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NLS: Overseas Outlook

January to June 2008; Volume 31, Number 1

Magazines

During the transition from analog to digital talking books, magazines will continue to be produced on audiocassette. Patrons should retain their four-track cassette players

Requesting books and machines

When ordering books or requesting replacement machines, patrons should send their order forms directly to the overseas librarian. For faster service, fax your order form or request to (202) 707-0712 or e-mail raj@loc.gov. Though substantial delays may result, patrons may also airmail their requests to:

Y. Rathan Raj
National Library Service for the
     Blind and Physically Handicapped
1291 Taylor Street NW
Washington, DC 20542
USA

Book announcements

Books added to the NLS collection over a two-month period are announced in two bimonthly publications. Talking Book Topics, lists recorded books and is available in large print and on cassette. Braille Book Review lists braille books and is available in large print and in braille. Both magazines are also available on diskette and online at www.loc.gov/nls.

If you would like to subscribe to either, please notify the overseas librarian and clearly indicate which magazine and which format you would like to receive. You may also search for books using the NLS online catalog at www.loc.gov/nls.

Minibibliography: African American authors

Each issue of Overseas Outlook includes a bibliography on a subject that may be of interest to NLS patrons. This issue features a minibibliography on African American authors. To receive any of the books in this bibliography, complete the order form at the end of the newsletter and return it to the overseas librarian.

All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes
by Maya Angelou
RC 25432
The American poet, actress, civil rights activist, and television producer-director recalls her pilgrimage to Ghana in the early 1960s. Angelou accompanied her son so he could study at the University of Ghana, and they could get in touch with long-imagined ancestral roots. She is saddened and disillusioned when rejected by native Ghanaians. Sequel to The Heart of a Woman. Some strong language. 1986.

And Still I Rise
by Maya Angelo
RC 12970
A book of verse by a black writer who celebrates life, love, womanhood, and remembrance. 1978.

The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman and Related Readings
by Ernest J. Gaines
RC 64730
A Louisiana ex-slave recounts her life from the end of the Civil War to the mid-twentieth-century civil rights movement. Includes a speech by Sojourner Truth, a short story by Pearl S. Buck, and related memoirs, poems, and essays. Some strong language. 1971.

Bad Boy Brawly Brown: An Easy Rawlins Mystery
by Walter Mosley
RC 54452

Los Angeles, 1964. Easy Rawlins, still mourning the death of his partner Mouse, agrees to help a friend locate his stepson Brawly, who has gotten involved in a radical political group. As Rawlins investigates, he uncovers crooked cops, shady women, robbers, and two murders. Strong language and some violence. Bestseller. 2002.

Beloved
by Toni Morrison
RC 26026
Related in kaleidoscopic fashion and set in rural Ohio during the period immediately following the Civil War, this chronicle of slavery and its aftermath traces the life of Sethe, a former slave. Sethe has a secret in her past so horrific that it has alienated the community, driven off her two sons, isolated her surviving daughter, and threatened her new, loving relationship with Paul D., also a former slave. Bestseller. 1987.

Blacks
by Gwendolyn Brooks
RC 30666
Brooks, the first African-American to win a Pulitzer Prize in poetry (1950), served as Consultant in Poetry for the Library of Congress (1985B86). This collection of her work includes the complete texts of  AA Street in Bronzeville,"Annie Allen,' Maud Martha, "The Bean Eaters, and "In the Mecca," and selections from Primer for Blacks, "Beckonings,"To Disembark,"nd The Near-Johannesburg Boy. 1987.

Bloodchild and Other Stories
by Octavia E. Butler
RC 42749
Short works by the author of Parable of the Sower (RC 39777). The title story, winner of the Hugo and Nebula Awards for science fiction, tells of a horrified man, who, because of love, agrees to carry the devouring eggs and larvae of an extraterrestrial being. The collection includes three other science fiction pieces, a general short story, and two essays. The author, known for her feminist and racial themes, gives tips on getting published. 1995.

Blue Light
by Walter Mosley
RC 47311
San Francisco, 1960s. Needles of blue light penetrate random people, altering their states of being. A biracial grad-school dropout called Chance records these happenings and the effects of subsequent behavior, while the Gray Man (death) exacts his vengeance. Some strong language, some violence, and some descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 1998.

The Bluest Eye
by Toni Morrison
RC 49914
1941. Eleven-year-old Pecola Breedlove—poor, ugly, and black—desperately wants blue eyes, which she thinks would solve all her problems. But instead she is subjected to rejection, violence, and an unwanted pregnancy. Slowly, she begins to descend into madness. Strong language and some explicit descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 1970.

Brothers and Keepers
by John Edgar Wideman
RC 23360
Part autobiography, part biography, this work represents the author's attempt to understand how two disparate lives could have their genesis in the same family and in the same black neighborhood of Pittsburgh. As the author examines his brother, who is serving a life sentence for murder, he also examines himself, a professor and novelist. Strong language and some descriptions of sex. 1984.

The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes
by Arnold Rampersad, editor and David Roessel, associate editor
RC 41265
"What happens to a dream deferred? / Does it dry up / like a raisin in the sun?" asks Langston Hughes in "Harlem [2]," one of 860 poems presented here. Others include "Aesthete in Harlem,"Beaumont to Detroit: 1943," "Blues on a Box," "Easy Boogie," "Prayer Meeting," and "Sunset—Coney Island." Hughes often uses jazz rhythms to share the pain and joy of life in black America from the 1920s to the mid-1960s. The collection is edited by Arnold Rampersad. 1994.

The Color Purple
by Alice Walker
RC 58842
Follows two black sisters: Nettie, a missionary; and Celie, raped by her father and married to a cruel man. Nettie's letters do not reach Celie, and Celie's shame is so great that she writes only to God. Anniversary edition includes Walker's 1992 preface. Strong language and some explicit descriptions of sex. Pulitzer Prize. 1982.

Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography
by Zora Neale Hurston
RC 24273
Self-portrait of one of the major black women artists of the twentieth century who triumphed against great odds to secure an education and capture fame. Glorying in the cultural expression of blackness, Hurston was obsessed with not appearing to complain about the 'condition' of being black. 1984.

Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folktales from the Gulf States
by Zora Neale Hurston
RC 53958
African American folklore that Hurston collected from oral tradition in the late 1920s, published for the first time in 2001. Hurston arranged the material by themes such as god tales, devil tales, witch and haunt, tall tales, neatest trick, mistaken identity, and talking-animal tales. Some strong language. 2001.

The Evidence of Things Not Seen
by James Baldwin
RC 24204
Using the case of Wayne Williams, a black man arrested for the murder of black children in Georgia in 1981, Baldwin covers the whole spectrum of contemporary American life. His primary focus, however, is on the continuing problems of blacks in white America. 1985.

Fatheralong: A Meditation on Fathers and Sons, Race, and Society
by John Edgar Wideman
RC 40624
Six essays examining strained father-son relationships in terms of social issues about race and family. Wideman, an award-winning novelist who wrote about his brother and himself in Brothers and Keepers (RC 23360), here combines a memoir of his father with observations about African American life. Some strong language. 1994.

Fearless Jones
by Walter Mosley
RC 52362
Watts, 1954. African American bookstore owner Paris Minton calls on his friend, Fearless Jones, when he gets entangled in a case of stolen Swiss bonds. The two try to protect an elderly Jewish couple but get in over their heads. Strong language, violence, and some descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 2001.

Fever: Twelve Stories
by John Edgar Wideman
RC 35220
In the title story, an African American nurse-undertaker narrates the catastrophe of a yellow-fever epidemic in eighteenth-century Philadelphia. Two stories are about a jazz player and a bluesman. Several return to Wideman's Pittsburgh neighborhood, each using the fever metaphor to depict suffering in many forms. Strong language and some explicit descriptions of sex. 1989.

Fledgling
by Octavia E. Butler
RC 62744
Shori Matthews, a juvenile vampire who resembles a young girl, awakens injured and with amnesia. Drawn to a burned-out enclave, she learns her identity as the sole survivor of a massacre and sets out after the killers. Some strong language, some violence, and some explicit descriptions of sex. 2005.

Flying Home and Other Stories
by Ralph Ellison
RC 43853
Thirteen short stories, some never before published, written by the award-winning African American author between 1937 and 1954. AIn a Strange Country' features an African American sailor who envies a spirit among the Welsh people that he does not experience back home. Transients encounter railyard thugs in 'Hymie's Bull.' Strong language and some descriptions of sex. 1996.

Gather Together in My Name
by Maya Angelou
RC 56481
A continuation of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (RC 24959), this memoir begins at the end of World War II. Angelou recalls being an unwed mother at seventeen and becoming a prostitute for an older man who deceived her. Some strong language and some descriptions of sex. 1974.

Go Tell It on the Mountain
by James Baldwin
RC 33488
While living in Harlem, John experiences a religious conversion on his fourteenth birthday. Flashbacks portray the lives, suffering, and sins of John's African American forefathers, especially their struggles with racism and poverty as they moved from the rural South to this northern ghetto. 1985.

Gone Fishin: An Easy Rawlins Novel
by Walter Mosley
RC 43412
Prequel to Devil in a Blue Dress (RC 32935). In 1939, Easy Rawlins and Mouse are two young men on a reckless road trip to wring money out of Mouse's loathsome stepfather. Their path to manhood is crossed by violence, lust, and tragedy. Strong language, violence, and descriptions of sex. Bestseller. 1997.

The Heart of a Woman
by Maya Angelou
RC 17325
The author continues her autobiography into the early 1960sCa period during which Angelou was heavily involved in civil rights. Includes her recollections of such black activists as Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and James Baldwin, and recounts the details of her affair with South African freedom fighter Make. Sequel to Singin' and Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like Christmas (RC 56941). Strong language. Bestseller. 1981.

A Hungry Heart: A Memoir
by Gordon Parks
RC 62034
African American artist Parks (1912B2006) continues reminiscing about his life after Voices in the Mirror (RC 33413). Chronicles his career that includes work as a fashion photographer, photojournalist, author, film director, and composer. Discusses his several marriages and numerous children. Strong language and some violence. 2005.

I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
by Maya Angelou
RC 57200
Memoir by renowned African American poet and college professor Angelou. Describes her childhood and adolescent years in rural Arkansas, in St. Louis, and in San Francisco, and the racial and gender hardships she endured. 1969.

If Beale Street Could Talk
by James Baldwin
RC 58492
Nineteen-year-old African American Tish Rivers and her lover, Fonny, met on the streets as children. Now Tish is pregnant with their child and remains hopeful, while Fonny, an artisan wrongly accused of rape, awaits trial in jail. Strong language and some explicit descriptions of sex. 1974.

Invisible Man
by Ralph Ellison
RC 56346
A young black man's search for identity. Follows the unnamed protagonist from his youth in a Southern town through the depression years in Harlem, where he examines and rejects the values thrust on him by both whites and blacks. Some strong language. National Book Award, 1953. 1947.

Jonah's Gourd Vine
by Zora Neale Hurston
RC 33181
Hurston, a Harlem Renaissance novelist, folklorist, and anthropologist, paints a sympathetic portrait of a philandering preacher, John Buddy Pearson. Lucy, John's long-suffering wife, is his true love, but there are a host of other women who vie for his attention, cater to his lusts, and lead to his ultimate downfall. 1990.

The Men of Brewster Place
by Gloria Naylor
RC 48779
In this companion to The Women of Brewster Place (RC 25314), African American men who live in the tenement describe their lives and daily frustrations trying to make a living while coping with their women and children. Strong language. 1998.

Moses: Man of the Mountain
by Zora Neale Hurston
RC 24396
Written in black dialect and colloquial English, this novel, based on an adaptation of the biblical account of the life of Moses emphasizes Moses, as the magician and the emancipator of the Hebrew slaves, and features other aspects of the Moses legend which have appealed to African Americans. 1984.

Mother Love Poems
by Rita Dove
RC 41331
The 1993B1995 U.S. poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner collects poems previously published elsewhere into a volume focusing on the myth of Demeter and Persephone. Loosely following the sonnet form, the poems express a mother's anxious care for her daughter and a daughter's experience in leaving her mother for the wider—and more dangerous—world. 1995.

On the Pulse of Morning
by Maya Angelou
RC 36169
The inaugural poem created and read by noted African American poet Maya Angelou for President William Jefferson Clinton on January 20, 1993. She speaks of a rock, a river, and a tree as symbols of a land once inhabited by now-extinct species and the messages that these symbols deliver through the ages is that each dawn brings new hope, especially the morning whose pulse can be felt on 'this fine day.' Bestseller. 1993.

Report from Part One
by Gwendolyn Brooks
RC 47475
Autobiographical writings by and interviews with the poet laureate (born 1917). Describes her childhood, marriage, family, and career. Discusses her awareness of her racial heritage and her role as an African American poet. Includes an appendix of personal entries. 1972.

Report from Part Two
by Gwendolyn Brooks
RC 48088
Essays and poems about the events, people, and travel that were important to Brooks. In 'Keziah,' she pays loving tribute to her mother. Continuation of themes found in Report from Part One (RC 47475) (BR 11948). 1996.

Short Stories of Langston Hughes
by Langston Hughes
RC 43646
Forty-seven short stories by the noted African American author, written between 1919 and 1963. Arranged in chronological order, tales include those previously uncollected, such as those written while in high school and other early works published in African American journals. Some strong language. 1996.

A Song Flung Up to Heaven
by Maya Angelou
RC 54044
In this sixth volume of her memoirs, Angelou documents her life in the 1960s when she returned to America from Ghana to participate in the civil rights movement. Discusses the impact of the assassinations of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. on her, personally and professionally. Bestseller. 2002.

Sula
by Toni Morrison
RC 54438
In Medallion, Ohio, African American girls Sula and Nel grow up in the Bottom during the 1920s and 1930s. Nel follows the traditional route of marriage and children, while Sula ventures out into the world. Traces their friendship and estrangement through the years. Some strong language and explicit descriptions of sex. 1973.

The Women of Brewster Place
by Gloria Naylor
RC 25314
Seven women live on Brewster Place—and each has a story that is unique, but also involves the concerns of the others—and of women everywhere. A commentary on the experience of black women in the United States. 1982.

Order Form

Y. Rathan Raj
National Library Service for the
     Blind and Physically Handicapped
1291 Taylor Street NW
Washington, DC 20542
USA
Fax: (202) 707-0712

Your Name___________________________________________________

____RC 25432      All God's Children Need Traveling Shoes
____RC 12970      And Still I Rise
____RC 64730      The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman and Related Readings
____RC 54452      Bad Boy Brawly Brown: An Easy Rawlins Mystery
____RC 26026      Beloved
____RC 30666      Blacks
____RC 42749      Bloodchild and Other Stories
____RC 47311       Blue Light
____RC 49914      The Bluest Eye
____RC 23360      Brothers and Keepers
____RC 41265      The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes
____RC 58842      The Color Purple
____RC 24273      Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography
____RC 53958      Every Tongue Got to Confess: Negro Folktales from the Gulf States
____RC 24204      The Evidence of Things Not Seen
____RC 40624      Fatheralong: A Meditation on Fathers and Sons, Race and Society
____RC 52362      Fearless Jones
____RC 35220      Fever: Twelve Stories
____RC 62744      Fledgling
____RC 43853      Flying Home and Other Stories
____RC 56481      Gather Together in My Name
____RC 33488      Go Tell It on the Mountain
____RC 43412      Gone Fishin: An Easy Rawlins Novel
____RC 17325      The Heart of a Woman
____RC 62034      A Hungry Heart: A Memoir
____RC 57200      I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
____RC 58492      If Beale Street Could Talk
____RC 56346      Invisible Man
____RC 33181       Jonah's Gourd Vine
____RC 48779      The Men of Brewster Place
____RC 24396      Moses: Man of the Mountain
____RC 41331       Mother Love Poems
____RC 36169      On the Pulse of Morning
____RC 47475      Report from Part One
____RC 48088      Report from Part Two
____RC 43646      Short Stories of Langston Hughes
____RC 54044      A Song Flung Up to Heaven
____RC 54438      Sula
____RC 25314      The Women of Brewster Place

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Posted on 2010-10-13