceive objects. Bestseller. 2007.

Can’t Remember What I Forgot: The Good News from the Front Lines of Memory Research     DB/RC 67214
8 hours 58 minutes
by Sue Halpern
read by Faith Potts
Science writer Halpern recounts her three-year investigation into medical research on Alzheimer’s disease and other memory disorders. Describes studies involving food, herbal supplements, and game playing. Reports her findings that age-related memory loss is normal and that regular physical exercise boosts memory recall. 2008.

Demystifying Anorexia Nervosa: An Optimistic Guide to Understanding and Healing     DB/RC 67100
7 hours 28 minutes
by Alexander R.  Lucas
read by Butch Hoover
Former head of child and adolescent psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic offers advice for parents on helping a child overcome this chronic disorder. Discusses causes, warning signs, diagnosis, and treatment options. Emphasizes the importance of the patient’s role in defining the recovery process. Includes case studies and resources. 2008.

Knee Surgery: The Essential Guide to Total Knee Recovery     DB/RC 68259
5 hours 58 minutes
by Daniel Fulham O’Neill
read by Joe Wilson
Renowned knee surgeon and sports psychologist discusses mental and physical effects of knee surgeries such as knee arthroscopy, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, and total knee replacement. Details a three-pronged recovery program including multilevel exercises, movement patterns for work and sports, and aerobic training. Also addresses frequently asked questions. 2008.

Life Disrupted: Getting Real about Chronic Illness in Your Twenties and Thirties     DB/RC 67333
7 hours 55 minutes
by Laurie Edwards
read by Kerry Dukin
The author, a twenty-seven-year-old health journalist with several chronic illnesses, shares her own experiences and those of other young adults who have conditions that are treatable but not curable. Discusses dealing with the medical establishment, the work world, and personal relationships. Offers guidance on managing one’s health care. 2008.

Living with Coronary Heart Disease: A Guide for Patients and Families     DB/RC 67871
8 hours 46 minutes
by Jerome E.  Granato
read by Kerry Dukin
Cardiologist explains the nature of coronary heart disease. Discusses the structure of the heart and the role cholesterol plays in the development of the condition. Highlights symptoms, risk factors, diagnostic tools, medications, and surgical treatments. Suggests lifestyle changes necessary for living with the disease. 2008.

Macular Degeneration: A Complete Guide for Patients and Their Families     DB/RC 67861
5 hours 1 minute
by Michael A. Samuel
read by Carol Dines
Retinal surgeon discusses the causes and diagnoses associated with the wet and dry forms of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Includes guidelines for treatment; suggests nutritional therapy, including sample meals; and presents tips for improving the quality of life while coping with AMD. 2008.

Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present     DB/RC 66297
21 hours 29 minutes
by Harriet A. Washington
read by Bob Moore
Documents the use of African Americans in nonconsensual, nontherapeutic research by private institutions and the federal government. Recounts instances of drug and radiation testing, involuntary sterilization, and surgical experimentation. Cites the mid-twentieth-century Tuskegee Syphilis Study. Examines racial and ethical issues in the medical field. National Book Critics Circle Award. 2006.

The Medical Detectives     DB/RC 67332
15 hours 14 minutes
by Berton Roueché
read by Butch Hoover
Accounts of medical mysteries originally published in the New Yorker between 1947 and 1988. The detectives in these narratives—epidemiologists, public health officers, doctors, and hospital staff members—investigate cases of strange illnesses, rare diseases, poisons, and parasites through a combination of technical knowledge, intuition, and painstaking search for clues. 1988.

Mental Sharpening Stones: Manage the Cognitive Challenges of Multiple Sclerosis     DB/RC 68256
9 hours 37 minutes
by Jeffrey N. Gingold
read by Bill Wallace
People with multiple sclerosis (MS) and health-care professionals describe techniques for coping with the cognitive obstacles of the disease. They offer practical methods for remaining mentally active and include case studies and interviews. 2009.

The Migraine Brain: Your Breakthrough Guide to Fewer Headaches, Better Health     DB/RC 67872
14 hours 56 minutes
by Carolyn Bernstein and Elaine McArdle
read by Kerry Dukin
A neurologist specializing in headaches and a journalist who suffers from migraines discuss the uniqueness of migraineurs’ brains and describe the different types and stages of the condition. They offer advice on finding the right medical care, determining headache triggers, reducing pain, and creating a personal wellness plan. 2008.

MS and Your Feelings: Handling the Ups and Downs of Multiple Sclerosis    RC 64329
7 hours 59 minutes
by Allison Shadday
read by Michele Schaeffer
A psychotherapist with multiple sclerosis (MS), a degenerative disease of the brain and spinal cord, offers suggestions for dealing with everyday emotional challenges. Describes ways the patient—with help from family, friends, and professionals—can fight fatigue, cognitive impairment, and depression and other negative emotions. Includes resources. 2007.

One Hundred Questions and Answers about Breast Cancer     DB/RC 68040
8 hours 54 minutes
by Zora K. Brown and Karl K. Boatman
read by Faith Potts
Boatman, a physician, and Brown, an advocate for women’s and minorities’ health issues, present facts about prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of breast cancer. They discuss basic anatomy; risk factors and prevention; and emotional, sexual, and fertility aspects of the disease. 2008.

One Hundred Questions and Answers about Cervical Cancer     DB/RC 68199
4 hours 40 minutes
by Don S. Dizon and others
read by Carol Dines
Physicians answer basic questions concerning cervical cancer. They cover risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, sexuality, fertility, and stages of the disease. They also offer advice on prevention and screening, including Pap tests and vaccines. 2009.

One Hundred Questions and Answers about HIV and AIDS     DB/RC 68064
8 hours 34 minutes
by Joel Gallant
read by Alice Rosengard
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine physician offers information about living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Covers topics such as disease basics, transmission, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment options, and side effects. Also addresses women’s issues (including pregnancy), relationships, and the prognosis for HIV/AIDS patients. 2009.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause    RC 66354
16 hours 32 minutes
by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective
read by Kerry Dukin
Describes the process of menopause for women and covers health-care options for its symptoms. Includes medical and alternative treatments such as stress management, diet, and exercise. Discusses scientific research studies and encourages women to focus on making good personal health-care decisions. Highlights women’s natural life transitions. 2006.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth    RC 66371
17 hours 57 minutes
by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective
read by Kerry Dukin
Information about all stages of pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. Discusses choosing medical care, planning the birth, and attending to the pregnant woman’s physical and emotional care. Describes special concerns during pregnancy and childbirth and covers the tests that may be involved. Also addresses infant feeding options. 2008.

Regaining Your Self: Breaking Free from the Eating Disorder Identity; a Bold New Approach     DB/RC 67055
6 hours 48 minutes
by Ira M.  Sacker
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Medical specialist discusses the spectrum of eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and compulsive overeating that are accompanied by underlying issues such as perfectionism and depression. Describes his method of treating a patient’s mind, body, and soul by using personal interactive rational therapy (PIRT). Offers treatment options and resources. 2007.

The Spectrum: A Scientifically Proven Program to Feel Better, Live Longer, Lose Weight, and Gain Health     DB/RC 67814
14 hours 35 minutes
by Dean Ornish
read by Butch Hoover
Dr. Ornish, known for his lifestyle program for reversing heart disease, details a broader range of methods for eating, exercising, and managing stress to achieve health. He discusses choosing from a spectrum of options for losing weight, lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, and preventing diabetes and cancers. Includes recipes. 2007.

Treating the Aching Heart: A Guide to Depression, Stress, and Heart DiseaseRC 65124
9 hours 43 minutes
by Lawson R. Wulsin
read by Gregory Gorton
Psychiatrist describes ways depression, anxiety, and stress contribute to heart disease and vice versa. Uses research and case studies to explain the interaction of the disorders. Examines the heart-brain connection, family history, warning signs, treatments, and tips for better care. Advises integration of mental-health and primary care. 2007.

Trick or Treatment: The Undeniable Facts about Alternative Medicine     DB/RC 67824
13 hours 18 minutes
by Simon Singh and Edzard Ernst
read by Butch Hoover
A science journalist and a professor of complementary medicine examine the history of acupuncture, homeopathy, chiropractic, herbal medicine, and other alternative treatments. They describe the principles of evidence-based medicine, including clinical trials; the placebo effect; and ethical considerations. 2008.

What Helped Get Me Through: Cancer Survivors Share Wisdom and Hope     DB/RC 68039
11 hours 37 minutes
edited by Julie K. Silver
read by Mary Kane
Breast cancer survivor and medical doctor uses her experience and the comments of other cancer survivors and specialists to explore aspects of fighting the disease. Discusses the need for adequate sleep, proper nutrition, and exercise. Covers spirituality, intimacy, and the importance of seeking help and balancing work and family. 2008.

What You Don’t Know Can Kill You: A Physician’s Radical Guide to Conquering the Obstacles to Excellent Medical Care    RC 65054
5 hours 9 minutes
by Laura Nathanson
read by Barbara Pinolini
Pediatrician whose husband died after misdiagnosis advises patients to obtain all their medical records, read pathology reports, and question physicians. Includes definitions of medical jargon, highlights “fuzzy logic” used by doctors, and advocates getting second opinions and having biopsies. Re commends having a designated “sentinel” —or medical guardian—to oversee treatment. 2007.

Why People Get Sick: Exploring the Mind-Body Connection     DB/RC 67395
10 hours 12 minutes
by Darian Leader and David Corfield
read by Kristin Allison
A psychoanalyst and a cybernetics researcher collaborate to examine illness as affected by the state of a person’s mind. They use numerous case studies to illustrate ways emotions contribute to cancer, heart disease, and lowered resistance to infection. Urges doctors to go beyond physical symptoms and consider psychological connections. 2008.

Music

Air Castle of the South: WSM and the Making of Music City     DB/RC 66934
13 hours 58 minutes
by Craig Havighurst
read by Robert Sams
Chronicles the rise of Nashville radio station WSM, established in 1925, which popularized country music including the Grand Ole Opry performances. Discusses the station’s importance to the city. Profiles the businessmen and entertainers who influenced the station’s popularity and protested the 2002 proposed format change. 2007.

Born Country: How Faith, Family, and Music Brought Me Home     DB/RC 68466
7 hours 34 minutes
by Randy Owen
read by Bob Moore
Randy Owen, lead singer for the award-winning country-and-western band Alabama, provides an autobiographical account of his life. Owen describes his family’s southern heritage, the band’s rise to fame and fortune in the 1980s, and the faith and values that have sustained him personally and in his career. 2008.

Can’t Buy Me Love: The Beatles, Britain, and America     DB/RC 66593
31 hours 56 minutes
by Jonathan Gould
read by George Holmes
Biography of the Beatles includes social commentary and musical and lyrical analysis. Explains the revolutionary effect the band had on the 1960s music industry and popular culture. Examines the group’s transformation into an international phenomenon and discusses the 1980 murder of John Lennon that dashed reunion hopes. 2007.

Delta Blues: The Life and Times of the Mississippi Masters Who Revolutionized American Music     DB 68628
18 hours 52 minutes
by Ted Gioia
read by Bob Moore
The author of The History of Jazz (RC 46401) depicts the history of the African American musical form known as the blues, chronicling its birth in the Mississippi Delta and migration to Chicago. Highlights the influence of Muddy Waters, John Lee Hooker, B.B. King, and other contributors. 2008.

Dr. Dre: The Biography    RC 66387
11 hours 36 minutes
by Ronin Ro
read by Bill Quinn
Music journalist traces the rise of Andre Young, a.k.a. Dr. Dre, from Compton, California, who in 1989 created one of the first “gangsta” rap albums. Details the development of the genre. Discusses the East Coast–West Coast feud and the gangland-style murders of rival rappers. Strong language and some violence. 2007.

Johann Sebastian Bach: Life and Work    RC 63944
29 hours 58 minutes
by Martin Geck
read by Dennis Rooney
German professor of musicology examines the career and music of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750). Highlights the composer’s family life and connections to the aristocracy and the Protestant church. Describes Bach’s compositional technique, his music as a reflection of his faith, and the recognition he received. 2000.

The Librettist of Venice: The Remarkable Life of Lorenzo Da Ponte—Mozart’s Poet, Casanova’s Friend, and Italian Opera’s Impresario in America     DB/RC 67265
16 hours 15 minutes
by Rodney Bolt
read by Frank Coffee
Chronicles the life and career of Italian Lorenzo Da Ponte (1749–1838), from priest to poet and librettist. Covers Da Ponte’s working relationship with Mozart, immigration to America in 1805, and role in establishing the first New York City opera house. 2006.

Life with My Sister Madonna     DB/RC 67297
11 hours 14 minutes
by Christopher Ciccone
read by Alec Volz
A gay younger brother relates his view of the superstar singer. Ciccone describes growing up with Madonna and their six siblings, secretly taking ballet lessons with her, working and touring with her for twenty years, and dealing with their estrangement after her marriage to Guy Ritchie. Strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

The Lost Supreme: The Life of Dreamgirl Florence Ballard     DB/RC 67456
7 hours 4 minutes
by Peter Benjaminson
read by Mare Trevathan
Biography of Flo Ballard, based on taped interviews with Ballard herself. Describes her singing as a teenager with Diana Ross and Mary Wilson, the trio’s evolution into the Supremes, and Ballard’s later expulsion. Discusses her attempts to get royalties and her death in 1976 at age thirty-two. 2008.

Moondog: The Viking of Sixth Avenue; the Authorized Biography     DB/RC 67495
12 hours 55 minutes
by Robert Scotto
read by Jim Zeiger
Biography of musician Moondog, Louis Thomas Hardin Jr. (1916–1999), who was blinded at age sixteen. Discusses his rise from being a Viking-garbed, homeless street musician in New York City in the 1960s to becoming a Columbia Records pop-music sensation and master composer for European orchestras. 2007.

Music Is My Mistress     DB/RC 66574
17 hours 54 minutes
by Edward Kennedy Ellington
read by Peter Jay Fernandez
Autobiography of bandleader, composer, and jazz musician Duke Ellington (1899–1974). Describes Ellington’s childhood in Washington, D.C., his fellow artists, his 1923 arrival in New York City, subsequent worldwide tours, and his philosophy of life. 1973.

Music Lessons: Guide Your Child to Play a Musical Instrument (and Enjoy It!)     DB/RC 67895
7 hours 16 minutes
by Stephanie Stein Crease
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Deploring the lack of musical education in American public schools, the author encourages parents to initiate and continue nurturing their children’s musical knowledge. Offers practical advice from music educators, parents, and youths on choosing instruments, programs, and instructors best suited to each child. 2006.

The Rest Is Noise: Listening to the Twentieth Century     DB/RC 66411
29 hours 5 minutes
by Alex Ross
read by Lewis Grenville
Music critic for the New Yorker examines the history of the twentieth century through its music during three time periods: 1900 to 1933, 1933 to 1945, and 1945 to 2000. Discusses the composers, the gulf between classical and popular music, and the musical works that defined each era. National Book Critics Circle Award. 2007.

Sing Me Back Home: Love, Death, and Country Music     DB/RC 68110
9 hours 28 minutes
by Dana Jennings
read by Jeremy Gage
New York Times editor explains the ways the classic country music of the 1950s to 1970s resonated with the rural, working-class lives of his New Hampshire family and neighbors. Discusses legendary musicians like Johnny Cash, Hank Williams, Patsy Cline, and Loretta Lynn and their effect on audiences. Strong language. 2008.

This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession    RC 65609
12 hours 24 minutes
by Daniel J. Levitin
read by John Lescault
Neuroscientist and musician investigates the role of music in human evolution and daily life. Examines the science of music from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience. Discusses how the brain processes music, details studies on musical meaning and pleasure, and offers insights into personal perceptions and preferences. 2006.

The Way I Am     DB/RC 67868
3 hours 21 minutes
by Eminem
read by Alec Volz
Autobiography of the controversial rapper. Detroit native Eminem, born Marshall B. Mathers III, describes his private life and the development of his Grammy Award-winning hip-hop career. Discusses the lyrics of his greatest hits, the Oscar-winning movie based on his life, and his work as a record producer. Strong language. 2008.

Willie Nelson: An Epic Life    RC 66762
23 hours 38 minutes
by Joe Nick Patoski
read by Jake Williams
Biography of Willie Nelson (born 1933), a country-and-western singer/ songwriter from Texas, who began writing and performing songs as a child. Chronicles Nelson’s career and first success in 1961 when Patsy Cline sang his song “Crazy.” Discusses his colleagues, marriages, and social causes. Some strong language. 2008.

World Musics in Context: A Comprehensive Survey of the World’s Major Musical Cultures    RC 65186
28 hours 48 minutes
by Peter Fletcher
read by Annie Wauters
Ethnomusicologist’s wide-ranging survey of music’s role in the development of civilizations and its importance in culture, society, religion, and history. Examines various musical traditions of Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas from antiquity through modern times. Discusses the interplay of style and function. Foreword by Laurence Picken. 2001.

Nature and the Environment

The Bafut Beagles     DB/RC 65833
6 hours 44 minutes
by Gerald Durrell
read by David Cutler
British explorer and naturalist recalls his 1949 travels in the Cameroons, West Africa, where he mounted an expedition to collect animals and specimens. Relates the generosity of his host, the Fon of Bafut, who ensured his people’s cooperation, and the supply of local beasts that far exceeded Durrell’s expectations. 1954.

The Devil’s Teeth: A True Story of Obsession and Survival among America’s Great White Sharks     DB/RC 67002
11 hours 11 minutes
by Susan Casey
read by Martha Harmon Pardee
Account of the author’s journey to the Farallon Islands, a renowned refuge of great white sharks twenty-seven miles from San Francisco. Casey, an editor, relates joining scientists Peter Pyle and Scot Anderson as they study the predators in their natural habitat. She describes shark attacks and the archipelago’s beauty. Some strong language. 2005.

The Ends of the Earth: An Anthology of the Finest Writing on the Arctic and the Antarctic     DB/RC 66582
17 hours 35 minutes
edited by Elizabeth Kolbert and Francis Spufford
read by John Horton
Fiction and nonfiction selections by scientists, explorers, and novelists spanning the twentieth century. Includes excerpts from journals of Antarctic explorers Ernest Shackleton, Roald Amundsen, and Robert Falcon Scott. Arctic contributions feature Robert Peary’s disputed account of reaching the North Pole and a native legend, “Kasiagsak, the Great Liar.” 2007.

A Land of Ghosts: The Braided Lives of People and the Forest of Far Western Amazonia      DB/RC 67349
8 hours 33 minutes
by David G. Campbell
read by Mark Ashby
Botanist and author of The Crystal Desert: Summer in Antarctica (RC 36818) describes his sojourns into western Brazil’s Amazon river valley to survey the region’s biodiversity. Reflects on rainforest inhabitants—scientists, colonists, mixed-heritage Caboclos, and in particular, Native Americans, who are experiencing the loss of culture and homeland. 2005.

Lands: Taming the Wilds    RC 66299
7 hours 20 minutes
by Julie Kerr Casper
read by Michael Scherer
Presents key issues in the management of Earth’s natural landscapes. Explores human impact on deserts, mountains, forests, wetlands, coastlines, and arctic regions. Discusses resources, the concept of sustainability, and the importance of individual conservation efforts such as reducing, reusing, and recycling. For junior and senior high readers. 2007.

The Last Flight of the Scarlet Macaw: One Woman’s Fight to Save the World’s Most Beautiful Bird     DB/RC 67335
11 hours 25 minutes
by Bruce Barcott
read by Jack Fox
Chronicles the crusade of Sharon Matola, an expatriate American who directs the Belize Zoo, to stop construction of a dam that would flood the nesting grounds of the country’s last scarlet macaws. Illuminates the economic struggles of developing nations and the conflict between environmental conservation and industrial development. 2008.

The Log from the Sea of Cortez     DB 68309
12 hours 54 minutes
by John Steinbeck
read by Robert Sams
This narrative account of John Steinbeck’s 1940 expedition to the Gulf of California with his friend, biologist Ed Ricketts, describes their four-thousand-mile journey—from  chartering a sea vessel to collecting specimens—combining adventure, science, and philosophy. Includes a 1951 appendix “About Ed Ricketts.” 1941.

Of a Feather: A Brief History of American Birding     DB/RC 65791
11 hours 41 minutes
by Scott Weidensaul
read by Bill Wallace
Living on the Wind (RC 62048) author surveys American birding from colonial times to the twenty-first century. Examines contributions of early naturalist William Bartram, ornithologist Alexander Wilson, artist John James Audubon, and field-guide author Roger Tory Peterson. Discusses the impact of conservationism and technology on birding. 2007.

Plants: Life from the Earth    RC 66310
6 hours 10 minutes
by Julie Kerr Casper
read by Michael Scherer
Presents key issues in preserving plants. Discusses the evolution and life cycles of plants, their role in biodiversity, and their importance to humans. Describes threats from disease, pollution, and poor land management. Suggests ways readers can become “backyard conservationists.” For junior and senior high readers. 2007.

The Superorganism: The Beauty, Elegance, and Strangeness of  Insect Societies     DB 68328
16 hours 37 minutes
by Bert Hölldobler and Edward O. Wilson
read by Mark Ashby
Pulitzer Prize-winning biologists and authors of Journey to the Ants (RC 40360) trace the evolution of insect superorganisms—colonies of individuals living in societies marked by altruistic cooperation, complex communication, and division of labor. They describe construction, organization, life cycles, and inner workings of ant, bee, wasp, and termite communities. 2009.

The Unnatural History of the Sea     DB/RC 67600
16 hours 20 minutes
by Callum Roberts
read by Ted Stoddard
Professor traces the history of commercial and sport fishing and the decline of once-abundant ocean species. Draws on firsthand accounts of early sailors as well as catch records to document the collapse of stocks of fish like Atlantic cod. Calls for increased regulation and the establishment of marine reserves. 2007.

Philosophy

The Courtier and the Heretic: Leibniz, Spinoza, and the Fate of God in the Modern World    RC 64820
13 hours 46 minutes
by Matthew Stewart
read by Gordon Gould
Examines the debate over the nature of God conducted by rationalist philosophers Baruch de Spinoza (1632–1677) —who conceived a noninterfering God—and Gottfried Leibniz (1646– 1716)—who saw God as omnipotent and involved. Discusses their differences concerning free will, their 1676 meeting in The Hague, and the debt Leibniz’s thought owes to Spinoza. 2006.

Nothing to Be Frightened Of     DB 68481
9 hours 29 minutes
by Julian Barnes
read by David Cutler
British novelist and self-declared agnostic muses on mortality. Stating that this book is not an autobiography, Julian Barnes examines his parents’ attitudes about death, as well as those of philosophers, scientists, and writers, and compares them with his own. 2008.

Poetry

American Scream: Allen Ginsberg’s Howl and the Making of the Beat Generation    RC 64050
9 hours 23 minutes
by Jonah Raskin
read by Richard Davidson
Professor examines Ginsberg’s controversial 1956 poem Howl within the cultural context of the Cold War, the atomic bomb, homosexual liberation, and the Beat poetry movement in New York and San Francisco. Discusses Ginsberg’s literary friendships with Kerouac and Burroughs. Some strong language and some descriptions of sex. 2004.

Anna of All the Russias: The Life of Anna Akhmatova     DB/RC 66087
14 hours 0 minutes
by Elaine Feinstein
read by Suzanne Toren
Biographer details the life of poet Anna Akhmatova (1889–1966) against the backdrop of post-Czarist Russia. Discusses Akhmatova’s political activism, her criticism of Soviet oppression, and the brutality she suffered at the hands of the authoritarian regime that banned her poetry and imprisoned her family. 2005.

Posthumous Keats: A Personal Biography     DB/RC 68002
13 hours 59 minutes
by Stanley Plumly
read by Jim Zeiger
Reflective biography of English poet John Keats (1795–1821), structured by themes in his life and art. Plumly posits that Keats’s early, drawn-out, painful terminal illness is inseparable from the power of his poetry and explains why, despite expecting his work to die with him, Keats achieved posthumous poetic immortality. 2008.

Time and Materials: Poems 1997–2005     DB/RC 66784
2 hours 14 minutes
by Robert Hass
read by John Lescault
The former poet laureate presents a collection of poems in a variety of styles on a broad array of contemporary topics. In “State of the Planet” Hass laments our abuse of nature. In “Bush’s War” he deplores the inhumanity of all war. National Book Award. 2007.

Unpacking the Boxes: A Memoir of a Life in Poetry     DB/RC 68474
6 hours 38 minutes
by Donald Hall
read by Gregory Gorton
Former U.S. poet laureate Donald Hall (born 1928) recalls his successes and failures as a son, husband, father, and writer. Shares memories that were released when he unpacked boxes of snapshots and manuscripts saved by his mother. Author of White Apples and the Taste of Stone: Selected Poems, 1946–2006 (RC 64104). 2008.

Psychology and Self-Help

Act like a Lady, Think like a Man: What Men Really Think about  Love, Relationships, Intimacy, and Commitment     DB/RC 68612
5 hours 7 minutes
by Steve Harvey
read by Bob Moore
Host of the Steve Harvey Morning Show draws on his experience fielding questions from women—and men—to describe the male mindset and advise women on ways to use it to their advantage. Covers dealing with mama’s boys and cheating men and introducing the kids to a potential mate. Bestseller. 2009.

Alcoholics Anonymous: The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women Have Recovered from Alcoholism     DB/RC 67094
19 hours 47 minutes
published by Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc.
read by John Polk
Fourth edition of the basic 1939 text of Alcoholics Anonymous, the “big book.” Describes the recovery program and includes personal histories of recovering members. Highlights founder Bill’s story, the self-help group’s twelve traditions, plus medical and religious views of the organization. 2001.

Before You Do: Making Great Decisions That You Won’t Regret     DB/RC 67754
9 hours 6 minutes
by T.D. Jakes
read by Bob Moore
Bishop Jakes, author of Reposition Yourself (RC 65083), offers spiritual and psychological tools to those who need relationship advice. Suggests a practical approach to handling emotional issues involving family, finances, marriage, children, divorce, and other crises. Bestseller. 2008.

Broken Open: How Difficult Times Can Help Us Grow     DB/RC 68282
12 hours 15 minutes
by Elizabeth Lesser
read by Faith Potts
Cofounder of the spiritual retreat Omega Institute uses her personal experiences and those of retreat participants to describe what she calls the Phoenix process. She urges those who are frozen by a difficult relationship, job, or loss to use these low periods to create a new life. Bestseller. 2004.

Buyology: Truth and Lies about Why We Buy     DB/RC 68128
7 hours 52 minutes
by Martin Lindstrom
read by Jim Zeiger
Marketing expert explains “buyology,” his term for the subconscious thoughts, feelings, and desires that drive consumer decisions. Discusses findings from a three-year, multimillion-dollar neuromarketing experiment that gauged responses to products and advertisements and tried to determine the ways sex, religion, subliminal messages, and bodily senses influence purchasing. 2008.

Emotional Sobriety: From Relationship Trauma to Resilience and Balance     DB/RC 67847
10 hours 54 minutes
by Tian Dayton
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Clinical psychologist provides insight on ways individuals who have grown up with the trauma of addiction, abuse, or family dysfunction can gain emotional stability. Uses neurological research and a holistic approach to describe methods that can undo the damage and reverse the negative effects of relationship turmoil. 2007.

Evil Genes: Why Rome Fell, Hitler Rose, Enron Failed, and My Sister Stole My Mother’s Boyfriend     DB/RC 67056
14 hours 6 minutes
by Barbara Oakley
read by Elisabeth Rodgers
Prompted by her sister’s lifelong malevolent behavior, Oakley explores biological roots of deceitful, manipulative, and otherwise Machiavellian traits. Draws on psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience to examine ways people with such personalities function—and often succeed. Case studies include Adolf Hitler, Slobodan Milosevic, Chairman Mao, and Enron leaders. Some strong language. 2007.

Happiness Now! Timeless Wisdom for Feeling Good Fast     DB/RC 67679
8 hours 41 minutes
by Robert Holden
read by Gary Tipton
Psychologist uses case studies from his Stress Busters Clinic to illustrate his formula for achieving loving relationships and self-acceptance. Posits that an individual’s happiness is determined by his or her own perceptions, thoughts, and beliefs. Offers suggestions for loving unconditionally and living well in the present. 2007.

Man’s Search for Meaning      DB/RC 66557
5 hours 33 minutes
by Viktor E. Frankl
read by Bill Wallace
Viennese psychiatrist Viktor Frankl (1905–1997) recounts his experiences as a prisoner in Nazi concentration camps, where he developed his doctrine of logotherapy. Argues that individuals can overcome suffering not through pleasure, but through the discovery and pursuit of meaningful purpose. First published in German in 1946. 2006.

The New Codependency: Help and Guidance for Today’s Generation     DB/RC 68362
10 hours 1 minute
by Melody Beattie
read by Kerry Dukin
A follow-up to the classic Codependent No More (RC 28220) explains that codependency is a pattern of behavior rather than an illness. Using examples from her own life, Beattie discusses analyzing one’s actions and offers enabling techniques to set boundaries and take better care of oneself. 2009.

The Nice Girl Syndrome: Stop Being Manipulated and Abused—and Start Standing Up for Yourself     DB/RC 67216
9 hours 21 minutes
by Beverly Engel
read by Margaret Strom
Domestic-abuse expert advises women to become stronger and take charge of their own lives. Discusses the societal traditions that condition women to be “nice girls” but may set them up to be used and/or abused. Offers suggestions for overcoming negative behaviors and empowering oneself. 2008.

Rapt: Attention and the Focused Life     DB/RC 69369
7 hours 51 minutes
by Winifred Gallagher
read by Laural Merlington
Describes different types and styles of attention. Explores the important cognitive role attentiveness plays in culture, relationships, creativity, work, and health. Tracks the link between neuroscience and psychology and suggests eliminating self-defeating habits and cultivating the ability to become engrossed by the positive. Commercial audiobook. 2009.

Staring at the Sun: Overcoming the Terror of Death     DB/RC 66619
7 hours 20 minutes
by Irvin D. Yalom
read by Gary Tipton
Psychiatrist and author of Love’s Executioner (RC 30621) offers anecdotes and methods, from his personal experience and clinical work, for dealing with anxieties about death. Encourages readers to transcend fear and find fulfillment by confronting one’s own mortality, communicating more deeply with loved ones, and appreciating life’s beauty. 2008.

The Suicide Index: Putting My Father’s Death in Order     DB/RC 68202
8 hours 11 minutes
by Joan Wickersham
read by Erin Jones
In this memoir novelist Joan Wickersham explores her father’s suicide—writing about it to understand her family and trying to transform it into something she can grasp. She explains the facts of the event and ponders the unfathomable. Some strong language. National Book Award finalist. 2008.

The Survivors Club: The Secrets and Science That Could Save Your Life     DB/RC 68508
12 hours 52 minutes
by Ben Sherwood
read by Butch Hoover
Award-winning journalist explores psychological, scientific, and genetic aspects of survival against odds. Describes tactics and strategies that could enable one to live through car accidents, plane crashes, violent crimes, illness, and other life-and-death situations. Analyzes case studies and discusses the interplay of luck, faith, and fear. Bestseller. 2009.

Sway: The Irresistible Pull of Irrational Behavior     DB/RC 67217
5 hours 11 minutes
by Ori Brafman and Rom Brafman
read by Margaret Strom
Organizational expert Ori Brafman and his brother, psychologist Rom Brafman, explore the psychological forces that undermine rational thinking. They use real-life examples to demonstrate that the desire to avoid loss and the inclination to remain committed to initial assessments can influence one’s decision-making process—sometimes with detrimental effects. 2008.

Treating the Aching Heart: A Guide to Depression, Stress, and Heart Disease    RC 65124
9 hours 43 minutes
by Lawson R. Wulsin
read by Gregory Gorton
Psychiatrist describes ways depression, anxiety, and stress contribute to heart disease and vice versa. Uses research and case studies to explain the interaction of the disorders. Examines the heart-brain connection, family history, warning signs, treatments, and tips for better care. Advises integration of mental-health and primary care. 2007.

Religion

Bad Girls of the Bible: And What We Can Learn from Them     DB/RC 67302
11 hours 15 minutes
by Liz Curtis Higgs
read by Kerry Dukin
Fictional retelling of the stories of ten biblical women, followed by commentary on the lessons to be learned from each character. Defines the author’s notion of “badness” and features Eve, Rahab, Delilah, Lot’s wife, Jezebel, Potiphar’s wife, Sapphira, Michal, the Woman at the Well, and the Sinful Woman. 1999.

The Bible: A Biography     DB/RC 65836
7 hours 28 minutes
by Karen Armstrong
read by Mary Kane
Religious historian examines the transformation of the Bible’s two testaments from oral history to written scripture. Explains changes in biblical interpretation by Christian and Jewish religious leaders and discusses the challenges to the Bible’s accuracy in the scientific age. 2007.

Called out of Darkness: A Spiritual Confession     DB/RC 68423
7 hours 5 minutes
by Anne Rice
read by Elisabeth Rodgers
Spiritual memoir by the author of Interview with the Vampire (RC 61222). Rice recounts her devout Catholic upbringing in New Orleans, her liberal education in college at Berkeley, and her subsequent struggle with religious doubt. Describes finally finding, after thirty-eight years of atheism, a renewed faith in God. 2008.

End of Days: Predictions and Prophecies about the End of the World     DB/RC 67325
8 hours 15 minutes
by Sylvia Browne
read by Erin Jones
Psychic and author of Prophecy: What the Future Holds for You (RC 58676) examines doomsday beliefs of ancient cultures including the Maya and of modern religions such as Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Predicts how—and when—the world will end for humans and urges better stewardship of the planet. 2008.

God’s Problem: How the Bible Fails to Answer Our Most Important Question—Why We Suffer     DB/RC 66463
10 hours 49 minutes
by Bart D. Ehrman
read by Bill Wallace
Former minister and author of Misquoting Jesus (RC 61941) examines the Old and New Testaments for answers to the problem of suffering in the world. Ehrman finds the Bible offers different viewpoints—suffering as punishment, as a redemptive process, and as a test of faith—and analyzes the answers. Some violence. 2008.

The Great Awakening: Reviving Faith and Politics in a Post-Religious Right America     RC 66638
13 hours 12 minutes
by Jim Wallis
read by Butch Hoover
Author of God’s Politics (RC 59930) asserts that change is in the air in America. Urges faith communities to use politics for the common good and to fight poverty, social injustice, environmental woes, disease, violence, and other problems threatening humankind. Presents accounts of people who are making a difference. 2008.

Head and Heart: American Christianities     DB/RC 67304
18 hours 48 minutes
by Garry Wills
read by Lou Harpenau
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian surveys the key movements and personalities that shaped religion in America from colonial times to the twenty-first century. Argues that two schools of thought—evangelicalism and enlightenment—have influenced society. Posits that the separation of church and state has benefited religion, as Madison and Jefferson predicted it would. 2007.

The Holy Vote: The Politics of Faith in America    RC 64357
11 hours 40 minutes
by Ray Suarez
read by Peter Berkrot
A Christian reporter examines what he terms the “religionization” of politics and the “politicization” of religion in the United States. Discusses gay marriage, school prayer, sex education, abortion, changes in the Catholic Church, and the influence of a growing Latino Catholic population, among other issues. 2006.

How to Be a Christian in a Brave New World     DB/RC 66581
8 hours 10 minutes
by Joni Eareckson Tada and Nigel M. de S. Cameron
read by Susan McInerney
Bioethics research professor Cameron and Tada, the quadriplegic founder of a Christian disability advocacy organization and author of When God Weeps (RC 49793), offer Christian perspectives on biotechnology issues. They discuss the moral and ethical debates surrounding cloning, genetic engineering, in vitro fertilization, stem-cell research, and other developments. 2006

Jesus, Interrupted: Revealing the Hidden Contradictions in the Bible (and Why We Don’t Know about Them)     DB/RC 68810
11 hours 32 minutes
by Bart D. Ehrman
read by Dennis Rooney
In this companion to Misquoting Jesus (RC 61941), biblical historian Ehrman reveals the divergent views of scholars concerning the true nature of Jesus and the concept of salvation. Discusses the historical Jesus, the writers of the Bible, and the origins of Christianity. Bestseller. 2009.

The Jewish Americans: Three Centuries of Jewish Voices in America     DB/RC 66398
14 hours 21 minutes
by Beth S. Wenger
read by Suzanne Toren
Companion piece to a 2008 PBS television series uses first-person accounts to examine the history, social integration, ethnic relations, and cultural assimilation of Jews in America from 1654 to 2008. Profiles individuals such as Abraham Kohn, a 1840s peddler who voiced the initial disappointment felt by many Jewish immigrants. 2007.

The Last Jews of Kerala: The Two-Thousand-Year History of India’s Forgotten Jewish Community     DB/RC 68834
8 hours 41 minutes
by Edna Fernandes
read by Yolande Bavan
British Indian journalist traces the history of Jews in southwestern India beginning with their arrival in Kerala after the Roman destruction of Jerusalem. Describes the once-thriving culture that became separated along color lines over two millennia and survives in the twenty-first century with fewer than fifty members. 2008.

The Open Road: The Global Journey of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama     DB/RC 68083
7 hours 46 minutes
by Pico Iyer
read by John Horton
The author draws on three decades of conversations with the Dalai Lama to examine the Buddhist leader’s spiritual and political roles. Offers insights into his efforts to teach his religion daily by example, to promote globalism and technology, and to focus world attention on Tibet’s relations with China. 2008.

Really Bad Girls of the Bible: More Lessons from Less-than-Perfect Women     DB/RC 67311
9 hours 28 minutes
by Liz Curtis Higgs
read by Erin Jones
Commentary on biblical women and their behavior. Includes a modern-day retelling followed by the Bible verses. Covers Jael, Bathsheba, Athaliah, Herodias, and Salome among others. 2000.

The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism     DB/RC 66151
9 hours 49 minutes
by Timothy Keller
read by Butch Hoover
Presbyterian minister uses literature, philosophy, and pop culture to offer his reasons for believing in God unconditionally. Discusses the notion of one true religion, scientific refutation of Christianity, social injustice, and suffering. Presents justification for faith and discusses the knowledge of God and the problem of sin. 2008.

Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible: Flawed Women Loved by a Flawless God     DB/RC 67320
10 hours 49 minutes
by Liz Curtis Higgs
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Study of five women of the Bible—Hagar, Sarah, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel—and their behavior. Posits that they appear “good” but in reality are flawed. Presents lessons to be learned from modern-day examples of the same failings. 2007.

Stories behind the Traditions and Songs of Easter     DB/RC 66620
4 hours 42 minutes
by Ace Collins
read by Jack Fox
Award-winning author explores historical and religious origins of customs associated with the Christian holiday of Easter. Discusses the roots of Lent, passion plays, sunrise services, Easter parades, Easter eggs, and the Easter bunny as well as the inspiration for such hymns as “He Lives!” and “The Old Rugged Cross.” 2007.

The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God    RC 64776
6 hours 42 minutes
by Carl Sagan
read by Mark Ashby
Series of lectures on natural theology given by astrophysicist Carl Sagan (1934–1996) at the University of Glasgow in 1985. Discusses the interconnectedness of science and religion, the probability of extraterrestrial intelligence, and the dangers of nuclear war. Edited with an introduction by Sagan’s widow, Ann Druyan. 2006.

What the Gospels Meant     DB/RC 67346
6 hours 4 minutes
by Garry Wills
read by Bob Moore
Pulitzer Prize winner and author of What Jesus Meant (RC 62385) and What Paul Meant (RC 63893) examines the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John; explains their methods and styles; and interprets their goals. Suggests that each Gospel is a meditation on the meaning of Jesus. 2008.

Science and Technology

Apollo’s Fire: A Day on Earth in Nature and Imagination     DB/RC 66861
7 hours 56 minutes
by Michael Sims
read by Jack Fox
Describes events in a distilled, ideal day as the line of demarcation between darkness and light creeps around the globe. Sims draws on both natural and cultural history to examine such topics as dawn cloud shows, circadian rhythms, high noon, changing shadows, and the three kinds of twilight. 2007.

Avoid Boring People: Lessons from a Life in Science     DB/RC 66912
13 hours 11 minutes
by James D. Watson
read by Ted Stoddard
Nobel Prize-winning DNA scientist punctuates his autobiography with irreverent lessons learned along the way, like the one in the title. Discusses his career, highlighting his work at Harvard and with fledgling scientists, and his personal life, including his marriage to a woman who is twenty years his junior. 2007.

The Best American Science Writing, 2007    RC 65518
12 hours 40 minutes
edited by Gina Kolata
read by Michael Kramer
Twenty wide-ranging articles from the New Yorker and other periodicals. In “Stereo Sue” Oliver Sacks explores the marvel of stereoptic vision. Stacey Burling examines the physical toll of Alzheimer’s in “Probing a Mind for a Cure.” Other topics include medicine, computers, linguistics, evolution, global warming, mathematics, and public health. 2007.

Beyond Reach: The Search for the Titanic     DB/RC 66711
5 hours 9 minutes
by William Hoffman and Jack Grimm
read by Erik Synnestvedt
An account of the 1981 search for the wreck of the Titanic financed by Texas oilman and coauthor Jack Grimm. Describes the partially successful attempts of oceanographers, geologists, photographers, and the crew of the Gyre to locate wreckage in the North Atlantic. Also recounts Titanic’s sinking in 1912. 1982.

Dirt: The Erosion of Civilizations     DB/RC 68193
12 hours 57 minutes
by David R. Montgomery
read by Butch Hoover
Geomorphologist examines the role that soil has played throughout civilization from ancient Mesopotamia to 1980s Cuba. Discusses overcultivation and erosion that caused the demise of many societies. Suggests organic farming techniques to avoid future catastrophes. 2007.

The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives     DB/RC 67164
9 hours 36 minutes
by Leonard Mlodinow
read by Bill Wallace
Discusses the role of chance occurrences in the world around us and their effect on human affairs—in politics, business, medicine, economics, sports, and leisure activities. Examines research on the judgments and decisions people have made when faced with imperfect or incomplete information. Studies the consequences of misinterpreted data. 2008.

The Elements: What You Really Want to Know     DB/RC 67668
5 hours 7 minutes
by Ron Miller
read by Kerry Dukin
Discusses the discovery of atomsand the history of the periodic table. Explains the naming of chemical elements and their uses in daily life. Features biographies of major figures in chemistry and basic data on each of the known elements. For junior and  senior high readers. 2006.

The God Machine: From Boomerangs to Black Hawks; the Story of the Helicopter     DB/RC 67727
15 hours 39 minutes
by James R. Chiles
read by Jake Williams
The author, whose research included helicopter lessons, provides a detailed history of the rotary-driven flying machine—before and after its first true flight in the early 1920s. He muses that although the helicopter never replaced cars as some predicted, it did transform military combat, rescue missions, and television news. 2007.

How to Be a Christian in a Brave New World     DB/RC 66581
8 hours 10 minutes
by Joni Eareckson Tada and Nigel M. de S. Cameron
read by Susan McInerney
Bioethics research professor Cameron and Tada, the quadriplegic founder of a Christian disability advocacy organization and author of When God Weeps (RC 49793), offer Christian perspectives on biotechnology issues. They discuss the moral and ethical debates surrounding cloning, genetic engineering, in vitro fertilization, stem-cell research, and other developments. 2006.

The Man Who Loved China: The Fantastic Story of the Eccentric Scientist Who Unlocked the Mysteries of the Middle Kingdom     DB/RC 66913
12 hours 3 minutes
by Simon Winchester
read by Mary Kane
Biography of British biochemist Joseph Needham (1900–1995) discusses his intellectual development, marriage, and long-standing love affair with a visiting Chinese student. Features his travels to China and his investigations into the history of Chinese inventions and technology, including the compass, explosives, and suspension bridges. 2008.

Mind, Life, and Universe: Conversations with Great Scientists of Our Time     DB/RC 66764
13 hours 33 minutes
edited by Lynn Margulis and Eduardo Punset
read by Kristin Allison
Candid interviews with thirty-seven leading scientists who provide insight into their lives and work. Features evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, Nobel Prize winner Sheldon Lee Glashow, chimpanzee researcher Jane Goodall, Gaia Theory conceptualist James E. Lovelock, physicist Lisa Randall, and biologist Edward O. Wilson. Includes suggested readings and contributor biographies. 2007.

The Numerati     DB 68479
7 hours 27 minutes
by Stephen Baker
read by Mark Ashby
BusinessWeek journalist explains data mining and analysis, a field that has greatly expanded with Internet use. Interviews the “numerati”—the people who gather and interpret the data on activities such as voting, shopping, blogging, dating, and terrorism. Discusses research on using data sensors in the home for personal health monitoring. 2008.

Panic in Level 4: Cannibals, Killer Viruses, and Other Journeys to the Edge of Science     DB/RC 67623
8 hours 38 minutes
by Richard Preston
read by Kevin Collins
Author of The Hot Zone (RC 40695) presents a collection of his science writing. Describes Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, a condition that causes self-cannibalism; the quest of Ukrainian American brothers to compute pi; and Preston’s own panic when his biohazard suit broke in a Level 4 biocontainment laboratory. Some violence and some strong language. 2008.

Physics of the Impossible: A Scientific Exploration into the World of Phasers, Force Fields, Teleportation, and Time Travel     DB/RC 67077
13 hours 12 minutes
by Michio Kaku
read by Butch Hoover
Physicist and author of Visions: How Science Will Revolutionize the Twenty-first Century (RC 46238) explores impossibilities that may be realized in the future. Includes speculation on scientific advances such as teleportation, psychokinesis, intelligent robots, time travel, invisibility, and precognition. Bestseller. 2008.

Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain     DB/RC 67928
8 hours 45 minutes
by Maryanne Wolf
read by Kristin Allison
Discusses the evolution of our human brain’s capacity to learn to read. Begins with the origins of writing, proceeds to the development of the reading brain and its pathways to acquisition, and ends with questions about potential transformations due to digital technology. Examines reading difficulties of children with dyslexia. 2007.

Remarkable Creatures: Epic Adventures in the Search for the Origins of Species     DB/RC 69357
9 hours 40 minutes
by Sean B.  Carroll
read by Jim Bond
Molecular biologist evaluates natural history scientists of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing on their studies of evolution, paleontology, and DNA. Discusses research involving dinosaurs and early man and outlines the theories of Charles Darwin, Louis Leakey, Linus Pauling, Allan Wilson, and others. Commercial audiobook. 2009.

Richter’s Scale: Measure of an Earthquake, Measure of a Man    RC 64568
15 hours 51 minutes
by Susan Elizabeth Hough
read by John Haag
Explores the life and career of seismologist Charles Richter (1900–1985), who developed the Richter Scale in the 1930s to gauge earthquake magnitude. Portrays Richter as an intensely private, enigmatic person with complicated family and interpersonal relationships, personality quirks, and latent artistic drive. Discusses his professional reputation and scientific legacy. 2007.

The Science of Leonardo: Inside the Mind of the Great Genius of the Renaissance     DB/RC 67336
10 hours 49 minutes
by Fritjof Capra
read by Gary Tipton
A modern scientist evaluates Leonardo’s fifteenth-century notebooks in this biographical study that focuses on the artist’s use of the scientific method and his wide-ranging achievements. Discusses Leonardo’s systematic investigation of natural phenomena and his integrated worldview—futuristic in his day—that is still relevant to twenty-first-century inquiring minds. 2007.

The Secret Pulse of Time: Making Sense of Life’s Scarcest Commodity     DB/RC 67851
9 hours 54 minutes
by Stefan Klein
read by Butch Hoover
Prizewinning German science journalist asserts that people’s sense of time can be transformed by training their perception and focus. Explores the origins of our sense of inner time and the way humans react to the rhythm of their surroundings. Discusses the cosmic dimension of time. 2006.

Sun in a Bottle: The Strange History of Fusion and the Science of Wishful Thinking     DB/RC 68406
9 hours 13 minutes
by Charles Seife
read by Bill Weideman
Describes scientists’ many attempts, since the first hydrogen bomb was detonated in 1952, to harness nuclear fusion. Discusses the various teams that have tried lasers, magnets, sound waves, particle beams, and metal to tap into the power of the sun. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

The Telephone Gambit: Chasing Alexander Graham Bell’s Secret     DB/RC 67596
6 hours 54 minutes
by Seth Shulman
read by Ted Stoddard
Science journalist alleges that inventor Alexander Graham Bell plagiarized the work of researcher Elisha Gray to file a patent for the telephone. Cites evidence that Bell bribed a U.S. Patent Office official to view Gray’s February 1876 application. Documents other unscrupulous dealings by Bell. 2008.

The Ten Most Beautiful Experiments     DB/RC 67102
4 hours 40 minutes
by George Johnson
read by Butch Hoover
Award-winning science writer recounts landmark historic experiments whose simplicity he finds beautiful. Explores discoveries made by Galileo on the laws of motion, William Harvey on blood circulation, Isaac Newton on the color spectrum, Michael Faraday on electromagnetism, and Ivan Pavlov on conditioned responses. 2008.

This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession    RC 65609
12 hours 24 minutes
by Daniel J. Levitin
read by John Lescault
Neuroscientist and musician investigates the role of music in human evolution and daily life. Examines the science of music from the perspective of cognitive neuroscience. Discusses how the brain processes music, details studies on musical meaning and pleasure, and offers insights into personal perceptions and preferences. 2006.

The Varieties of Scientific Experience: A Personal View of the Search for God    RC 64776
6 hours 42 minutes
by Carl Sagan
read by Mark Ashby
Series of lectures on natural theology given by astrophysicist Carl Sagan (1934–1996) at the University of Glasgow in 1985. Discusses the interconnectedness of science and religion, the probability of extraterrestrial intelligence, and the dangers of nuclear war. Edited with an introduction by Sagan’s widow, Ann Druyan. 2006.

Von Braun: Dreamer of Space, Engineer of War     DB/RC 66334
26 hours 5 minutes
by Michael J. Neufeld
read by Lou Harpenau
Smithsonian historian analyzes the life of engineer Wernher von Braun (1912–1977) who developed Nazi Germany’s V-2 rocket before he surrendered and was sent to the United States in 1945. Highlights von Braun’s management of American missile and space programs and posits that he was a genius at organizational leadership. 2007.

Welcome to BioTech Nation: My Unexpected Odyssey into the Land of Small Molecules, Lean Genes, and Big Ideas     DB/RC 67224
10 hours 10 minutes
by Moira A. Gunn
read by Mary Kane
Science journalist and radio host explores biotechnology and its implications. Blends anecdotes from her career with reports on developments in the field. Discusses genetically modified food, tumor-killing viruses, obesity genes, and industrial enzymes. 2007.

Your Inner Fish: A Journey into the 3.5-Billion-Year History of the Human Body     DB/RC 67828
7 hours 4 minutes
by Neil Shubin
read by Lou Harpenau
Paleontologist posits that human bodies and minds have evolved from parts common to other creatures. Discusses the ways in which fossils explain the inner workings of our organs. Describes reconstructing relationships between long-dead animals and the anatomy and genes of recent ones. 2008.

Back to top

Social Sciences

American Nerd: The Story of My People     DB/RC 67572
5 hours 51 minutes
by Benjamin Nugent
read by Mark Delgado
Journalist and blogger offers a sociological study of the social misfit defined as a “nerd.” Traces the concept throughout modern history and popular culture. Analyzes the nerd in relation to online gaming, science fiction clubs, Asperger’s syndrome, and ethnic stereotypes. Some strong language. 2008.

The Arab Americans: A History    RC 65313
27 hours 3 minutes
by Gregory Orfalea
read by Peter Ganim
Syrian American author of Before the Flames (RC 34162) chronicles three waves of Arab immigration to America from the late-nineteenth to the twenty-first century using interviews, profiles, and his memoirs. Describes Arab American organizations and the impact of the September 11 terrorist attacks on this ethnic community. 2006.

Black Crescent: The Experience and Legacy of African Muslims in the Americas     DB/RC 67652
21 hours 40 minutes
by Michael A. Gomez
read by Robin Miles
Social history of African Muslims in the Western Hemisphere, beginning with fifteenth-century Latin America. Describes revolts in Brazil, “slaveocracy” in the Caribbean, and Islamic societies in the United States. Discusses the influence of Noble Drew Ali, Malcolm X, and the Nation of Islam. ALA Black Caucus Award. 2005.

Emily Post: Daughter of the Gilded Age, Mistress of American Manners     DB/RC 68850
22 hours 4 minutes
by Laura Claridge
read by Barbara Caruso
Biography of twentieth-century etiquette expert Emily Price Post (1872–1960). Details Post’s privileged upbringing, scandalous 1906 divorce, and decision to work as a fiction writer to support her family. Describes Post’s rise as a bestselling author after publishing her first book of manners in 1922 at age fifty. 2008.

Gay America: Struggle for Equality     DB/RC 68234
5 hours 37 minutes
by Linas Alsenas
read by Kristin Allison
History of homosexuality in America focuses primarily on the twentieth century. Uses first-person accounts to illustrate the social and political milieu of several time periods and chronicles the milestone events affecting this population. For senior high readers. 2008.

How Does It Feel to Be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America     DB/RC 68087
11 hours 15 minutes
by Moustafa Bayoumi
read by Peter Ganim
Professor relates the problems encountered by seven twentysomething Arab Americans living in Brooklyn, New York, since the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. Describes the FBI’s detention of Syrian-born Rasha and her family. Recounts the harassment endured by male college student Sami on campus. 2008.

Isn’t It Their Turn to Pick Up the Check? Dealing with All of the Trickiest Money Problems between Family and Friends—from Serial Borrowers to Serious Cheapskates     DB/RC 67124
6 hours 12 minutes
by Jeanne Fleming and Leonard Schwarz
read by Carol Dines
Money magazine contributors explain etiquette and ethics for everyday financial situations. They provide advice on interactions that involve loaning, borrowing, and inheriting money. Authors also describe fiscal problems that arise over moral flaws, irresponsibility, and obligations and suggest ways to resolve such difficulties. 2008.

Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes behind the Veil    RC 64555
9 hours 11 minutes
by Deborah Rodriguez
read by Anne Hancock
Michigan hairdresser recounts her experiences as founder and director of the Kabul Beauty School, Afghanistan’s first modern beauty academy, which she opened in 2002 after the fall of the Taliban. Describes how she taught, befriended, and empowered her students despite financial problems, language barriers, and cultural misunderstandings. Bestseller. 2007.

Last Best Gifts: Altruism and the Market for Human Blood and Organs    RC 64340
8 hours 34 minutes
by Kieran Healy
read by Michael Scherer
Sociologist examines the moral, economic, and logistical debate surrounding the voluntary gift and commercial exchange of human goods. Explores the ethical dilemmas of providing financial incentives for blood and organ donation. Addresses growing demand and contrasts procurement techniques of programs in Europe and the United States. 2006.

Love in Black and White: A Memoir of Race, Religion, and Romance    RC 65473
12 hours 58 minutes
by William S. Cohen
read by Bob Moore
Former secretary of defense William Cohen, a Republican, reflects on some of the defining moments in his inter-racial marriage to television journalist Janet Langhart, a Democrat. Discusses their very different lives before their 1996 wedding and the shared interests and beliefs that make their marriage work. Some strong language. 2007.

Making Malcolm: The Myth and Meaning of Malcolm X    RC 64081
5 hours 37 minutes
by Michael Eric Dyson
read by Dave Corey
Baptist minister and author of Is Bill Cosby Right? (RC 62585) examines the complex image and influence of African American religious leader Malcolm X (1925–1965). Analyzes conflicting literary perceptions and discusses the impact of his intellectual legacy on black cinema, hip-hop culture, black nationalism, and challenges facing black males. 1995.

Once upon a Quinceañera: Coming of Age in the USA     DB/RC 67199
9 hours 17 minutes
by Julia Alvarez
read by Annie Wauters
The author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent (RC 34544) researches the “sweet fifteen” birthday celebration that heralds a Latina girl’s entrance into womanhood. Reminisces about her own coming-of-age and discusses the trends she observes in American quinceañeras. Also advocates for a support system for Hispanic teens. 2007.

Outliers: The Story of Success     DB/RC 68164
9 hours 18 minutes
by Malcolm Gladwell
read by Frank Coffee
The author of The Tipping Point (RC 50027) and Blink (RC 60186) examines successful people whom he calls “outliers”—those with skills, talent, and drive who do things out of the ordinary. Discusses the influence of timing, culture, circumstance, birth dates, and luck on the outlier’s ability to succeed. Bestseller. 2008.

TheTen-Cent Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America     DB/RC 67625
14 hours 18 minutes
by David Hajdu
read by Kevin Collins
Professor and author of Positively Fourth Street (RC 52658) examines the 1940s and 1950s controversy surrounding comic books that depicted crime, lust, and horror. Describes campaigns by church groups, politicians, and moral crusaders to censor the publications. Profiles Bill Gaines of Mad magazine and others who endured the onslaught. 2008.

There Is No Me without You: One Woman’s Odyssey to Rescue Africa’s Children    RC 64532
17 hours 8 minutes
by Melissa Fay Greene
read by Catherine Byers
Biography of Haregewoin Teferra, a middle-class widow in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, who has dedicated her life to finding new homes for the children of AIDS-infected parents. Discusses the AIDS pandemic in Africa, the origins of her unofficial orphanage, the children’s backgrounds, and their international placements with adoptive parents. 2006.

Traffic: Why We Drive the Way We Do (and What It Says about Us)     DB/RC 67537
17 hours 36 minutes
by Tom Vanderbilt
read by Jake Williams
Journalist analyzes the theories and science of traffic to explain technical factors that make it work and human factors that affect it. Explains the ways individual perception and cognition contribute to traffic jams and road rage. Discusses safety issues and international differences in driving. Bestseller. 2008.

What Are Old People For? How Elders Will Save the World    RC 65121
13 hours 31 minutes
by William H.  Thomas
read by Bob Moore
Gerontologist and founder of the Eden Alternative uses biology, mythology, sociology, and philosophy to support his claim that elders are crucial to human survival. Criticizes our society’s ageism and misconceptions of maturity. Details his ideas about caring for elderly people and includes case studies. 2004.

Where Have All the Leaders Gone?    RC 64556
7 hours 28 minutes
by Lee Iacocca
read by Dan Bloom
Former head of Ford and Chrysler lambastes the Bush administration, business leaders, and the media for the war in Iraq, the deficit, outsourcing, rising health-care and gas costs, and other national woes. Shares leadership lessons from history and his own experience and urges readers to bring about change. Bestseller. 2007.

The World of Mexican Migrants: The Rock and the Hard Place     DB/RC 67566
8 hours 13 minutes
by Judith Adler Hellman
read by Mark Ashby
Professor presents interviews with undocumented Mexican immigrants living in Los Angeles and New York. In their own words, individuals describe leaving their homeland, crossing the border, and adjusting to life in the United States, including finding work and housing, raising children, and avoiding detection. 2008.

Sports and Recreation

All for a Few Perfect Waves: The Audacious Life and Legend of Rebel Surfer Miki Dora     DB/RC 67074
20 hours 47 minutes
by David Rensin
read by Alec Volz
Acquaintences and family members discuss Miki “Da Cat” Dora, who died of cancer at age sixty-seven in 2002. They describe Dora as a scam artist who achieved surfing fame in the fifties and sixties in Malibu, roamed the world seeking perfect waves, and tried to avoid arrest. Strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

American Shaolin: Flying Kicks, Buddhist Monks, and the Legend of Iron Crotch; an Odyssey in the New China     DB/RC 67650
12 hours 6 minutes
by Matthew Polly
read by Christopher Hurt
Travel writer describes the two years he spent studying kung fu at the Shaolin Temple, the birthplace of Zen Buddhism and martial arts. Discusses his 1992 journey to China, where he absorbed the culture and came of age. Some strong language. For senior high and older readers. Alex Award. 2007.

American Son: My Story     DB/RC 67784
7 hours 9 minutes
by Oscar De La Hoya
read by Mark Delgado
Boxing’s “golden boy” De La Hoya relates his professional experiences and his successes in the ring, where he won six world championships and an Olympic gold medal. He also recounts the triumphs and failings in his personal life. 2008.

Awesome Bill from Dawsonville: My Life in NASCAR    RC 64356
12 hours 17 minutes
by Bill Elliott
read by Ray Childs
Autobiography of NASCAR champion Bill Elliott. Recounts his rural Dawson County, Georgia, childhood with a strict father who had a passion for stockcar racing. Elliott describes his teen years competing on dirt tracks, his 1972 professional start, and the races he won over thirty years. 2006.

The Backwash Squeeze and Other Improbable Feats: A Newcomer’s Journey into the World of Bridge    RC 66133
12 hours 46 minutes
by Edward McPherson
read by Robert Sams
Author’s homage to the card game he describes as one of “deep complexity and infinite mystery.” McPherson discusses bridge’s history and development, famous players, and the gaming circuit as he recounts his personal efforts to learn its intricacies before competing in a national tournament. Provides a brief tutorial. 2007.

The Best American Sports Writing, 2007    RC 65568
16 hours 22 minutes
edited by David Maraniss
read by Don Hagen
Twenty-eight diverse selections from U.S. and Canadian periodicals. Includes Larry Brown’s tale of a white raccoon, Bruce Wallace’s take on the murder of an Iraqi soccer player in Baghdad, and L. Jon Wertheim’s account of Kwame James, the basketball player who helped subdue the terrorist shoe bomber. 2007.

Beyond Belief: Finding the Strength to Come Back     DB/RC 68489
7 hours 28 minutes
by Josh Hamilton
read by Erik Synnestvedt
Autobiography of an All-Star outfielder for the Texas Rangers. Hamilton describes being first pick in the 1999 baseball draft as a high school senior. Details his time in the minor leagues and discusses the cocaine addiction that jeopardized his life until a spiritual redemption in 2005 saved him. 2008.

The Bicycle Book: Wit, Wisdom, and Wanderings     DB/RC 67205
4 hours 40 minutes
edited by Jim Joyce
read by Steven Carpenter
A collection of articles, essays, and poetry that Joyce deems “a celebration of the bicycle by people who ride.” Includes Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Thomas Hylton’s editorial about cycling-friendly communities, an interview with Lance Armstrong’s coach Chris Carmichael, joyful accounts of cycling adventures, and travel and mechanical advice. 2007.

Brett Favre: The Tribute    RC 66328
5 hours 6 minutes
published by Sports Illustrated
read by John Polk
Sixteen Sports Illustrated articles about former professional football quarterback Brett Favre, who played for the Green Bay Packers from 1992 to 2008. Leigh Montville’s “The Kid from Kiln” portrays Favre as a Mississippi rookie. Peter King’s “Do You Believe?” describes the game following the death of Favre’s father. Bestseller. 2008.

A Champion’s Mind: Lessons from a Life in Tennis     DB/RC 67312
11 hours 7 minutes
by Pete Sampras
read by Alec Volz
Sampras, who officially retired in 2002 at age thirty-one, discusses his career. Credits his work ethic, confidence, determination, and skills for making him the world’s number-one tennis player six years in a row and enabling him to win fourteen Grand Slam titles. Includes his commentary on other tennis greats. 2008.

Driving with the Devil: Southern Moonshine, Detroit Wheels, and the Birth of NASCAR     DB/RC 65880
16 hours 8 minutes
by Neal Thompson
read by Alec Volz
Journalist chronicles the origins of stock car racing. Highlights the Atlanta trio of Raymond Parks, Red Vogt, and Red Byron, who sold moonshine in the 1930s and 1940s and needed fast cars to outrun the law. Discusses the 1948 founding of NASCAR and its evolution. 2006.

Force of Nature: Mind, Body, Soul, and, of Course, Surfing     DB/RC 68228
5 hours 23 minutes
by Laird Hamilton
read by Erik Sandvold
Surfer Hamilton outlines strategies and philosophies that have contributed to his successful career. Details his exercise and nutrition regimens, discusses the importance of family and nature, and describes his various surfboards. Provides comments from other sports and fitness experts, including his wife, former professional volleyball player Gabrielle Reece. Bestseller. 2008.

The Genius: How Bill Walsh Reinvented Football and Created an NFL Dynasty     DB 68658
15 hours 45 minutes
by David Harris
read by Erik Synnestvedt
Author of The League (RC 27202) uses first-person interviews to portray the career of San Francisco 49ers football coach Bill Walsh (1931–2007). Details Walsh’s 1979 hiring by team owner Edward DeBartolo, the coach’s invention of the “West Coast offense,” and his college-draft selections, including Joe Montana. Some strong language. 2008.

Hard Driving: The Wendell Scott Story; the American Odyssey of NASCAR’s First Black Driver     DB/RC 67647
12 hours 4 minutes
by Brian Donovan
read by Bill Quinn
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter recounts the career of Wendell Scott (1921–1990), NASCAR’s first African American driver. Uses first-person accounts to highlight the prejudice and violence Scott experienced competing in a sport dominated by Southern whites. Some strong language. 2008.

Haunted Baseball: Ghosts, Curses, Legends, and Eerie Events     DB/RC 67877
8 hours 19 minutes
by Mickey Bradley and Dan Gordon
read by Jack Fox
The authors—who spent a year and a half interviewing fans, professional players, managers, and clubhouse employees—present anecdotes about strange happenings in the world of baseball. Includes “The Ghosts of Yankee Stadium,” “I See Dead People,” and “Bedeviled.” 2007.

Living on the Black: Two Pitchers, Two Teams, One Season to Remember     DB/RC 67213
17 hours 21 minutes
by John Feinstein
read by Erik Synnestvedt
Sportswriter chronicles the 2007 baseball season of two veteran pitchers—Mike Mussina of the New York Yankees and Tom Glavine of the New York Mets—as they try to reach the playoffs. Details the ways these players coped with their physical limitations and used their game knowledge to achieve personal milestones. 2008.

Maradona: The Autobiography of Soccer’s Greatest and Most Controversial Star    RC 66260
12 hours 23 minutes
by Diego Armando Maradona
read by Jeremy Gage
Argentinean soccer star recounts his rise from the slums of Buenos Aires to the Boca Juniors soccer club and the rank of international superstar. Details the most important games of his career at home and in Europe. Describes his drug controversies and 2004 heart attack. Strong language. 2004.

No Limits: The Will to Succeed     DB/RC 68428
7 hours 47 minutes
by Michael Phelps
read by Mark Ashby
Autobiography of American swimmer Michael Phelps, who won eight gold medals at the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in China. Describes his Maryland upbringing with two older sisters who were champion swimmers, the diagnosis of his attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and his training routine. Maintains that hard work, confidence, and perseverance are necessary for success. 2008.

Shades of Glory: The Negro Leagues and the Story of African-American Baseball     DB/RC 67203
21 hours 23 minutes
by Lawrence D. Hogan
read by Patrick Downer
Chronicles African American baseball from the nineteenth century until Jackie Robinson broke into the major leagues in 1945. Uses first-person accounts to profile the teams and players. Covers the business aspects of the league. Commissioned by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Foreword by Jules Tygiel. 2006.

What I Talk about When I Talk about Running     DB/RC 67781
4 hours 3 minutes
by Haruki Murakami
read by Steven Carpenter
Author of The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle (RC 46636) explains his abrupt decisions to take up writing and then running. Describes practicing over the following twenty-three years, progressing from jogs to triathlons. Discusses ways his writing life differs from the “cozy, homemade void” of his sport. Originally published in Japanese. 2008.

Stage and Screen

American Prince: A Memoir     DB/RC 68389
10 hours 24 minutes
by Tony Curtis
read by Jack Fox
Eighty-three-year-old movie star Tony Curtis describes working with noted actors and directors in films such as Some Like It Hot and The Rat Race. He discusses his personal life, struggle with drugs, five marriages, six children—including actress Jamie Lee Curtis—and his side career as a painter. Some strong language. 2008.

Considering Doris Day    RC 65377
17 hours 17 minutes
by Tom Santopietro
read by Ray Hagen
Assessment of the career of big-band singer and post-World War II actress Doris Day (born 1924). Highlights her professional achievements that comprised thirty-nine films and more than six hundred songs. Relates Day’s personal life including her stage mother, unsuccessful marriages, adherence to Christian Science religion, and animal rights activism. 2007.

Don’t Mind if I Do     DB 68472
11 hours 34 minutes
by George Hamilton and William Stadiem
read by Robert Sams
Actor Hamilton—known for his roles in movies like Zorro, the Gay Blade, his appearances on television’s Dancing with the Stars, and his ever-present suntan—describes creating his persona with help from his flamboyant mother and half brother. Discusses his decades-long Hollywood career and his relationships with rich and famous people. 2008.

Ernie: The Autobiography     DB/RC 68766
9 hours 0 minutes
by Ernest Borgnine
read by Joe Wilson
Ninety-one-year-old Borgnine describes his ongoing acting career, which has included almost thirty onscreen deaths. His character and leading roles include the Academy Award-winning title portrayal in Marty, the commander in the television series McHale’s Navy, and Frank Sinatra’s murderer Fatso in From Here to Eternity. Some strong language. 2008.

Here’s the Story: Surviving Marcia Brady and Finding My True Voice     DB/RC 68028
9 hours 39 minutes
by Maureen McCormick
read by Margaret Strom
At age fifty-one, former child actress McCormick describes an early life of drug abuse and troubled family dynamics that contrasts with her wholesome alter ego—the popular Marcia Brady character from television’s The Brady Bunch. She discusses motherhood, a long and happy marriage, and finding contentment. Some strong language. 2008.

Home: A Memoir of My Early Years     DB/RC 66539
13 hours 30 minutes
by Julie Andrews
read by Jill Ferris
British actress describes growing up a child star with her vaudevillian mother and stepfather. By book’s end she has given a royal command performance, acted in Broadway’s Camelot and My Fair Lady, is married with a child, and is heading to Hollywood in 1963 to film Mary Poppins. Bestseller. 2008.

Leni: The Life and Work of Leni Riefenstahl     DB/RC 67367
15 hours 43 minutes
by Steven Bach
read by Mark Ashby
Biography of German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl (1902–2003), a dancer/actress in 1920s Berlin who developed as a director during Adolf Hitler’s rise. Examines her propaganda work in the 1930s movies Triumph of the Will and Olympia, use of forced Gypsy labor from Nazi camps, and knowledge of war crimes. Violence. 2007.

Lessons in Becoming Myself     DB/RC 67389
17 hours 43 minutes
by Ellen Burstyn
read by Martha Harmon Pardee
Autobiography of the Academy Award-winning actress known for her roles in The Exorcist, Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, and The Last Picture Show. She recounts studying under Lee Strasberg, enduring a marriage to an increasingly psychotic fellow actor, meeting success in her career, and exploring spiritualism. Some strong language. 2006.

Life beyond Measure: Letters to My Great-Granddaughter     DB/RC 66936
8 hours 38 minutes
by Sidney Poitier
read by Bob Moore
Academy Award-winning African American actor and author of memoirs This Life (RC 63615) and The Measure of a Man (RC 50313) recounts life lessons and philosophies in twenty-three autobiographical letters to his great-granddaughter who was born in 2005. Discusses their extended family, his childhood, his barrier-breaking acting career, and the environment. 2008.

My Word Is My Bond: A Memoir     DB 68655
14 hours 28 minutes
by Roger Moore
read by David Cutler
British actor Moore, known for his long-running movie role as James Bond and his television show The Saint, discusses these and other highlights of his career. The eighty-one-year-old reminisces about the many luminaries he worked with and recalls his childhood, personal life, and work for UNICEF. Some strong language. 2008.

Pieces of My Heart: A Life     DB/RC 67757
10 hours 42 minutes
by Robert J. Wagner
read by Joe Peck
Autobiography of actor Robert Wagner—born in 1930 and known for his starring roles in movies and television series It Takes a Thief and Hart to Hart. Reminisces about his career, children, and well-publicized relationships, including two marriages with Natalie Wood. Some strong language. Bestseller. 2008.

Sit, Ubu, Sit: How I Went from Brooklyn to Hollywood with the Same Woman, the Same Dog, and a Lot Less Hair     DB/RC 66864
6 hours 52 minutes
by Gary David Goldberg
read by Barry Bernson
Award-winning sitcom writer and producer details his personal and professional life before and after he was “discovered” in a writing class in the 1970s. Goldberg describes his work on Family Ties and Spin City and recounts his friendships with celebrities such as actor Michael J. Fox. Some strong language. 2008.

Somewhere in Heaven: The Remarkable Love Story of Dana and Christopher Reeve     DB/RC 67577
6 hours 34 minutes
by Christopher Andersen
read by Annie Wauters
Portrait of actor Christopher Reeve (1952–2004) and his singer-actress wife Dana (1961–2006) and their deepening bond following a 1995 riding accident that caused Chris’s quadriplegia. Discusses their advocacy for spinal-cord research, Chris’s therapy and unexpected death, and Dana’s death from lung cancer seventeen months later at age forty-four. 2008.

Up till Now: The Autobiography     DB/RC 67034
15 hours 41 minutes
by William Shatner
read by Richard Davidson
Shatner reminisces about his life and acting career, poking fun at his own experiences. Describes playing Captain Kirk in the Star Trek series and starring in shows such as Boston Legal. Details his personal successes and tragedies, including the accidental death of his wife Narine. Some strong language. 2008.

Wishful Drinking     DB/RC 68419
2 hours 52 minutes
by Carrie Fisher
read by Susan McInerney
Memoir of novelist and actress Fisher—the daughter of stars Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher—in which she describes her tangled Hollywood family. Discusses her marriage to musician Paul Simon, her role as Princess Leia in Star Wars, and her addictions and manic depression. Strong language and some descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 2008.

Travel

Aku-Aku: The Secret of Easter Island     DB/RC 66640
14 hours 29 minutes
by Thor Heyerdahl
read by Butch Hoover
Author of Kon-Tiki (RC 22841) recounts his 1955 expedition to the Southeast Pacific, where he and his team sought the origins of Easter Island’s enormous stone statues. Heyerdahl describes his excavations and experiences uncovering the natives’ closely guarded secrets with help from his aku-aku—his personal guardian spirit. 1958.

American Indian Places: A Historical Guidebook     DB/RC 68073
21 hours 13 minutes
by Frances H. Kennedy
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Historical guide to 366 sites within the United States that are significant to Native Americans and open to the public, organized by geographic region. Each location is listed with an essay conveying its importance, history, and archaeological background. Addresses proper visitor protocol. 2008.

The Caliph’s House     DB/RC 67303
9 hours 40 minutes
by Tahir Shah
read by Jack Fox
Inspired by childhood vacations in Morocco, the author convinces his wife to leave rainy London for sunny Casablanca. Describes searching for a home with the right mystique and discusses the cultural adjustments necessary to live in a society that believes in jinns—invisible spirits prevalent in the Islamic world. 2006.

Down the Nile: Alone in a Fisherman’s Skiff     DB/RC 67048
11 hours 30 minutes
by Rosemary Mahoney
read by Alice Rosengard
Rower and award-winning author recounts her 120-mile solo journey along the Nile between the Egyptian cities of Aswan and Qena. Describes her search for a boat, her excitement in finding ancient ruins, and the obstacles she faced as she confronted searing heat and cultural differences. Strong language. 2007.

First Stop in the New World: Mexico City, the Capital of the Twenty-first Century     DB/RC 68032
10 hours 35 minutes
by David Lida
read by Mark Ashby
Resident journalist offers an insider’s social chronicle of the largest metropolis—twenty million people—in the western hemisphere. Describes wealthy citizens and street vendors; gracious old colonial and modern, densely packed neighborhoods; the sex district and the arts and entertainment scene; and the enjoyment he finds living there. Descriptions of sex. 2008.

The Geography of Bliss: One Grump’s Search for the Happiest Places in the World     DB/RC 65862
11 hours 55 minutes
by Eric Weiner
read by Jack Fox
National Public Radio foreign correspondent and self-proclaimed curmudgeon Weiner describes the places he visited during a yearlong hunt for the happiest people. Investigates conditions in the Netherlands, Switzerland, Bhutan, Qatar, Iceland, Moldova, Thailand, Great Britain, India, and the United States. Bestseller. 2008.

Greasy Rider: Two Dudes, One Fry-Oil-Powered Car, and a Cross-Country Search for a Greener Future     DB/RC 68872
8 hours 11 minutes
by Greg Melville
read by Jim Zeiger
Freelance journalist recounts his road trip from Vermont to California in a converted 1985 Mercedes diesel station wagon that ran on recycled french-fry grease. Describes visits to eco-friendly places of interest such as Google’s solar-powered headquarters, Fort Knox’s geothermal energy system, an environmentally responsible Wal-Mart, and a wind farm. 2008.

In Arabian Nights: A Caravan of Moroccan Dreams     DB/RC 67319
11 hours 3 minutes
by Tahir Shah
read by Jack Fox
Continues the author’s exploration of Morocco, begun in The Caliph’s House (RC 67303). Shah collects stories and colloquial wisdom from descendants of characters found in A Thousand and One Nights as he traverses the desert and meanders in the markets of Fez and Marrakech. 2008.

Jewish Heritage Travel: A Guide to Eastern Europe     DB/RC 66587
17 hours 51 minutes
by Ruth Ellen Gruber
read by Suzanne Toren
Guide to hundreds of synagogues, cemeteries, Jewish communities, museums, Holocaust memorials and other sites of Jewish interest in fourteen eastern European countries including the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, and Ukraine. The author reflects on the legacy of World War II and postwar communism. Includes travel tips and resources. 2007.

A Land of Ghosts: The Braided Lives of People and the Forest of Far Western Amazonia     DB/RC 67349
8 hours 33 minutes
by David G. Campbell
read by Mark Ashby
Botanist and author of The Crystal Desert: Summer in Antarctica (RC 36818) describes his sojourns into western Brazil’s Amazon river valley to survey the region’s bio- diversity. Reflects on rainforest inhabitants—scientists, colonists, mixed-heritage Caboclos, and, in particular, Native Americans, who are experiencing the loss of culture and homeland. 2005.

Narrow Dog to Carcassonne     DB/RC 68254
11 hours 1 minute
by Terry Darlington
read by David Hartley-Margolin
Retiree Darlington describes the odyssey he and his wife Monica undertook with a problematic canal narrowboat named Phyllis May and a boat-hating whippet dog called Jim. Against advice, they all traveled across the English Channel and down the Rhone River to the south of France. Some strong language. 2005.

One Hundred One Accessible Vacations: Travel Ideas for Wheelers and Slow Walkers     DB/RC 67755
12 hours 45 minutes
by Candy B. Harrington
read by Faith Potts
Author of Barrier-Free Travel (RC 61293) provides a guide to U.S. destinations for people with mobility problems. Details cities, national parks, historical attractions, and recreational opportunities under categories such as big city, the great outdoors, road trips, cruises, small towns, and family fun. Covers lodging. 2008.

Roads to Quoz: An American Mosey     DB/RC 68364
18 hours 17 minutes
by  William Least Heat-Moon
read by Jack Fox
The word-maven author of Blue Highways (RC 18700) chronicles another journey on the back roads of America. This time Heat-Moon and his wife Q pursue the enigmatic “quoz”—anything strange, incongruous, or peculiar with connections to the cosmos. Their meandering starts with the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas. 2008.

Shadow of the Silk Road    RC 65278
12 hours 58 minutes
by Colin Thubron
read by John Horton
Travel writer, author of In Siberia (RC 51481) and Behind the Wall (RC 34567), chronicles his journey along the ancient Silk Road from central China to the Mediterranean coast of Turkey. Describes his third-class passages, his encounters with the people of central Asia, and witnessing the war in Afghanistan. 2007.

Travels in a Blue Chair: Alaska to Zambia, Ushuaia to Uluru; a Series of Short Stories     DB/RC 67926
14 hours 9 minutes
by Walt Balenovich
read by Guy Williams
Balenovich, who had polio in childhood, recounts adventures in his blue-colored wheelchair—a device he believes does not confine him, but gives him the freedom to travel and meet new friends. Describes exploring Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, celebrating Chinese New Year in Thailand, and breaking a knee in Zambia. 2007.

The Wilderness of the Upper Yukon: A Hunter’s Explorations for Wild Sheep in Sub-Arctic Mountains     DB/RC 66131
10 hours 25 minutes
by Charles Sheldon
read by Patrick Downer
Author recounts his 1904–1905 field expeditions in Alaska to hunt bighorn sheep. Recalls traveling by steamboat and canoe, with packhorses, and on foot, sometimes in the company of friends. Describes the country landscape, weather, and wildlife he encountered. 1911.

U.S. History

The Age of American Unreason     DB/RC 66150
16 hours 11 minutes
by Susan Jacoby
read by Kerry Dukin
Social critic traces the history and consequences of American anti-intellectualism from the 1960s. Condemns mass media, fundamentalist religion, the educational system, and pseudoscience for the antirationalism she observes throughout society. Laments the public’s lack of reading, debasement of public speech, and unwillingness to hear other viewpoints. Bestseller. 2008.

Alice: Alice Roosevelt Longworth, from White House Princess to Washington Power Broker    RC 66415
24 hours 2 minutes
by Stacy A. Cordery
read by Barbara Caruso
Uses personal papers to detail Alice Longworth’s influential life (1884–1980). Includes descriptions of her formative years as Teddy Roosevelt’s daughter, her White House wedding and marriage to Republican representative Nicholas Longworth, and her affair and child with Senator Bill Borah. Also discusses her role as “the other Washington monument.” 2007.

America Dreaming: How Youth Changed America in the Sixties     DB/RC 66633
8 hours 19 minutes
by Laban Carrick Hill
read by John Polk
Chronicles the life of American teenagers who came of age during the 1960s. Highlights the cultural, social, and political changes that occurred due to the activism of the era. Using primary sources, examines civil rights, women’s liberation, antiwar, and environmental movements. For senior high readers. 2007.

America’s Hidden History: Untold Tales of the First Pilgrims, Fighting Women, and Forgotten Founders Who Shaped a Nation     DB/RC 66907
7 hours 59 minutes
by Kenneth C. Davis
read by Robert Sams
Author of the Don’t Know Much About series describes overlooked episodes in early American history. Includes Queen Isabella’s advice to Columbus to take pigs to the New World—animals that introduced diseases to the natives—and George Washington’s attack on French soldiers who were on a diplomatic mission. Violence. 2008.

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Death and How It Changed America     RC 66789
7 hours 17 minutes
by Michael Eric Dyson
read by Bill Quinn
Georgetown University professor and author of I May Not Get There with You (RC 64510) continues his analysis of Martin Luther King Jr.’s influence in America. Shares his assessment of racial progress while discussing the leadership roles and flaws of African Americans Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and Barack Obama. 2008.

The Assassin’s Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln     DB/RC 66976
8 hours 28 minutes
by Kate Clifford Larson
read by Laural Merlington
Author of Bound for the Promised Land (RC 64511) investigates the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Focuses on the involvement of boarding-house owner Mary Surratt. Reexamines primary documents to assert that Mary and her son John, both Confederate sympathizers, participated in John Wilkes Booth’s plot. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

The Birth of Black America: The First African Americans and the Pursuit of Freedom at Jamestown    RC 65665
12 hours 14 minutes
by Tim Hashaw
read by Bill Quinn
Journalist traces the 1619 arrival of the first Africans in the Virginia colony. Describes the abduction of Bantus from Portuguese Angola in an attack on a Spanish ship by British pirates. Highlights the freed captives’ skills as tradesmen and farm owners before slavery engulfed their descendants. 2007.

Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero    RC 64511
16 hours 36 minutes
by Kate Clifford Larson
read by Gabra Zackman
The author uses first-person accounts to portray Harriet Tubman (c. 1820–1913), a fugitive slave from Maryland’s Eastern Shore, who led others to freedom via the Underground Railroad. Recalls Tubman’s rescues, Civil War exploits, postwar suffrage and community activism, and her family life and spirituality. Some violence. 2004.

The California Gold Rush and the Coming of the Civil War     DB/RC 66763
10 hours 52 minutes
by Leonard L. Richards
read by Jake Williams
History professor chronicles the fight for California between pro- and anti-slavery groups after the Mexican War. Describes the impact the discovery of gold had on the political climate, the rush for statehood, and an 1859 duel between senator David Broderick and state supreme court judge David S. Terry. 2007.

Capitol Men: The Epic Story of Reconstruction through the Lives of the First Black Congressmen     DB 68329
19 hours 37 minutes
by Philip Dray
read by Bob Moore
Author of At the Hands of Persons Unknown (RC 55259) portrays post-Civil War African Americans who were elected to Congress as state representatives. Discusses Hiram Revels, Benjamin Turner, Jefferson Long, Richard Cain, Joseph H. Rainey, and others and the social and political issues of their time. 2008.

Dangerous Nation    RC 64609
26 hours 29 minutes
by Robert Kagan
read by Joe Peck
Author who wrote Of Paradise and Power (RC 55548) argues that the United States has always been an expansionist power because of desire for land and need to ensure internal stability by engaging abroad. Concentrates on the nineteenth century, when America ousted European powers and survived civil war. 2006.

The Day Freedom Died: The Colfax Massacre, the Supreme Court, and the Betrayal of Reconstruction     DB/RC 66980
12 hours 38 minutes
by Charles Lane
read by Jim Bond
Journalist documents the 1873 murders of nearly one hundred African Americans by white supremacists in Colfax, Louisiana. Analyzes the event and the political, social, and legal atmosphere that led to an 1875 Supreme Court decision denying federal responsibility to protect civil rights. Violence and strong language. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

Do All Indians Live in Tipis? Questions and Answers from the National Museum of the American Indian     DB/RC 66795
6 hours 16 minutes
by National Museum of the American Indian
read by Christopher Hurt
Reference queries received by the staff of the National Museum of the American Indian. Dozens of questions answered by Native Americans cover history, culture, and language. Topics include ceremonies, totem poles, myths, captivity stories, slavery, clothing, tribal enrollment, and government benefits. For senior high and older readers. 2007.

Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans  Brought to America     DB 68627
18 hours 13 minutes
by Sylviane A.  Diouf
read by Bob Moore
Narrates the fate of one hundred ten West African captives smuggled into the United States during the summer of 1860—less than a year before the start of the Civil War. Discusses their years of captivity, post-war emancipation, and establishment of Africatown, Alabama. Some violence and some strong language. 2007.

The Drillmaster of Valley Forge: The Baron de Steuben and the Making of the American Army     DB/RC 68052
10 hours 30 minutes
by Paul Lockhart
read by Mark Ashby
Biography of Prussian army officer Friedrich von Steuben (1730–1794), who trained the ragged U.S. Continental Army to fight the British during the Revolutionary War. Focuses on the winter of 1778, when Steuben drilled the demoralized colonial troops at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, in European techniques of war. 2008.

Escape on the Pearl: The Heroic Bid for Freedom on the Underground Railroad    RC 65136
14 hours 26 minutes
by Mary Kay Ricks
read by Bob Moore
Recounts the 1848 escape attempt from Washington, D.C., of some seventy fugitive slaves aboard the schooner Pearl. Describes their daring journey and capture in the Chesapeake Bay, highlighting the experiences of six members of the Edmonson family. Describes the incident’s effect on the slavery debate in Congress and public circles. 2007.

Fifteen Stars: Eisenhower, MacArthur, Marshall; Three Generals Who Saved the American Century    RC 65091
24 hours 59 minutes
by Stanley Weintraub
read by Michael Scherer
Examines the lives of three American military leaders whose careers intertwined during the twentieth century. Discusses their personal characteristics, public images, and contributions to history. 2007.

Final Salute: A Story of Unfinished Lives     DB/RC 67110
6 hours 51 minutes
by Jim Sheeler
read by Roy Avers
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Sheeler recounts the two years he spent shadowing marine major Steve Beck, an officer whose job is to notify the families of fallen soldiers. Sheeler describes the lives of the deceased, Beck’s efforts to comfort the grieving relatives, and the toll on surviving kin. 2008.

For Love of Politics: Inside the Clinton White House    RC 65210
21 hours 43 minutes
by Sally Bedell Smith
read by Martha Harmon Pardee
The author of Grace and Power: The Private World of the Kennedy White House (RC 58448) examines the intertwined personal and professional lives of former U.S. president Bill Clinton and his wife. Uses private papers, public records, and interviews with government officials to explain the couple’s relationship. Some strong language. 2007.

The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression     DB/RC 66807
17 hours 17 minutes
by Amity Shlaes
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Economics reporter analyzes the Great Depression era in the United States and posits that federal intervention in the economy lengthened its duration. Considers economic plans from members of Franklin Roosevelt’s brain trust and alternate solutions of outsiders such as African American Father Divine and Alcoholics Anonymous founder Bill Wilson. 2007.

Franklin and Lucy: President Roosevelt, Mrs. Rutherfurd, and the Other Remarkable Women in His Life     DB/RC 66938
17 hours 24 minutes
by Joseph E. Persico
read by Ted Stoddard
Examines the relationships between President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the important women in his life: his mother Sara, his wife Eleanor, Mrs. Winthrop Rutherfurd (née Lucy Mercer), his secretary Missy LeHand, and his distant cousin Daisy Suckley. 2008.

Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice    RC 64220
41 hours 27 minutes
by Raymond Arsenault
read by Gregory Gorton
Narrative of the 1961 campaign by black and white activists to integrate interstate buses and travel facilities in the Deep South. Details the organizations and individual Freedom Riders who endured beatings and prison. Discusses the role of city and state leaders, the Kennedy administration, and the FBI. 2006.

Gall: Lakota War Chief     DB/RC 68174
12 hours 53 minutes
by Robert W. Larson
read by Peter Johnson
History professor’s biography of Hunkpapa Sioux warrior Gall (ca. 1840–1894). Explores Gall’s relationship with Sitting Bull during the Battle of the Little Bighorn and its aftermath, his clashes with the U.S. government before he ultimately moved his tribe onto a reservation, and his dedication to his people. Spur Award. 2007.

George Washington’s Secret Navy: How the American Revolution Went to Sea     DB/RC 67398
16 hours 55 minutes
by James L. Nelson
read by Ray Childs
Award-winning author examines the establishment of an American navy during the Revolutionary War. Discusses the roles of the Continental Congress and George Washington in the October 1775 authorization for the first ships. Details the skirmishes between Washington’s armed schooners and the British fleet. 2008.

Going down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King’s Last Campaign     DB/RC 66008
24 hours 11 minutes
by Michael K. Honey
read by Frank Coffee
Chronicles the dramatic events in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1968, concerning the sanitation workers’ strike for union rights that led to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Assesses the strikers’ impact on the civil rights movement. Includes oral histories of participants. 2007.

The Great Chicago Fire and the Myth of Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow     DB/RC 65881
18 hours 33 minutes
by Richard F. Bales
read by Lou Harpenau
A detailed examination of the historical evidence of one of the worst fires in American history. Using land-tract records and transcripts from the 1871 investigation, Bales posits that the more prominent theories on the fire’s origins—and the story of Mrs. O’Leary’s cow—were implausible. Illinois State Historical Society Award. 2002.

The Growth of Southern Civilization, 1790–1860     DB/RC 66926
14 hours 56 minutes
by Clement Eaton
read by Robert Sams
Antebellum history of the American South uses original sources to portray its broad variety of geographic, ethnic, and economic cultures, consisting of rice planters, tobacco farmers, poor whites, Creoles, slaves, a middle class, and city folk. Editors’ introduction by Henry Steele Commager and Richard Brandon Morris. 1961.

High Noon in Lincoln: Violence on the Western Frontier    RC 65490
9 hours 17 minutes
by Robert M. Utley
read by Mary Kane
Historian examines the Lincoln County War (1878–1879) in New Mexico and finds no heroes on either side. Interprets the event’s significance as a case study that dramatized the economic forces and personality types underlying frontier violence and that created the legend of Billy the Kid. 1987.

How the States Got Their Shapes     DB/RC 67306
7 hours 0 minutes
by Mark Stein
read by Gary Tipton
Traces the history of each state’s unique outline—from the era of large territorial blocks owned by Spain, France, and England to our modern-day jigsaw-puzzle borders. Discusses military skirmishes, land grabs, religious issues, and local geographic disputes that explain boundary oddities   for Delaware, Minnesota, and the unattached parts of Michigan. 2008.

I Wish I’d Been There: Twenty Historians Bring to Life Dramatic Events That Changed America     DB/RC 66476
12 hours 29 minutes
edited by Byron Hollinshead
read by Joe Wilson
Historians portray events from U.S. history that they would have liked to witness firsthand. Mary Beth Norton examines the Salem witchcraft trials. Paul Nagel imagines himself at the 1841 Amistad trial. Thomas Fleming joins the 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry. Clayborne Carson remembers the 1963 March on Washington. 2006.

If by Sea: The Forging of the American Navy, from the American Revolution to the War of 1812     DB/RC 67361
20 hours 5 minutes
by George C. Daughan
read by Annie Wauters
Traces the origins of the U.S. Navy. Highlights naval conflicts between British and American forces during the Revolutionary War. Discusses debates among the Founding Fathers—which lasted through the first four administrations—concerning the need for a blue-water fleet and explains why the 1812 declaration of war deemed one necessary. 2008.

Island World: A History of Hawai’i and the United States     DB/RC 68477
9 hours 28 minutes
by Gary Y. Okihiro
read by Mark Ashby
Asian American professor uses primary sources to present a native’s view of the social and cultural history of the Hawaiian Islands and the islands’ relationship to the United States. Discusses the people’s diaspora, education, geology, music, myths, literature, and wars. Describes the influence of New England Christian missionaries. 2008.

The Jewish Americans: Three Centuries of Jewish Voices in America     DB/RC 66398
14 hours 21 minutes
by Beth S. Wenger
read by Suzanne Toren
Companion piece to a 2008 PBS television series uses first-person accounts to examine the history, social integration, ethnic relations, and cultural assimilation of Jews in America from 1654 to 2008. Profiles individuals such as Abraham Kohn, a 1840s peddler who voiced the initial disappointment felt by many Jewish immigrants. 2007.

A Land So Strange: The Epic Journey of Cabeza de Vaca; the Extraordinary Tale of a Shipwrecked Spaniard Who Walked across America in the Sixteenth Century     DB/RC 68086
10 hours 56 minutes
by Andrés Reséndez
read by Suzanne Toren
Historian profiles Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca, who, with three others, survived a failed 1528 Spanish expedition to Florida. Describes the group’s harrowing passage across the Gulf of Mexico, years of captivity in what later became Texas, and trek through the wilderness to the Pacific coast. Violence. 2007.

Nathan Hale: The Life and Death of America’s First Spy     DB/RC 68402
8 hours 17 minutes
by M. William Phelps
read by Phil Gigante
Biography of famed patriot and American Revolution hero Nathan Hale (1755–1776), who was hung by the British for spying. Uses primary sources to detail Hale’s years at Yale and his teaching career before he joined the Connecticut militia. Some violence. Commercial audiobook. 2008.

Nez Perce Country     DB/RC 67069
6 hours 17 minutes
by Alvin M. Josephy Jr.
read by Christopher Hurt
The founding chair of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian surveys the history of the Nez Perce tribe of the Pacific northwest. Discusses the interactions between natives and settlers after the Lewis and Clark expeditions, including massacres, land grabs, and treaty negotiations. Introduction by Jeremy Fivecrows. 2007.

The Nez Perces in the Indian Territory: Nimiipuu Survival     DB/RC 68093
12 hours 9 minutes
by J. Diane Pearson
read by Christopher Hurt
American Indian Studies professor traces the history of the Nez Perces and their maltreatment by the U.S. government. Focuses on the years after the 1877 undeclared war when the Pacific Northwest Indians were deported to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Describes their legal battles and daily suffering from poverty and disease. 2008.

Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power    RC 65097
28 hours 34 minutes
by Robert Dallek
read by Robert Sams
Examines the characters and motivations of President Richard Nixon and his political advisor Henry Kissinger. Discusses the effects of their collaboration on American policies from 1969 to 1974. Analyzes their political successes, including opening China and détente with the Soviet Union, and their policy failures, like the Vietnam war. 2007.

Nothing to Fear: FDR’s Inner Circle and the Hundred Days That Created Modern America     DB 68645
15 hours 5 minutes
by Adam Cohen
read by Margaret Strom
Chronicles President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s first months in office beginning on March 4, 1933. Describes the relief programs presidential advisors Raymond Moley, Lewis Douglas, Henry Wallace, Harry Hopkins, and Frances Perkins established to alleviate effects of the economic depression that began in 1929, and examines the resulting transformations in national philosophy. 2009.

On the Road to Freedom: A Guided Tour of the Civil Rights Trail     DB/RC 67352
13 hours 33 minutes
by Charles E. Cobb Jr.
read by Bob Moore
Journalist and civil rights activist Cobb discusses points of interest in eight states and Washington, D.C., that were significant to the civil rights movement of the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. For each site, provides detailed narratives of the historic events, such as the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. 2008.

Our Savage Neighbors: How Indian War Transformed Early America     DB/RC 67329
13 hours 45 minutes
by Peter Silver
read by Lou Harpenau
Professor asserts that from the 1750s to the 1780s provincial leaders united the diverse European settlers of the rural mid-Atlantic colonies into a cohesive unit by using the fear and horror of Indian attacks. Posits that settlers became united against a common enemy and established democracy. Violence. 2008.

Patriot Pirates: The Privateer War for Freedom and Fortune in the American Revolution     DB/RC 68001
10 hours 7 minutes
by Robert H. Patton
read by Jake Williams
Details America’s maritime conflicts with the British during the Revolutionary War, which consisted primarily of commissioned private American vessels attacking enemy ships. Describes the huge profits the privateer owners made from their wartime activities and discusses the ways their new-found wealth propelled the nation’s entrepreneurialism. 2008.

The Perils of Peace: America’s Struggle for Survival after Yorktown     DB/RC 66275
15 hours 0 minutes
by Thomas Fleming
read by Jake Williams
Focuses on the time period immediately after the 1781 American victory at Yorktown until the 1783 final treaty. Highlights the British, French, and colonial statesmen involved in peace negotiations. Posits that George Washington’s renunciation of absolute power to become a private citizen was the pivotal affirmation of democracy. 2007.

A Pocketful of History: Four Hundred Years of America—One State Quarter at a Time     DB/RC 67327
10 hours 30 minutes
by Jim Noles
read by Butch Hoover
Essays examine the design choices and related history behind each of the coins comprising the Fifty State Quarters Program. Describes the varied subject matter, ranging from the arts to nature and including many state mottoes. Provides specifics of the commemorative program begun in 1999. 2008.

President Lincoln: The Duty of a Statesman     DB/RC 66880
21 hours 34 minutes
by William Lee Miller
read by Butch Hoover
The author of Lincoln’s Virtues (RC 57259) continues his examination of the sixteenth president’s moral and intellectual life—this time covering Lincoln’s term in the White House. Discusses his determination to preserve the Union and to avoid armed conflict. Describes the ethical challenge of slavery. 2008.

Samuel Adams: A Life     DB/RC 68849
12 hours 36 minutes
by Ira Stoll
read by John Haag
Biography of American revolutionary leader and newspaper editor Samuel Adams (1722–1803) highlights the religious convictions of this Founding Father. Discusses Adams’s role in instigating the Boston Tea Party, his belief that the call to arms was God’s plan to free America, and his post-war political career. 2008.

Seven Fires: The Urban Infernos That Reshaped America     DB/RC 66521
15 hours 20 minutes
by Peter Charles Hoffer
read by Bob Moore
Chronicles city fires that changed American social, economic, and political structure from the 1760 colonial Boston blaze to the September 11, 2001, conflagration in Manhattan. Reconstructs tragedies in 1845 Pittsburgh, 1871 Chicago, 1904 Baltimore, 1967 Detroit, and 1991 Oakland Hills, California. Includes a primer on fire and urban renewal. 2006.

A Short History of the United States     DB/RC 67896
15 hours 11 minutes
by Robert V. Remini
read by Butch Hoover
Historian chronicles the development of the United States from settlement of the land by nomads during the Ice Age to early-twenty-first-century civilization. Discusses the discovery of the New World by Europeans, the founding of the republic, and foreign and civil wars. Highlights the evolution of democratic principles. 2008.

Slavery and the Making of America     DB/RC 67626
10 hours 27 minutes
by James Oliver  Horton and Lois E. Horton
read by Bill Quinn
Authors use slave narratives and primary documents to examine American slavery from 1619 to the Civil War. Explores economic, social, and cultural aspects of the practice and highlights contributions by African Americans to U.S. development. Companion to PBS presentation. Violence and strong language. 2005.

Southern Storm: Sherman’s March to the Sea     DB/RC 67744
26 hours 43 minutes
by Noah Andre Trudeau
read by Jake Williams
The author of Gettysburg (RC 54927) uses primary documents to analyze William T. Sherman’s march through Confederate Georgia in the autumn of 1864. Disputes the notion of total war and argues that Sherman’s main objective was to convince Southerners to rejoin the Union. Some violence and some strong language. 2008.

Steel Drivin’ Man: John Henry, the Untold Story of an American Legend     DB/RC 67453
8 hours 8 minutes
by Scott Reynolds Nelson
read by Joe Wilson
History professor explores the truths behind the legend of railway man John Henry. Recounts his imprisonment and forced labor for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. Confirms Henry’s 1871 contest with a steam drill, explores his mysterious death, and traces the evolution of the folk song that immortalizes his exploits. 2006.

This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War     DB/RC 65912
11 hours 39 minutes
by Drew Gilpin Faust
read by Bill Wallace
President of Harvard University interprets the significance of the U.S. Civil War’s death toll. States that two percent of the country’s population was killed and many died without proper burials. Analyzes the way those losses transformed American society, culture, and politics through the experience of shared suffering. Violence. Bestseller. 2008.

Twilight at Monticello: The Final Years of Thomas Jefferson     DB/RC 66246
11 hours 37 minutes
by Alan Pell Crawford
read by Jake Williams
Uses primary sources to chronicle the postpresidential years (1809–1826) of Thomas Jefferson. Describes problems he had with a dysfunctional extended family, agricultural mismanagement, soaring debt, and deteriorating health. Highlights Jefferson’s establishment of the secular University of Virginia and his correspondence with John Adams. 2008.

Waking Giant: America in the Age of Jackson     DB 68467
15 hours 50 minutes
by David S. Reynolds
read by Robert Sams
Award-winning historian and author of Walt Whitman’s America (RC 41371) chronicles the cultural transformation of U.S. society between 1815 and 1848. Describes immigration, religious revivals, economic growth, transportation advances, a literature and art renaissance, and the addition of new states. Highlights the rise of Andrew Jackson and his policies. 2008.

Washington: The Making of the American Capital     DB/RC 66905
10 hours 59 minutes
by Fergus M. Bordewich
read by Steven Carpenter
Chronicles the early history of the nation’s capital, highlighting the political struggles, sectional rivalry, backroom dealing, and big money that led to the 1790 establishment of Washington, D.C. Discusses the people involved in the city’s construction, including engineer Peter Charles L’Enfant, African American surveyor Benjamin Banneker, and slaves. 2008.

West from Appomattox: The Reconstruction of America after the Civil War     DB/RC 66553
18 hours 6 minutes
by Heather Cox Richardson
read by Bill Wallace
History professor focuses on the formation of a middle class in post-Civil War America and asserts that its members defined the nation’s identity at home and abroad for the next century and beyond. Highlights the era’s sectional animosities, racial tensions, booming industrialization, suffragist activism, and westward expansion. 2007.

What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815–1848     DB/RC 66021
39 hours 57 minutes
by Daniel Walker Howe
read by Peter Johnson
Chronicles the decades between the War of 1812 and the end of the Mexican American war. Highlights the advancements in communication and transportation, the growth of the abolitionist movement, the rivalry between North and South, and the expansion of the western territories. Pulitzer Prize. 2007.

The Wordy Shipmates     DB/RC 67904
7 hours 40 minutes
by Sarah Vowell
read by Kerry Dukin
A history of the Puritan founders of New England. Contrasts Loyalist Massachusetts Bay Colony founder John Winthrop with earlier Plymouth settlers led by the Reverend John Cotton. Discusses the philosophies of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson, colonists’ conflicts with Native Americans, and the Puritans’ influence on American values. Bestseller. 2008.

Write It When I’m Gone: Remarkable Off-the-Record Conversations with Gerald R. Ford     DB/RC 66303
9 hours 8 minutes
by Thomas M. DeFrank
read by Gregory Gorton
Former White House reporter DeFrank presents “an anecdotal memoir” of U.S. president Gerald Ford’s life in politics, which Ford asked to remain unpublished until after his death. Using interviews from 1991 to 2006, DeFrank highlights Ford’s character and his candid assessments of contemporaries, including Richard Nixon and Jimmy Carter. 2007.

War

Aircraft Carriers at War: A Personal Retrospective of Korea, Vietnam, and the Soviet Confrontation    RC 66379
19 hours 14 minutes
by James L. Holloway III
read by Christopher Hurt
Retired navy admiral James L. Holloway III, a former member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, traces the history and operations of U.S. naval aviation. Describes the Cold War’s events, decisions, and outcomes, highlighting the importance of the navy’s principal ship—the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier. Foreword by George H.W. Bush. 2007.

American Heroes: In the Fight against Radical Islam     DB/RC 66999
10 hours 50 minutes
by Oliver North
read by Jake Williams
Former marine presents firsthand accounts of American soldiers who are fighting the war on terror in Afghanistan, Iraq, the Persian Gulf, and the Philippines. North chronicles his visits to the front lines and profiles men and women as they risk their lives to track down enemy insurgents. 2008.

Blood Brothers: Among the Soldiers of Ward 57    RC 64534
9 hours 29 minutes
by Michael Weisskopf
read by Richard Davidson
Award-winning Time correspondent describes his recovery at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C., after losing his right hand to a hand grenade in Baghdad in 2003. Features accounts of his wardmates, three soldiers who were also undergoing treatment in the amputee ward. Strong language and some violence. 2006.

Brotherhood of Warriors: Behind Enemy Lines with a Commando in One of the World’s Most Elite Counterterrorism Units     DB/RC 67463
7 hours 56 minutes
by Aaron Cohen and Douglas Century
read by Erik Sandvold
The Beverly Hills author Cohen recounts dropping out of college in 1996 to join the Sayeret Duvdevan, an Israeli special-forces counterterrorist unit founded in 1987 in response to the First Intifada. Discusses his missions, including going undercover in enemy territory to prevent attacks on Israel. Violence and strong language. 2008.

Curveball: Spies, Lies, and the Con Man Who Caused a War    RC 66485
12 hours 3 minutes
by Bob Drogin
read by Mark Ashby
Investigates CIA reliance on unverified information from Ahmed Hassan Mohammed, “Curveball,” an Iraqi chemical engineer who sought political asylum in Germany in 1999. Examines the discovery, during interrogations that occurred after the invasion of Iraq, that the defector’s prewar tales of Saddam’s mobile weapons of mass destruction were fabricated. 2007.

An Enormous Crime: The Definitive Account of American POWs Abandoned in Southeast Asia    RC 66084
30 hours 39 minutes
by Bill Hendon and Elizabeth A. Stewart
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Former congressman Hendon and Stewart, an attorney whose father is MIA in North Vietnam, chronicle the fates of missing POWs in Vietnam and Laos. Draws on declassified materials and satellite imagery to argue that hundreds of prisoners remain and that postwar administrations have ignored or covered up evidence. Some strong language. 2007.

Escape from the Deep: The Epic Story of a Legendary Submarine and Her Courageous Crew      DB/RC 68171
6 hours 36 minutes
by Alex Kershaw
read by Peter Johnson
Author of The Longest Winter (RC 62917) recounts the final patrol of the USS Tang, which sank off China’s coast in October 1944 after a torpedo malfunction. Describes the nine survivors’ escape from the wreck and months of deprivation and torture at a Japanese prison camp. Some violence. 2008.

Fateful Choices: Ten Decisions That Changed the World, 1940–1941     DB/RC 65641
28 hours 49 minutes
by Ian Kershaw
read by Dennis Rooney
British historian examines the decisions—made by world leaders Hitler, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, Mussolini, and Tojo—that determined the course of World War II. Includes Germany’s invasion of the Soviet Union, Great Britain’s refusal to negotiate after the fall of France, and Japan’s seizure of European interests in Southeast Asia. 2007.

For Liberty and Glory: Washington, Lafayette, and Their Revolutions     DB/RC 66070
20 hours 8 minutes
by James R. Gaines
read by Peter Johnson
Chronicles the intricate friendship between two generals, the American George Washington and the French Marquis de Lafayette. Discusses the complex rebellions in the United States and France that forged an enduring alliance between the countries. Analyzes the generals’ collaborations and conflicts and covers Lafayette’s tumultuous life in Europe. 2007.

The Forever War     DB/RC 68103
12 hours 51 minutes
by Dexter Filkins
read by Ken Kliban
New York Times correspondent presents vignettes about his years covering terrorism in the Middle East, beginning in 1998. Describes being embedded with U.S. marines in Iraq, watching Taliban executions in Afghanistan, being arrested in Pakistan, and witnessing the 2001 terrorist attack on New York City. Violence and strong language. 2008.

The French Foreign Legion: A Complete History of the Legendary Fighting Force     DB/RC 66484
39 hours 45 minutes
by Douglas Porch
read by Fred Major
History of the multinational military force established in 1831 and its relationship to the French army and society. Describes the elite troops’ role in France’s colonial wars—including those in Algeria and Indochina—and both world wars. Uses primary sources and historical accounts to document the legion’s battles and leaders. Violence. 1991.

Halsey’s Typhoon: The True Story of a Fighting Admiral, an Epic Storm, and an Untold Rescue     DB/RC 66099
11 hours 22 minutes
by Bob Drury and Tom Clavin
read by Christopher Hurt
Account of Typhoon Cobra, a devastating Pacific storm that struck Admiral William Halsey’s fleet near the Philippines in December 1944, sinking three ships and claiming the lives of some eight hundred men. Describes the efforts of USS Tabberer captain Henry Plage, who defied orders and rescued drifting sailors. 2007.

Hess: The Man and His Mission      DB/RC 68092
11 hours 18 minutes
by  J. Bernard Hutton
read by Richard Davidson
Account of Hitler’s deputy Rudolph Hess, who in 1941 attempted to negotiate peace between Germany and Britain. Describes Hess’s mysterious flight to Scotland and his dubious mental state. Argues that Hitler approved the mission. Includes the complete text of Hess’s statement as told to the Nuremberg Tribunal in 1945. 1970.

How They Won the War in the Pacific: Nimitz and His Admirals     DB/RC 66524
19 hours 39 minutes
by Edwin P. Hoyt
read by Ted Stoddard
Details the strategies and battles of Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, commander in chief of the U.S. Pacific fleet during World War II, and those under his direction. Highlights the abilities of Admirals William Halsey and Raymond Spruance, and others at Midway, Guadalcanal, the Aleutians, the Marianas, Leyte, and Okinawa. 2000.

The Irregulars: Roald Dahl and the British Spy Ring in Wartime Washington     DB/RC 67827
14 hours 39 minutes
by Jennet  Conant
read by Kerry Dukin
Describes a British spy ring that operated in Washington, D.C., during World War II. Recounts the mission of Roald Dahl, an RAF pilot, and others sent in 1942 to gather information and promote propaganda with the intent of accelerating U.S. entry into the war in Europe. Some strong language. 2008.

Ivan’s War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939–1945    RC 64221
17 hours 55 minutes
by Catherine Merridale
read by Ken Kliban
British historian uses declassified archives and veterans’ testimonies to portray the lives of ordinary Soviet soldiers during World War II. Describes Stalin’s regime, the high death rate amid squalid conditions, and the savagery committed in Germany by Russian forces. Violence, strong language, and descriptions of sex. 2006.

The Making of a Quagmire: America and Vietnam during the Kennedy Era     DB/RC 68194
9 hours 59 minutes
by David Halberstam
read by Barry Bernson
Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter’s firsthand account of the Vietnam War before President Johnson’s escalation of American involvement. Analyzes foreign policy failures of U.S. military and political leaders and the downfall of South Vietnamese president Ngo Dinh Diem. Revised edition includes an introduction by Daniel J. Singal. First published in 1965. 2008.

On Call in Hell: A Doctor’s Iraq War Story    RC 64744
8 hours 15 minutes
by Richard Jadick
read by Walter Dixon
Commander Jadick, a former Marine officer who became a Navy doctor, chronicles his service in Iraq as a battalion surgeon in 2004. Describes following the First Battalion, Eighth Marine Regiment, and working under fire in Fallujah to save soldiers wounded in heavy street fighting. Violence and strong language. 2007.

One Soldier’s War     DB/RC 67635
13 hours 18 minutes
by Arkady Babchenko
read by Frank Coffee
Memoir of journalist who, drafted into the Russian Army in 1995, fought in both the first and second Chechen wars. Recalls the drudgery, terror, and brutality of frontline conflicts. Translated from Russian by Nick Allen. Violence and some strong language. 2006.

A Plague upon Humanity: The Secret Genocide of Axis Japan’s Germ Warfare Operation    RC 67651
9 hours 36 minutes
by Daniel Barenblatt
read by Peter Johnson
Documents Japan’s covert biological and chemical warfare program during the 1930s and 1940s. Uses firsthand accounts to describe the death camps and the experiments conducted on hundreds of thousands of civilians in occupied Asia. Alleges that America and its allies granted the perpetrators immunity in exchange for information. Violence. 2004.

Retribution: The Battle for Japan, 1944–1945     DB/RC 66833
28 hours 23 minutes
by Max Hastings
read by Lou Harpenau
In this companion to Armageddon: The Battle for Germany (RC 59750), the author documents the last year of World War II in Asia that ended with Japan’s devastation. Follows key figures on both sides in the struggle for control of the continent using archival material and interviews with veterans. Violence. 2007.

Sister in the Band of Brothers: Embedded with the 101st Airborne in Iraq     RC 64374
12 hours 15 minutes
by Katherine M. Skiba
read by Anne Hancock
Longtime female journalist for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel describes joining an Army helicopter unit to cover the March 2003 invasion of Iraq. Details experiencing media boot camp, sandstorms, missile attacks, and snake encounters while forming an attachment to the men and women of her unit. Violence and strong language. 2005.

Soldiers and Sled Dogs: A History of Military Dog Mushing     DB/RC 68435
3 hours 53 minutes
by Charles L. Dean
read by Mark Ashby
Arctic expert and former army officer chronicles the use of sled dogs in military operations, from 1900s Alaska and World Wars I and II to modern-day sledge patrols. Describes the bonds between soldiers and dogs and canine roles in search-and-rescue missions and parachute drops. Also covers sled types. 2005.

Thermopylae: The Battle That Changed the World     DB/RC 67505
12 hours 17 minutes
by Paul Cartledge
read by Ken Kliban
Classical historian Cartledge, author of The Spartans (RC 58416), focuses on the critical 480 B.C.E. military conflict between the invading Persians, led by King Xerxes, and the defending Spartans of Greece. Details the two empires’ cultural differences and describes the battle’s outcome, which determined the course of Western civilization. 2006.

The Three-Trillion-Dollar War: The True Cost of the Iraq Conflict     DB/RC 67618
11 hours 19 minutes
by Joseph E. Stiglitz and Linda J. Bilmes
read by Ralph Lowenstein
Five years after the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, Nobel Prize-winner Stiglitz, author of Globalization and Its Discontents (RC 54445), and government finance expert Bilmes estimate the costs of America’s involvement in the war. Veterans’ health-care and disability benefits are included in the budgetary projection. 2008.

The Ultimate Battle: Okinawa, 1945—the Last Epic Struggle of World War II     DB/RC 67875
14 hours 49 minutes
by Bill Sloan
read by Barry Bernson
Former investigative reporter and author of Given Up for Dead: America’s Heroic Stand at Wake Island (RC 59200) chronicles the WWII battle for the Japanese stronghold of Okinawa. Uses firsthand accounts of U.S. soldiers—who recall their personal combat experiences—to detail the three-month-long campaign. Violence and some strong language. 2007.

The War Within: A Secret White House History, 2006–2008     DB/RC 67539
16 hours 46 minutes
by Bob Woodward
read by Bill Wallace
Woodward examines President George W. Bush’s management of the war in Iraq. Discusses political, social, and moral issues involved, including, Woodward reports, the United States spying on Iraqi allies and estrangement between the White House and the U.S. military. Sequel to State of Denial (RC 63560). Bestseller. 2008.

We Are Soldiers Still: A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam     DB/RC 67672
6 hours 25 minutes
by Harold G. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway
read by Ray Foushee
Retired lieutenant general Moore and military correspondent Galloway follow up their account of combat in We Were Soldiers Once—and Young: Ia Drang, the Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam (RC 38628) by returning to the battlefield with American veterans and meeting with former North Vietnamese commanders. Violence. 2008.

Why Marines Fight     DB/RC 66697
11 hours 35 minutes
by James Brady
read by Ted Stoddard
Bronze star recipient and author of The Coldest War (RC 32978) presents forty firsthand accounts of marine combat veterans from World War II to Afghanistan. Profiles Senator James Webb, baseball player Gerald Coleman, and others who describe their motivations, battlefield experiences, and postwar lives. Strong language and some violence. 2007.

The West

The West After Lewis and Clark: Mountain Men and the Paths to the Pacific     DB/RC 66174
15 hours 42 minutes
by Robert M. Utley
read by Roy Avers
Historian describes early 1800s exploration of the territory west of the Mississippi River by fur traders. Discusses the role of conscious expansionists such as Jedediah Smith, Joseph Meek, and Kit Carson and other contributors like James Bridger, Pegleg Smith, and Black Harris. Originally titled A Life Wild and Perilous. 1997.

Shadows at Dawn: A Borderlands Massacre and the Violence of History     DB/RC 68416
14 hours 16 minutes
by Karl Jacoby
read by Christopher Hurt
Arizona territory. Describes the April 30, 1871, Camp Grant Massacre, when Americans, Mexicans, and Tohono O’odham Indians slaughtered Apaches who were under the protection of the U.S. Army. Discusses the social, political, and economic climate from the viewpoints of the four ethnic groups involved. Violence. 2008.

Women's Concern

Bad Girls of the Bible: And What We Can Learn from Them     DB/RC 67302
11 hours 15 minutes
by Liz Curtis Higgs
read by Kerry Dukin
Fictional retelling of the stories of ten biblical women, followed by commentary on the lessons to be learned from each character. Defines the author’s notion of “badness” and features Eve, Rahab, Delilah, Lot’s wife, Jezebel, Potiphar’s wife, Sapphira, Michal, the Woman at the Well, and the Sinful Woman. 1999.

The Nice Girl Syndrome: Stop Being Manipulated and Abused—and Start Standing Up for Yourself     DB/RC 67216
9 hours 21 minutes
by Beverly Engel
read by Margaret Strom
Domestic-abuse expert advises women to become stronger and take charge of their own lives. Discusses the societal traditions that condition women to be “nice girls” but may set them up to be used and/or abused. Offers suggestions for overcoming negative behaviors and empowering oneself. 2008.

Once upon a Quinceañera: Coming of Age in the USA     DB/RC 67199
9 hours 17 minutes
by Julia Alvarez
read by Annie Wauters
The author of How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent (RC 34544) researches the “sweet fifteen” birthday celebration that heralds a Latina girl’s entrance into womanhood. Reminisces about her own coming-of-age and discusses the trends she observes in American quinceañeras. Also advocates for a support system for Hispanic teens. 2007.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause    RC 66354
16 hours 32 minutes
by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective
read by Kerry Dukin
Describes the process of menopause for women and covers health-care options for its symptoms. Includes medical and alternative treatments such as stress management, diet, and exercise. Discusses scientific research studies and encourages women to focus on making good personal health-care decisions. Highlights women’s natural life transitions. 2006.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Pregnancy and Birth    RC 66371
17 hours 57 minutes
by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective
read by Kerry Dukin
Information about all stages of pregnancy, childbirth, and the postpartum period. Discusses choosing medical care, planning the birth, and attending to the pregnant woman’s physical and emotional care. Describes special concerns during pregnancy and childbirth and covers the tests that may be involved. Also addresses infant feeding options. 2008.

Pearls, Politics, and Power: How Women Can Win and Lead     DB 68677
9 hours 25 minutes
by Madeleine M. Kunin
read by Faith Potts
Vermont’s first female governor calls on women to assume more leadership roles in politics and bring issues such as family, education, health care, the environment, and diplomacy to the forefront. Profiles notables past and present, including journalist Gloria Steinem, to highlight women’s experiences in public office. 2008.

Really Bad Girls of the Bible: More Lessons from Less-than-Perfect Women     DB/RC 67311
9 hours 28 minutes
by Liz Curtis Higgs
read by Erin Jones
Commentary on biblical women and their behavior. Includes a modern-day retelling followed by the Bible verses. Covers Jael, Bathsheba, Athaliah, Herodias, and Salome among others. 2000.

Slightly Bad Girls of the Bible: Flawed Women Loved by a Flawless God     DB/RC 67320
10 hours 49 minutes
by Liz Curtis Higgs
read by Mitzi Friedlander
Study of five women of the Bible—Hagar, Sarah, Rebekah, Leah, and Rachel—and their behavior. Posits that they appear “good” but in reality are flawed. Presents lessons to be learned from modern-day examples of the same failings. 2007.

World History

The Accidental Empire: Israel and the Birth of the Settlements, 1967–1977    RC 64267
18 hours 12 minutes
by Gershom Gorenberg
read by Ken Kliban
Jerusalem journalist and author of The End of Days (RC 56149) examines the Israeli policies for settlement of the territories conquered in the 1967 Six-Day War. Claims missed chances for peace, militant pioneering of the land, and the ever-changing political climate were the causes of conflict with the Palestinians. 2006.

AK47: The Story of a Gun     DB/RC 67307
8 hours 37 minutes
by Michael Hodges
read by Alec Volz
Traces the history of the world’s most ubiquitous gun, the AK47. Describes the way the weapon enabled the Soviet Union to control vast territories, became an icon of Third World revolution, and evolved into a symbol for international terrorism. Violence and some strong language. 2007.

The Americano: Fighting with Castro for Cuba’s Freedom     DB/RC 66860
9 hours 14 minutes
by Aran Shetterly
read by Ray Foushee
Journalist recounts the life of William Morgan, an Ohioan who joined Cuba’s revolutionary movement in the late 1950s to bring freedom and democracy to the island nation. Describes Castro’s adoption of a communist platform and Morgan’s subsequent anti-Castro and counterrevolutionary activities, which led to his 1961 arrest and execution. 2007.

Amerigo: The Man Who Gave His Name to America    RC 65624
9 hours 27 minutes
by Felipe Fernández-Armesto
read by Laura Giannarelli
Author of The Americas: A Hemispheric History (RC 56832) portrays Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci (1454–1512). Describes Vespucci’s various careers as jewel trader, navigator, cosmographer, and author. Discusses his business endeavors in the New World and his rivalry with Columbus. Documents Vespucci’s lack of accomplishments and his knack for self-promotion. 2007.

The Ayatollah Begs to Differ: The Paradox of Modern Iran     DB/RC 68827
11 hours 8 minutes
by Hooman Majd
read by Peter Ganim
A Western-educated and Western-raised son of a diplomat explores the essence of Iranian society in the twenty-first century. Asserts that most “ordinary” citizens want more social freedoms and a better economy, yet many maintain their Islamic Shia “sensibility.” Covers cultural and political aspects of the country. 2008.

The Bin Ladens: An Arabian Family in the American Century     DB/RC 66746
24 hours 19 minutes
by Steve Coll
read by Erik Sandvold
Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Ghost Wars (RC 57940) outlines the history of the Arabian Peninsula’s Bin Laden family. Begins with patriarch Mohamed Bin Laden, an illiterate Yemeni bricklayer who established a building company in Saudi Arabia in 1931 and fathered fifty-four children. Charts the path of son Osama. Bestseller. 2008.

The Bitter Road to Freedom: A New History of the Liberation of Europe     DB/RC 68821
18 hours 55 minutes
by William I. Hitchcock
read by Peter Johnson
History of the 1944–1945 liberation of war-torn Europe by the Allied forces in World War II. Uses civilians’ and soldiers’ documents to describe the violence and starvation; the establishment of U.N. relief; and the fate of displaced persons from Eastern Europe, including Jewish concentration-camp survivors. Violence and strong language. 2008.

Champlain’s Dream     DB/RC 68415
36 hours 30 minutes
by David Hackett Fischer
read by Dennis Rooney
Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and author of Washington’s Crossing (RC 58946) chronicles the life and times of French explorer Samuel de Champlain, who founded Quebec in 1608. Portrays the European wars of religion, court life, and colonial exploration. Describes Champlain’s humanist vision for the people of Canada’s First Nations. Violence. 2008.

Chinese Lessons: Five Classmates and the Story of the New China     RC 63667
13 hours 26 minutes
by John Pomfret
read by Jeff Loeb
Washington Post reporter describes his experiences in China, beginning in 1980 as a college exchange student. Chronicles his former classmates’ lives, highlighting changes their country has undergone since Mao’s Cultural Revolution. Argues that a lack of morality and rampant materialism exist amid the social, political, and economic upheavals. Violence. 2006.

The Classical World: An Epic History from Homer to Hadrian    RC 65181
30 hours 37 minutes
by Robin Lane Fox
read by Colleen Delaney
Oxford scholar chronicles nine hundred years of the ancient Greek and Roman empires. Examines topics of gender, slavery, taxes, technology, writing, and culture through literature from the eighth century B.C.E. to the second century C.E. Profiles Pericles, Plato, Socrates, Alexander the Great, Hannibal, and other notables. 2006.

Conquistador: Hernán Cortés, King Montezuma, and the Last Stand of the Aztecs     DB/RC 68382
13 hours 44 minutes
by Buddy Levy
read by Bruce Huntey
Freelance journalist chronicles the Spanish conquest of Mexico that began with the 1519 arrival of Hernán Cortés from Cuba. Details Cortés’s incursion into the Aztec city of Tenochtitlán, where he confined Montezuma and witnessed human sacrifice. Discusses the violent clash and lack of comprehension between the two cultures. Violence. 2008.

Dreams and Shadows: The Future of the Middle East     DB/RC 68842
19 hours 42 minutes
by Robin Wright
read by Peter Ganim
Wright, a veteran reporter covering the Middle East, reflects on thirty years of changes in the Muslim world and ponders a future influenced by technology, demographics, and globalization. Captures opinions from Palestinians, Egyptians, Lebanese, Syrians, Iranians, and Moroccans about their respective countries. Also discusses the U.S. presence in Iraq. 2008.

The Duel: Pakistan on the Flight Path of American Power     DB/RC 68169
12 hours 37 minutes
by Tariq Ali
read by Dennis Rooney
Lahore-born journalist surveys the history of his native land, which became independent Pakistan in 1947. Focuses on the country’s relations with the West and the conflict between Pakistan’s ordinary citizens and its U.S.-backed military and political elite. Discusses the rule of Pervez Musharraf and Benazir Bhutto’s assassination in 2007. 2008.

The Elephant, the Tiger, and the Cell Phone: Reflections on India, the Emerging Twenty-first-Century Power    RC 66390
18 hours 43 minutes
by Shashi Tharoor
read by George Holmes
Former diplomat and author of Nehru (RC 64628) explores the changes that have transformed his country India, a land of contrasts, into a world leader in technology and science. Essays discuss India’s politics, economics, culture, and society. Covers diverse topics such as cricket, saris, ayurveda, astrology, and Bollywood. 2007.

The Far Traveler: Voyages of a Viking Woman    RC 66804
11 hours 13 minutes
by Nancy Marie Brown
read by Catherine Byers
Author traces the life of Gudrid, an eleventh-century Viking woman whose journeys to Greenland, North America, and Europe were recorded in two medieval Icelandic sagas. Draws on archaeological evidence, scientific data, and literary accounts to reconstruct Gudrid’s travels, personal life, and the society in which she lived. 2007.

Fatal Purity: Robespierre and the French Revolution     DB/RC 67460
16 hours 11 minutes
by Ruth Scurr
read by Gabriella Cavallero
Biography of lawyer Maximilien Robespierre (1758–1794), a leader of the French Revolution who became a victim of the Reign of Terror, which he instigated. Posits that Robespierre’s advocacy of the death penalty was psychologically motivated and uses primary sources to document his life. Violence. 2006.

Forgotten Continent: The Battle for Latin America’s Soul     DB/RC 66906
17 hours 54 minutes
by Michael Reid
read by Mark Ashby
Reporter examines the economic and political progress made by Latin American countries from 1980 to 2007. Also chronicles the history of South America since its nineteenth-century struggles for independence from colonial powers. Recommends that the United States provide more-equitable trade deals and greater development aid to Latin America. 2007.

The Great Arab Conquests: How the Spread of Islam Changed the World We Live In     DB/RC 67462
19 hours 17 minutes
by Hugh Kennedy
read by Peter Ganim
Chronicles Arab Muslim conquests in the Middle East, Africa, and Eastern and Western Europe that occurred from 632 C.E., following the death of the prophet Muhammad, to 750 C.E. Interprets early Arabic accounts of the events to describe the battles, settlements, and conversion of the lands and peoples. 2007.

The Great Upheaval: America and the Birth of the Modern World, 1788–1800     DB/RC 66286
33 hours 28 minutes
by Jay Winik
read by Ted Stoddard
Study of the tumultuous period in U.S. history from the adoption of the Constitution to the transfer of power from the Federalists to Thomas Jefferson’s Republicans. Examines the relationship between the American and French revolutions and discusses Russian empress Catherine the Great’s decision to invade the Islamic Ottoman Empire. 2007.

The Horse, the Wheel, and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World     DB/RC 67273
28 hours 32 minutes
by David W. Anthony
read by Ken Kliban
Archaeologist argues that the puzzle of who, where, and when surrounding Proto-Indo-European language origins has been solved. Asserts that linguistic and archaeological clues identify a location—the Eurasian steppes—and that evidence of domesticated horses and wheeled wagons explains early expansion of traditions, commerce, and language. 2007.

The House on Garibaldi Street: The First Full Account of the Capture of Adolf Eichmann, Told by the Former Head of Israel’s Secret Service     DB/RC 67633
11 hours 52 minutes
by Isser Harel
read by Lewis Grenville
Head of Israel’s Mossad from 1952 to 1963 recounts the clandestine operation to capture Nazi leader Adolf Eichmann, who was identified near Buenos Aires by a blind informant. Details the manhunt and Eichmann’s apprehension—without the knowledge of the Argentinean government—and transport to Israel in 1960 to face trial. Some violence. 1975.

Indian Summer: The Secret History of the End of an Empire     DB/RC 67504
19 hours 2 minutes
by Alex Von Tunzelmann
read by Lewis Grenville
Author chronicles India’s independence from Great Britain in 1947, after World War II, and its subsequent partition. Focuses on the political involvement of viceroy Lord Mountbatten and his wife Edwina, pacifist Mohandas Gandhi, and Jawaharlal Nehru, India’s first prime minister. Describes the sectarian violence between Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs. 2007.

Inside Hitler’s High Command    RC 64573
15 hours 53 minutes
by Geoffrey P. Megargee
read by Dan Bloom
Holocaust historian analyzes the evolution, organization, and failings of the Third Reich high command. Argues that flaws of intelligence, logistics, and strategic planning contributed to its defeat. Highlights the competing personalities and agencies within the system and their inability to react to changing circumstances. 2000.

Kim Jong Il’s North Korea     DB/RC 67212
3 hours 59 minutes
by Alison Behnke
read by Margaret Strom
Chronicles the establishment of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea in 1948. Describes life under communist leader Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il. Traces the development of a police state that caused famines, created work camps, and fostered political isolation. For junior and senior high readers. 2008.

The Last Days of the Incas     DB/RC 67382
22 hours 10 minutes
by Kim MacQuarrie
read by Suzanne Toren
Emmy Award-winning filmmaker chronicles the sixteenth-century Spanish conquest of Peru. Describes the arrival of conquistador Francisco Pizarro, the sacking of the Inca capital, the capture of the last Inca emperor, and the end of native resistance. Discusses twentieth-century archaeological discoveries and efforts to reconstruct Inca history. 2007.

Life Laid Bare: The Survivors in Rwanda Speak     DB/RC 67066
7 hours 51 minutes
by Jean Hatzfeld
read by Lisette Lecat
The author of Machete Season (RC 61987) presents fourteen Tutsi survivors’ descriptions of the devastation that took place in their villages of Nyamata and N’tarama during the 1994 Rwandan genocide. A teenager recounts watching Hutus, including a pastor’s son, cut off her mother’s limbs. Violence. 2000.

Napoleon’s Egypt: Invading the Middle East     DB/RC 67222
11 hours 35 minutes
by Juan Cole
read by Mark Ashby
Middle East specialist uses primary sources to chronicle twenty-eight-year-old French general Napoleon Bonaparte’s 1798 invasion of Egypt. Discusses Bonaparte’s goals and the first eight months of the brutal occupation that produced an Islamic insurgency. Covers the long-term cultural and political consequences. Violence. 2007.

Negro with a Hat: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey      DB/RC 67631
23 hours 0 minutes
by Colin Grant
read by Peter Jay Fernandez
The life and times of Jamaican-born Marcus Garvey (1887–1940), a world leader in black civil rights. Chronicles Garvey’s 1914 formation of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), creation of the Black Star steamship line, development of the Back-to-Africa movement, and rivalry with W.E.B. Du Bois. 2008.

The Osama bin Laden I Know: An Oral History of Al Qaeda’s Leader    RC 65312
18 hours 23 minutes
by Peter L. Bergen
read by Peter Johnson
The author of Holy War, Inc. (RC 53623) analyzes how Osama bin Laden became what Bergen considers “the leader of the world’s most deadly terrorist organization.” Interviews more than fifty people who have known bin Laden personally. Advocates capturing him to eliminate his propaganda value and influence. 2006.

Panama Fever: The Epic Story of One of the Greatest Human Achievements of All Time—the Building of the Panama Canal     DB/RC 66585
20 hours 40 minutes
by Matthew Parker
read by Jonathan Davis
History of the engineering feat of constructing the Panama Canal, which was begun by France in the 1880s but completed by the United States in 1914. Highlights the imperial vision behind the canal and the social inequities that befell its labor force. Some violence. 2007.

The Post-American World    RC 66884
9 hours 41 minutes
by Fareed Zakaria
read by Patrick Downer
Author of the The Future of Freedom (RC 56018) posits that, as a result of globalization, countries such as India and China have better economies than the United States does. Decries U.S. geopolitical decline and suggests ways America can become a partner with the rest of the world. Bestseller. 2008.

Return to Dragon Mountain: Memories of a Late Ming Man    RC 66699
8 hours 29 minutes
by Jonathan D. Spence
read by Steven Carpenter
Biographical portrait of Chinese historian Zhang Dai (1597–c. 1680). Describes the arc of his life circumstances, from the luxury he experienced in an elite family to poverty following the Ming dynasty’s disintegration in 1644. Features cultural and political commentary based on Zhang’s memoir and writings. 2007.

The Rise and Fall of the British Empire     DB/RC 66050
30 hours 47 minutes
by Lawrence James
read by David Cutler
A history of British conquest and colonization from the seventeenth century to the twentieth. Covers the Napoleonic, Crimean, Afghan, Indian, Irish, Middle Eastern, and African conflicts and wars in North America with the American colonists and France. Discusses the global impact of a white international mercantile enterprise. 1994.

Robert Mugabe’s Zimbabwe     DB/RC 67218
3 hours 54 minutes
by James R. Arnold and Roberta Wiener
read by Bob Moore
Discusses the South African country formerly known as Rhodesia. Describes the 1980 overthrow of colonial powers by nationalist Robert Mugabe’s use of guerrilla warfare. Details Mugabe’s establishment of a dictatorship that led to economic decline and poor health-care and educational systems. For junior and senior high readers. 2008.

A Shameful Act: The Armenian Genocide and the Question of Turkish Responsibility    RC 64787
16 hours 6 minutes
by Taner Akçam
read by Michael Scherer
Turkish sociologist and historian documents the systematic, state-sponsored genocide of some one million Armenians in 1915. Analyzes the nationalistic and psychological factors behind what he calls Turkey’s “policy of denial” and the international community’s failure to bring the perpetrators to justice. 2006.

Tony Blair    RC 64585
3 hours 16 minutes
by Bonnie Hinman
read by Dan Bloom
Biography of British prime minister and Labour party leader Tony Blair, who was first elected to the post in 1997 after climbing the political ladder. Highlights his struggle against terrorism and his response to the July 7, 2005, Al Qaeda attack on London. For junior and senior high readers. 2007.

The Translator: A Tribesman’s Memoir of Darfur     RC 66803
5 hours 16 minutes
by Daoud Hari
read by Bill Quinn
Memoir of Darfur native who escaped massacre and the burning of his village by Janjaweed militia and became a translator for journalists and United Nations investigators. Reports on refugee-camp survivors and shares their tales of genocide. Highlights the government’s arming of Arab Sudanese against non-Arabs to achieve power. Violence. 2008.

Troublesome Young Men: The Rebels Who Brought Churchill to Power and Helped Save England     DB/RC 67397
15 hours 43 minutes
by Lynne Olson
read by Martha Harmon Pardee
Details the two-year struggle, from 1938 to 1940, of some thirty British Tory dissidents to end Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s appeasement of Hitler. Highlights the actions of Ronald Cartland, Harold Macmillan, Bob Boothby, Harold Nicolson, and their colleagues, who defied their party and prime minister to save their country. 2007.

Twelve Days: The Story of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution    RC 65066
13 hours 44 minutes
by Victor Sebestyen
read by David Cutler
Budapest-born journalist draws on eyewitness accounts and recently released Russian and Hungarian documents to chronicle the Cold War-era uprising of hundreds of thousands of Hungarians against their Soviet occupiers. Blames lack of Western support for the brutal suppression of the rebellion and the country’s subsequent three-decade occupation. 2006.

Untapped: The Scramble for Africa’s Oil    RC 65087
11 hours 13 minutes
by John Ghazvinian
read by Mark Ashby
Historian examines sub-Saharan Africa’s emerging petroleum industry. Recounts his six-month tour in 2005 of twelve countries—including Nigeria, Sudan, Congo, and Angola—to assess the complex logistic, economic, and political challenges of production and the industry’s potential impact on individual nations, the continent, and the global marketplace. 2007.

What Were They Thinking? Really Bad Ideas throughout History    RC 66250
8 hours 58 minutes
by Bruce Felton
read by Kristin Allison
Hundreds of accounts of harebrained schemes, ill-fated ventures, and useless products. Includes a professor’s plan to detonate the moon, a WWII plot to destroy Hitler’s mustache, and a proposal to build a thirty-nine-mile manicotti surrounding Manhattan. Includes other examples from politics, science, pop culture, sports, and crime. 2007.

The Years of Extermination, 1939–1945: Nazi Germany and the Jews, Volume 2     DB/RC 67655
34 hours 29 minutes
by Saul Friedländer
read by Robert Blumenfeld
Second volume of historian’s account of the Holocaust focuses on ideological and cultural factors behind Germany’s extermination policies. Discusses the effect of Nazi institutional dynamics and World War II. Describes experiences of Jews and the passivity of occupied Europe. Sequel to The Years of Persecution (RC 67615). Pulitzer Prize. 2007.

The Years of Persecution, 1933–1939: Nazi Germany and the Jews, Volume 1     DB/RC 67615
18 hours 13 minutes
by Saul Friedländer
read by Robert Blumenfeld
First volume of historian’s account of the Holocaust. Examines the evolution of anti-Semitic policies, the attitudes of the German and European societies in which such policies flourished, and the victims’ plight. Explains Hitler’s ideology and role in the Nazi regime’s anti-Jewish measures, which eventually shifted from persecution to extermination. 1997.

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Posted on 2013-06-28