Assistive Devices for Use with Personal Computers

NLS Reference Circulars

Assistive Devices for Use with Personal Computers October 2001

Introduction

The devices listed in this reference circular are designed to assist people who have visual or physical disabilities to access information displayed on a computer screen. The information includes screen magnifiers, screen readers, web browsers, and other devices that convert print into synthetic speech or braille. Section I lists available products, Section II gives the addresses and telephone numbers of the producers and vendors, and Sections III and IV are a selective list of books and journal articles that evaluate specific devices and selective Internet resources. Because prices are subject to change without notice, contact companies directly to verify current prices and product specifications.

Items listed in this reference circular are not part of the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped program, and their listing does not imply endorsement.

Contents

Screen Magnifiers
Screen Readers
Speech Synthesizers
Software for Web Access
Braille Interface and Displays
Addresses of Sources
Selective Bibliography, 1998-2001
Selective Internet Resources on Assistive Technology

Screen Magnifiers

Screen magnifiers display the information on a computer screen in a variety of magnifications and fonts. They may be software or hardware based. The software programs are compatible with many word-processing, database, and spreadsheet applications. The hardware is available in several models that are compatible with most computers.

Hardware

Compu-Lenz (Florida New Concepts)
Uses a Fresnel lens to enlarge character size up to 4x and reduces glare on the screen. Attaches to a personal computer.
Computer Magnifier Screen
Enlarges the information by fifty percent. Is designed to cut glare and reflection.
Computer Screen Enlarger
Is an adjustable free-standing unit that fits 12" to 16" monitors and magnifies up to 2x.
Computer Screen Magnifier
Hangs on top of a 14" to 17" or 17" to 19" monitor to magnify up to 2x.
Computer Screen Magnifier
Attaches with a self-adhesive strip to computer monitors with 12" to 15" screens. Enlarges images up to 50 percent.
EZ Magnifier (Less Gauss)
Has approximately 2x magnification. Attaches to a monitor up to 17" with Velcro or Bungee.
Japanese 2x Computer Screen Enlarger
Has weighted stand with rubber base and adjustable lens to magnify 2x.
Japanese Fresnel Stand Magnifier
Sits in front of a computer screen to magnify 2x.
Magic Window Magnifier
Works on monitors up to 21" to magnify up to 3x.
Magni-Filter
Enlarges characters 2x. Fits laptop and 12" to 21" screen; price varies according to screen size. Has contour frame with tempered glass and is designed to cut glare.
NuVu GNK Magnifier (Less Gauss)
Provides up to 3x magnification on monitors from 12" to 19". Lens is mounted on an oak base.
NuVu Screen Magnifier (Less Gauss)
Magnifies approximately 2x and is adjustable. Fits monitors up to 17".
Reizen Panel Magnifier
Fits 14" to 15" and 17" to 19" monitors. Magnifies approximately 2x.
WYNIWYG Laptop Visual Enhancement System (Less Gauss)
Magnifies 2.2x and fits over a monitor to reduce glare.

Software

Artic MAGNUM
Enlarges Windows 95 or 98 from 1x to 32x, enlarges DOS text from 1x to 8x.
BigShot Magnifier (Ai Squared)
Has twenty levels of magnification from 105 percent to 200 percent. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.aisquared.com>.
GALILEO (Baum)
Is an independent program, but was developed especially for use with Baum's Virgo NT. Magnifies from 1x to 48x. Is compatible with any video card and any sound card. Can be used with or without speech.
inLARGE (ALVA Access Group)
Magnifies the entire screen of a Macintosh or a portion of text or graphics 2x to 16x. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.aagi.com/ aagi/download.asp?inlarge_demo.hqx>.
L&H MagniReader
Combines optical character recognition and speech. Scans a document into a computer and displays an image of the scanned page at different levels of magnification, highlighting text as it is spoken.
LP-DOS and LP-Windows
Has DOS version to magnify text programs such as WordPerfect and Lotus 1-2- 3 and Windows version for Windows 3.1 and 95. Magnifies up to 16x.
Lunar (Dolphin)
Works with Windows 95/98/Me or Windows 9x/Me/NT2000 to magnify 2x to 32x. Provides viewing modes to full screen, split screen, window, or lens. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.dolphinusa.com>.
Lunar Plus (Dolphin)
Works with Windows 95/98/Me or Windows 9x/Me/NT2000 to magnify 2x to 32x. Provides viewing modes to full screen, split screen, window, or lens. Includes the multilingual Orpheus software speech synthesizer. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.dolphinusa.com>.
MAGic (Freedom Scientific)
Magnifies 2x to 16x in LP Windows. Uses magnification and speech together or independently. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.freedomscientific.com/fs_downloads/magic.asp>.
MAGic NT (Freedom Scientific)
Makes the MAGic for Windows features available for Windows NT/2000 platform.
MAGNUM
See: Artic MAGNUM
ProVision32 (Biolink)
Works in Windows NT. Magnifies from 2x to 16x.
VisAbility (Ai Squared)
Magnifies 1x to 32x and prints at magnifications up to 8x. Can display the image full screen or in a window. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.aisquared.com>.
ZoomText and ZoomText Xtra (Ai Squared)
Available in a DOS and Windows version that magnifies from 2x to 16x in a variety of fonts. ZoomText Xtra includes a software-generated speech module called DocReader. Available to download in a trial version at <http:// www.aisquared.com>.

Screen Readers

Screen readers are software packages that interact with refreshable braille displays or speech synthesizers. They enable individuals who are blind or visually impaired to access the information on the computer screen either through braille or by voice output. Most of the readers can be used with a range of commercially available text-to-speech synthesizers. Some can also be used with Sound Blaster compatible sound cards.

AppleWorks Companion (RC Systems)
Modifies AppleWorks Startup software by adding speech and new function commands. Requires the DoubleTalk or Slotbuster II speech synthesizer option and AppleWorks 2.0 or higher.
Artic Business Vision
Provides access to DOS programs. Processes all keyboard input and screen output into speech and is interactive with spreadsheet programs. Consists of a speech board and screen access software.
Artic WinVision97
Requires 486 PC and Windows 95 or 98 operating system. Works with most speech synthesizers. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www. artictech.com/whywv97.htm#top>.
ASAP and ASAW (MicroTalk)
Has two versions: Automatic Screen Access Program (ASAP) for DOS computers and Automatic Screen Access for Windows (ASAW) for Windows 3.1, 95, and Windows for Workgroups. Determines the appropriate text to speak by analyzing information in the display memory and responding to user input commands. Available to download in a trial or update version at <http://www.microtalk.com>.
Hal Screen Reader (Dolphin)
Works with Windows 95/98/Me or Windows 9x/Me/NT2000. Supports speech and a number of refreshable braille displays. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.dolphinusa.com>.
JAWS (Job Access With Speech) (Freedom Scientific)
Supports standard Windows applications and Internet Explorer. Uses an integrated voice synthesizer and the computer's sound card for voice output. Provides output to refreshable braille displays in computer or grade 2 braille. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.freedomscientific. com/fs_downloads/jaws.asp>.
outSPOKEN (ALVA Access Group)
Has two versions: Windows converts the graphics and text of Microsoft Windows 95 to a full speech and audio interface; Macintosh uses a built-in speech synthesizer. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www. aagi.com/aagi/outspoken_products.asp>.
Protalk32 (Biolink)
Has two versions: one provides access to Windows 3.1, 3.11, or 95, the other to Windows NT 3.5 or newer. Supports braille and/or speech.
SCAT (Screen Articulator) (RC Systems)
For the Apple II. Requires Slotbuster II multifunction card with speech synthesizer option or DoubleTalk speech synthesizer card.
Simply Talker
Requires 486 or better IBM compatible, Windows 95/98, and Internet Explorer 3.02 or higher. Reads Microsoft-compatible applications. Available to purchase or to download in a trial or upgrade version at <http://www. econointl.com>.
Supernova (Dolphin)
Works with Windows 95/98/Me or Windows 9x/Me/NT2000 to magnify 2x to 32x. Provides viewing modes to full screen, split screen, Window, or lens. Supports speech and refreshable braille displays. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.dolphinusa.com>.
VIRGO (Baum)
Has two versions: 2.x is compatible with Windows 95/98 and VIRGO NT is for Windows NT4. Supports braille displays and speech products.
Vocal-Eyes and Window-Eyes (GW Micro)
Vocal-Eyes runs on IBM and IBM-compatible computers and can be used with commercially available voice synthesizer. Window-Eyes, which has a demo at <http://www.gwmicro.com>, incorporates the design of Vocal-Eyes to work with Windows 95 and 98.
Window Bridge 2000 (Syntha-voice Computers)
Is a full 32-bit Windows application that supports all video resolutions. Includes Microsoft speech and supports a variety of hardware synthesizers, software speech products, and braille displays. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.synthavoice.com/downloads.htm>.

Speech Synthesizers

Speech synthesizers provide voice output of the information on a computer screen, converting standard ASCII text into intelligible speech. When used with screen access programs, speech synthesizers allow users to access any portion of the screen's information. Synthesizers may be either internal or external and can be used with a variety of screen-reader software programs.

Different synthesizers are compatible with different computers, feature male and female voices with adjustable tone and speed, and may speak in foreign languages.

Arctic Spirit
Uses an RS-232 port with standard connector and a phoneme speech synthesis chip. Is TransPort-command compatible.
Artic TransType 2000/2000X
Is an ASCII notetaker with a TransPort synthesizer. Has standard RS-232 port with DB-9 connector.
DECtalk
Offers pre-defined voices and adjustable speaking rates for slow spelling to fast scanning. Has controls for pauses, pitch, and syllable accents. DECtalk Express is a portable, external synthesizer that plugs into a serial port. DEC Access 32 software uses the computer system's sound card for speech output.
DoubleTalk LT and DoubleTalk PC (RC Systems)
Has two versions: LT needs an external serial port connection to an Apple II Macintosh, PC, or laptop. PC is a half-size plug-in card compatible with the PC/XT/AT, PS2 models 25 and 30. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.rcsys.com/dnlds.htm>.
Keynote GOLD Multimedia Software
Designed to run in Windows 3.1, 3.11, or Windows 95/98. Requires a sixteen- bit Windows-compatible sound card.
LiteTalk (MicroTalk)
Connects to a computer through the serial or parallel port. Has built-in speaker, internal rechargeable batteries, and is portable.
MultiVoice
A battery-operated version of DECtalk that attaches through a standard RS-232 port. Ten voices (male, female, child, and custom) are available.
PortSpeak (Portset Systems Ltd.)
Uses GRABS (Grammatical Read Ahead Before Speaking) technology to read the text in advance of speaking to know the correct sound to send to the sound card. Operates in a Windows 32-bit environment such as Windows 95/98 or NT. Allows a range of voices for multiple languages.
Slotbuster II (RC Systems)
Multifunction interface card. Compatible with the Apple II, II Plus, IIe, and IIGS. Must be ordered with one or more of the following: voice option ($39), parallel printer port ($15), serial printer port ($12), modem port ($21).
Sound Blaster
Multimedia sound card with DEC Access for speech synthesis. Can connect to a CD-ROM drive to listen to audio CDs and to music on the Internet.
Spirit
See: Arctic Spirit
TransType 2000/2000X
See: Artic TransType 2000/2000X
Triple Talk PCI (Access Solutions)
Fits into any PCI slot. Comes with an external speaker with volume, headphone jack, and necessary software. Works in a Windows and DOS box with all screen readers. Available to download in a trial version at <http:// www.axsol.com/dlpci.html>.
Triple Talk USB (Access Solutions)
Attaches to USB and older ports. Comes with AC adapter, built-in speaker, rechargeable battery, and all software. Works in a Windows and DOS box with all screen readers. Available to download in a trial version at <http:// www.axsol.com/dlusb.html>.

Software for Web Access

BrookesTalk (Oxford Brookes University)
Provides keyboard accessibility using the function keys and a configurable large text window. Can download a self-extracting archive or request a CD at <http://www.brookes.ac.uk/schools/cms/research/speech/request.htm>.
Connect Outloud (Freedom Scientific)
Offers speech and braille output of the Internet, e-mail, and Windows operating system applications. Available to download in a trial version at <http://www.freedomscientific.com/fs_downloads/connect.asp>.
Fast Browser (Qwerks.com Inc.)
Requires a personal computer that has a Windows 95, 98, ME, 2000, or NT platform and Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 4 or above. Available to purchase or to download in a trial or update version at <http://www. fastbrowser.net>.
Home Page Reader (IBM)
Provides an interface for navigating and manipulating web-page elements using the capabilities of IBM's ViaVoice Outloud text-to-speech synthesizer. Available to purchase or to download in a trial or upgrade version at <http:// www-3.ibm.com/able/hpr2.html#download>.
MultiMail E-Mail Program
Has a range of interface and user options and word prediction. Available to download free at <http://www.deakin.edu.au/mis/multiweb/mmindex.htm>.
MultiWeb Internet Browser
Features various interfaces designed to work with input devices, including mouse, keyboard, and touch screen, and options such as large print, highlight text, and speech synthesis. Available to download free at <http://www.deakin.edu.au/mis/multiweb/mwlndex.htm>.
Simply Web 2000
Uses Internet Explorer 4.01 or later. Available to download the current release free at <http://www.econointl.com/sw>.
VIP Browser (JBliss)
Converts text from web pages into visual and speech displays that can be customized to a user's needs.
WebWizard
Uses the information of the MS Internet Explorer 5.x and runs with any screen reading software. Available to purchase or to download in a trial version at <http://www.baum.de/English/webwizard.htm>.
WeMedia Talking Browser
Requires a personal computer that has a Windows 95, 98, ME, 2000, or NT platform and Microsoft Internet Explorer, version 4 or above. Available to download version 1 free at <http://www.wemedia.com>.

Braille Interface and Displays

Braille displays provide braille access to the information on a computer screen by converting standard ASCII text into braille. In response to information from the computer, braille is produced on the display by pins that are raised and lowered (refreshed) in combinations to form braille characters. When used with screen access programs, braille displays allow users to access any portion of the screen information. They are commonly available in twenty-, forty-, or eighty- character braille-cell configurations of six or eight dots each. Some displays are portable and battery-powered.

ALVA Braille Terminal (ABT)
Runs with MS-DOS, IBM OS/2, Windows 95/98, Windows NT, and UNIX. Comes in different models: a portable, battery-operated model with forty-three braille cells and a desktop version with either forty-five or eighty-five braille cells. Have extra status cells so one hand can monitor status information and attributes and the other hand can read the text on the display.
ALVA Delphi series
Consists of three models: ALVA Delphi 440 is portable and has forty-three cells (three status cells); ALVA Delphi 440D desktop model has forty-five cells (five status cells); and ALVA Delphi 480 desktop model has eighty-five cells (five status cells).
ALVA Satellite series
Comes in two models: ALVA 544 Satellite is portable with forty-four braille cells, four navigation front keys, and ten replaceable and rechargeable penlight batteries; ALVA 570 Satellite Pro has seventy braille cells and six navigation front keys.
Braille Lite
Comes in two models: M20 has a twenty-cell, refreshable eight-dot braille display and M40 has a forty-cell, refreshable eight-dot braille display. Both feature built-in 56K baud modem, internal speech synthesizer, and POP 3 e-mail capabilities.
Braille Voyager (HumanWare)
Has a USB port and a macro program called Tieman Express to control the computer from the display regardless of the compatible screen reader being used. Gives the user eight command keys logically configured as braille writing keys.
Braille Wave (Handy Tech)
Features include forty concave braille cells with routing keys, status cells that can be switched on according to requirements, serial port, and three-hour charging time. Can run twenty hours on a battery.
Braille Window (HumanWare)
Has two models: a portable model with forty-five eight-dot cells and a desktop model with eighty-five eight-dot cells. Both models allow users to navigate Windows 95/98, NT, 3.11, or DOS.
BRAILLEX (Papenmeier)
Offers two-dimensional displays that show the structure of the computer screen for users who are visually impaired. Works with screen reader programs. Available in different models: EL 40p has forty cells with integrated cursor routing keys; EL 2D-40 has forty cells and a thirteen-cell vertical display; EL 2D-66 has sixty-six cells and a thirteen-cell vertical display; EL 2D-80 has eighty cells and a twenty-cell vertical display; EL-80 offers eighty cells with two status cells; and Tiny has forty cells.
DM 80 plus (Baum)
Has eighty braille cells, four status cells, and optional speech output. Includes serial and parallel interfaces and the option of installing a special interface card.
Liber Braille Display (VisuAide)
Gives access to a forty-character window on the computer screen. Offers a complete range of screen-review commands.
Mod 80
Has modules for braille display with eighty-four, forty-four, or twenty-four braille elements; a braille keyboard; and a sixteen-key function pad or speech module that can be combined to create a personal system.
PowerBraille
Comes in different versions: PowerBraille 40 is a forty-character, eight-dot display for PB40 notebook or desktop computers; PowerBraille 65 is a sixty- five-character, eight-dot braille display for desktop computers; and PowerBraille 80 is an eighty-one-character, eight-dot braille display for desktop computers.
RBT40 Refreshable Braille Terminal
Has forty cells with tactile function switches for movement of the cursor and six function keys for commands.
SuperBraille (Advanced Access Devices)
Has a built-in forty-cell, eight-dot braille display that supports up to forty-four cells. Comes pre-installed with MS-DOS and Windows operating software.
Vario (Baum)
Can be used with a PC-laptop or -desktop system. Works with Windows-based software packages. Comes in a forty-cell and eighty-cell version.

Addresses of Sources

AccessAbility, Inc.
4000 Geary Boulevard
San Francisco, CA 94118
(415) 751-6455
888-322-7200
(415) 751-5262 fax
info@4access.com
http://www.4access.com
Access Solutions
26655 Gading Road, Suite 23
Hayward, CA 94544
(916) 481-3559
(916) 482-2250 fax
info@axsol.com
http://www.axsol.com
Adaptive Technology Consulting, Inc.
P.O. Box 778
Amesbury, MA 01913
(978) 462-3817
(978) 462-3928 fax
gyarnall@adaptivetech.net
http://www.adaptivetech.net
Advanced Access Devices
2066-C Walsh Avenue
Santa Clara, CA 95050
(408) 970-9760
(408) 727-9351 fax
inquiry@aadbrl.com
www.aadbrl.com
Ai Squared
P.O. Box 669
Manchester Center, VT 05255
(802) 362-3612
(802) 362-1670 fax
sales@aisquared.com
http://www.aisquared.com
ALVA Access Group, Inc.
436 14th Street, Suite 700
Oakland, CA 94612
(510) 451-2582 (ALVA)
888-318-2582 (ALVA)
(510) 451-0879 TTY
(510) 451-0878 fax
info@aagi.com
http://www.aagi.com/aagi/aagi_home.html
Ann Morris Enterprises, Inc.
551 Hosner Mountain Road
Stormville, NY 12582
(845) 227-9659
800-454-3175
(845) 226-2793 fax
annmor@webspan.net
http://www.annmorris.com
Arkenstone, Inc.
See: Freedom Scientific
Artic Technologies
55 Park Street
Troy, MI 48083
(248) 588-7370
(248) 588-2650 fax
info@artictech.com
http://www.artictech.com
Assistive Technology, Inc.
7 Wells Avenue
Newton, MA 02459
(617) 641-9000
800-793-9227
(617) 641-9191 fax
customercare@assistivetech.com
http://www.assistivetech.com
Bartimaeus Group
1481 Chain Bridge Road, Suite 100
McLean, VA 22101
(703) 442-5023
(703) 734-8381
adapt2c@bartsite.com
http://www.bartsite.com
Baum Retec AG
Schloss Langenzell
69257 Wiesenbach
GERMANY
49-6223-4909-0
49-6223-4909-99 fax
info@baum.de
http://www.baum.de
Biolink Computer Research and Development Ltd.
4770 Glenwood Avenue
North Vancouver, British Columbia
CANADA V7R 4G8
(604) 984-4099
(604) 985-8493 fax
sales@biolink.bc.ca
http://www.biolink.bc.ca/index.html
Blazie Engineering
See: Freedom Scientific
Bossert Specialties, Inc.
P.O. Box 15441
Phoenix, AZ 85060
(602) 956-6637
800-776-5885
(602) 956-1008 fax
magnify@wemagnify.com
http://www.wemagnify.com
C Tech
2 North William Street
Pearl River, NY 10965-9998
(845) 735-7907
800-228-7798 (in NY and NJ)
(845) 735-0513 fax
info@lowvisionproducts.com
http://www.lowvisionproducts.com
Carolyn's Low Vision Solutions
1415 57th Avenue West
Bradenton, FL 34207
(941) 739-5555
800-648-2266
(941) 739-5503 fax
carolynscatalog@aol.com
http://www.carolynscatalog.com
Dolphin Computer Access LLC
60 East Third Avenue, Suite 130
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650) 348-7401
866-797-5921
(650) 348-7403 fax
sales@dolphinusa.com
http://www.dolphinusa.com
EconoNet International, Inc.
11404 Lakeview Drive
Coral Springs, FL 33071
(954) 345-0213
ammirata@econointl.com
http://www.econointl.com
Electronic Visual Aid Specialists
P.O. Box 371
Westerly, RI 02891
(401) 596-3155
800-872-3827
(401) 596-3979 fax
inforequest@evas.com
http://www.evas.com
Enabling Technologies Company
1601 Northeast Braille Place
Jensen Beach, FL 34957
(561) 225-3687
800-777-3687
(561) 225-3299 fax
800-950-3687 fax
enabling@brailler.com
http://www.brailler.com
Florida New Concepts Marketing
P.O. Box 261
Port Richey, FL 34673-0261
(727) 842-3231
(727) 845-7544 fax
compulnz@gte.net
http://gulfside.com/compulenz/
Freedom Scientific
Blind/Low Vision Group
11800 31st Court North
St. Petersburg, FL 33716
(727) 803-8000
800-444-4443
(727) 803-8001 fax
info@hj.com
http://www.freedomscientific.com
GW Micro, Inc.
725 Airport North Office Park
Fort Wayne, IN 46825
(219) 489-3671
(219) 489-2608 fax
support@gwmicro.com
http://www.gwmicro.com
Henter-Joyce, Inc.
See: Freedom Scientific
HumanWare, Inc.
6245 King Road
Loomis, CA 95650
(916) 652-7253
800-722-3393
(916) 652-7296 fax
info@humanware.com
http://www.humanware.com
Independent Living Aids, Inc.
200 Robbins Lane
Jericho, NY 11753-2341
(516) 752-8080
800-537-2118
(516) 501-6948 TTY
(516) 752-3135 fax
can-do@independentliving.com
http://www.independentliving.com
IBM Accessibility Center
11400 Burnet Road
IMAD-9448
Austin, TX 78758
800-426-4832
(512) 838-9367 fax
800-426-4833 TTY
snsinfo@us.ibm.com
http://www-3.ibm.com/able/
JBliss Imaging Systems
100 West El Camino Real, Suite 68
Mountain View, CA 94040
(650) 940-4115
888-452-5477
(650) 903-4136 fax
info@jbliss.com
http://www.jbliss.com
Keyboard Alternatives and Vision
Solutions, Inc.
537 College Avenue
Santa Rosa, CA 95404
(707) 544-8000
800-953-9262
(707) 522-1343 fax
keyalt@keyalt.com
http://www.keyalt.com/index.html
Less Gauss, Inc.
P.O. Box 2019
Hyde Park, NY 12538
(845) 229-1700
877-828-4817
(845) 229-1715 fax
lessgauss@aol.com
http://www.lessgauss.com
LS&S Group
P.O. Box 673
Northbrook, IL 60065
(847) 498-9777
800-468-4789
800-317-8533 TTY
(847) 498-1482 fax
lssgrp@aol.com
http://www.lssgroup.com
Maxi-Aids
42 Executive Boulevard
P.O. Box 3209
Farmingdale, NY 11735
(631) 752-0521
800-522-6294
(631) 752-0689 fax
(631) 752-0738 TTY
sales@maxiaids.com
http://www.maxiaids.com
MicroTalk
203 Pleasantview Avenue
Louisville, KY 40206
(502) 897-5789
(502) 721-6083 fax
Larry@screenaccess.com
http://www.microtalk.com
Missing Link Technologies
See: AccessAbility, Inc.
Optelec
6 Lyberty Way
Westford, MA 01886
(978) 392-0707
800-766-7796
800-958-3399 fax
magcenter@optelec.com
http://www.optelec.com
Personal Data Systems, Inc.
100 West Rincon Avenue
Suite #103
Campbell, CA 95008
(408) 866-1126
(408) 866-1128 fax
info@personaldatasystems.com
http://www.personaldatasystems.com
RC Systems, Inc.
1609 England Avenue
Everett, WA 98203
(425) 355-3800
(425) 355-1098 fax
info@rcsys.com
http://www.rcsys.com
Sammons Preston
P.O. Box 5071
Bolingbrook, IL 60440-5071
800-323-5547
800-547-4333 fax
800-325-1745 TTY
sp@sammonspreston.com
http://www.sammonspreston.com
Sighted Electronics
69 Woodland Avenue
Westwood, NJ 07675
(201) 666-2221
800-666-4883
(201) 666-0159 fax
sighted@idt.net
http://www.sighted.com
Syntha-voice Computers, Inc.
304-800 Queenston Road
Stoney Creek, Ontario
CANADA L8G 1A7
(905) 662-0565
800-263-4540
(905) 662-0568 fax
help@synthavoice.com
http://www.synthavoice.com
Technologies for the Visually Impaired, Inc.
9 Nolan Court
Hauppauge, NY 11788
(631) 724-4479 telephone and fax
contact@tvi-web.com
http://www.tvi-web.com
VisuAide, Inc.
841, Boulevard Jean-Paul-Vincent
Longueuil, Quebec
CANADA J4G 1R3
(514) 463-1717
(514) 463-0120 fax
info@visuaide.com
http://www.visuaide.com

Selective Bibliography, 1998-2001

General

AFB National Technology Program. Sources of Windows-based tutorials.
Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://www.afb.org/info_document_view. asp?documentid=1530>.
Cannon, Pat. "Access to electronic and information technology: evolving federal standards for nonvisual use."
Braille monitor, v. 43, Jan. 2000: 51-55.
Closing the Gap. "Resource directory: a guide to the latest computer-related products for children and adults with special needs."
Closing the Gap, v. 19, Feb.-Mar. 2001: 1-173 (entire issue).
Chong, Curtis. "The current state of technology for the blind and the challenge of the twenty-first century."
Braille monitor, v. 43, Jan. 2000: 24-30.
Chong, Curtis. "Web accessibility: making your web site accessible to the blind."
Retrieved Aug. 31, 2001. <http://www.nfb.org/tech/webacc. htm>.
Dixon, Judith M. "Creating a web for all: access for blind and visually impaired users."
In Accessible libraries on campus: a practical guide for the creation of disability-friendly libraries. Edited by Tom McNulty. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, American Library Association, 1999. p. 135-140.
Federal policy barriers to assistive technology.
Washington: National Council on Disability, 2000. 43p. Free. (1331 F Street NW, Suite 1050, DC 20004). Also available in alternative formats and on the Internet at <http://www.ncd.gov/newsroom/publications/assisttechnology.html>.
Kautzman, Amy M. "Virtuous, virtual access: making web pages accessible to people with disabilities."
Searcher, v. 6, June 1998: 42-49.
Kumar, Sangeeta. "Assistive technology for a community college library."
Illinois libraries, v. 81, spring 1999: 88-93.
Lisiecki, Christine. "Adaptive technology equipment for the library."
Computers in libraries, v. 19, June 1999: 18-20, 22.
"Making educational software accessible: design guidelines including math and science solutions."
Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://ncam.wgbh.org/cdrom/guideline/>.
Mates, Barbara T. "Accessibility guidelines for electronic resources: making the Internet accessible for people with disabilities."
Library technology reports, v. 37, July-Aug. 2001: 1-81 (entire issue).
Mates, Barbara T. Adaptive technology for the Internet: making electronic resources accessible to all.
Chicago, IL: American Library Association, 2000. 191p. $36. (ALA Order Fulfillment, 155 North Wacker Drive, 60606-1719). Also on the Internet at <http://www.ala.org/editions/samplers/mates/>.
Raskind, Marshall. "Assistive technology for children with learning difficulties."
2nd ed., 1999. Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://schwablearning.org/main.asp?page=3.1>.
Reed, Penny R. "Improving assistive technology services in your school district: what to do, where to begin."
Closing the Gap, v. 18, Dec. 1999-Jan. 2000: 1, 17, 22-25.
Rouse, Veronica. "Making the web accessible."
Computers in libraries, v. 19, June 1999: 48-50, 52-53.
Rowland, Cyndi. "Accessibility of the Internet in postsecondary education: meeting the challenge."
Universal Web Accessibility Symposium 2000. Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://www.webaim.org/articles/whitepaper. htm>.
Schmetzke, Axel. "Web accessibility at university libraries and library schools."
Library hi tech, v. 19, no. 1, 2001: 35-49.
Schuyler, Michael. "Adapting for impaired patrons."
Computers in libraries, v. 19, June 1999: 24, 26, 28-29.
"Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act: electronic and information technology accessibility standards."
Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://www.access-board.gov/508.htm>.
Suvino, Dawn M., and Janice O'Connor. "Access systems for blind and partially sighted PC users."
In Accessible libraries on campus: a practical guide for the creation of disability-friendly libraries. Edited by Tom McNulty. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries, American Library Association, 1999. p. 63-77.

Screen Magnifiers--Evaluation

Hsu, Chen-Yung, and Mark M. Uslan. "Ai Squared's ZoomText Xtra for Windows 95, 98, and NT 4.0."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 94, Jan. 2000: 45.
Hsu, Chen-Yung, and Mark M. Uslan. "Dolphin's LunarPlus version 4.01 for Windows 95/98/NT."
AccessWorld, v. 1, May 2000: 19-24, 26-27.
Hsu, Chen-Yung, and Mark M. Uslan. When is a little magnification enough? A review of Microsoft Magnifier.
AccessWorld, v. 1, July 2000: 9-14.
"Magnification programs for the computer screen."
American Foundation for the Blind fact sheet. Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://www.afb.org/info_document_view.asp?documentid=1387>.
Su, Joseph C., and Mark M. Uslan. "A review of ZoomText Xtra screen magnification program for Windows 95."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 92, Feb. 1998: 116-119.
Su, Joseph C., Mark M. Uslan, and Bradley K. Schnell. "A review of Supernova screen magnification program for Windows."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 93, Feb. 1999: 108-110.
Uslan, Mark M., Joseph C. Su, and Chen-Yung Hsu. "Henter-Joyce's MAGic for Windows NT."
AccessWorld, preview issue, 1999: 6-11.
Uslan, Mark M., Joseph C. Su, and Chen-Yung Hsu. "A review of Henter- Joyce's MAGic for Windows NT."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 93, Oct. 1999: 666-668.

Screen Readers--Evaluation

Earl, Crista L. "Access to databases: which Windows database programs work best with screen readers?"
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 93, Aug. 1999: 522-529.
Earl, Crista L. "Windows databases used with screen readers: an overview."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 93, June 1999: 386-390.
Earl, Crista L., and Jay D. Leventhal. "Henter Joyce's JAWS for Windows and GW Micro's Window-Eyes."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 94, Mar. 2000: 182-183.
Earl, Crista L., and Jay D. Leventhal. "Putting words to Windows: a review of JAWS for Windows and Window-Eyes."
AccessWorld, v. 1, Mar. 2000: 28, 30-39.
Earl, Crista L., and Jay D. Leventhal. "A strategy for accessing a Windows application with a screen reader."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 93, Apr. 1999: 247-250.
Earl, Crista L., and Jay D. Leventhal. "A survey of Windows screen reader users: recent improvements in accessibility."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 93, Mar. 1999: 174-177.
Leventhal, Jay D., and Crista L. Earl. "A review of outSPOKEN for Windows."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 92, Dec. 1998: 840-844.
Leventhal, Jay D., and Crista L. Earl. "A review of two speech access programs for Windows 95: SLIMWARE Window Bridge and WinVision."
Journal of visual impairment and blindness, v. 92, Apr. 1998: 240-244.
Leventhal, Jay D., and Koert Wehberg. "The great screen reader race: a review of the two leading screen readers."
AccessWorld, v. 2, September 2001: 5-14.

Speech Synthesizers--Evaluation

"Speech synthesis resources."
Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://trace.wisc.edu/docs/speechsynthesizers>.
"Synthetic speech systems."
American Foundation for the Blind fact sheet. Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://www.afb.org/info_document_view.asp?documentid=1284>.

Software for Web Access--Evaluation

Earl, Crista L., Jay D. Leventhal, and Koert Wehberg. "A review of IBM Home Page Reader and pwWebSpeak."
AccessWorld, preview issue, 1999: 16-25.

Braille Displays

Blazie, Deane. "Refreshable braille now and in the years ahead."
Braille monitor, v. 43, Jan. 2000: 56-62.
Braille technology.
American Foundation for the Blind fact sheet. Retrieved July 11, 2001. <http://www.afb.org/info_document_view. asp?documentid=1282>.
Leventhal, Jay D., and Crista L. Earl. "The quiet touch: an overview of braille access to Windows."
AccessWorld, v. 1, May 2000: 9-16.
National Institute of Standards and Technology. NIST Braille Display Project. "The NIST rotating-wheel-based refreshable braille display."
Retrieved July 7, 2001. <http://www.itl.nist.gov/div895/isis/projects/brailleproject.html>.

Selective Internet Resources on Assistive Technology

Access to the Internet, Web, and Windows
http://www.nyise.org/access.htm
Includes links to accessible web design, Lynx web browser, Net-Tamer, Unix access, Windows access, Java accessibility, access resources, and blindness links.
Accessible Web Page Design
http://www.makoa.org/web-desi.htm
http://www.disabilityresources.org/WEB.html
http://www.washington.edu/doit/Resources/web-design.html
http://library.uwsp.edu/aschmetz/Accessible/pub_resources.htm
Provides resources to design accessible web pages.
Alliance for Technology Access (ATA)
http://www.ATAccess.org/
Has information on web-page design and on adaptive devices and software that enhance access to the World Wide Web for people with disabilities.
Apple Computer, Inc.
http://www.apple.com/disability/
Describes Macintosh adaptive technology for individuals with disabilities.
CAST (Center for Applied Special Technology)
http://www.cast.org/
Features projects developed by CAST's Universal Design for Learning (UDL); provides a link to Bobby, its HTML analyzer, that will check a web site's accessibility; and has links to educational software and web resources that support UDL concepts.
Center for Accessible Technology (CAT)
http://www.cforat.org/
Offers assistive technology articles and reviews of software and hardware in full text, information on adapting web browsers, and a listing of online disability resources.
Center for Information Technology Accommodation (CITA)
http://www.gsa.gov/Portal/home.jsp
Has papers on accessible topics, including Overview of accommodation solutions and Assistive Technology Act of 1998 and links to federal accommodation programs.
CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM)
http://ncam.wgbh.org/
Retrofits existing media, such as movies, with access technology and designs access into emerging telecommunications such as digital television and the World Wide Web. Presents Making educational software accessible and Prototype talking electronic program guide.
Equal Access to Software and Information (EASI)
http://www.rit.edu/~easi/
Includes information on adaptive hardware and software resources, adaptive technology publications, library access resources, and EASI Educational Internet Captioning and Transcription Service.
International Business Machines Accessibility Center
http://www-3.ibm.com/able/
Describes products for people with disabilities and resources to make information and technology more accessible to employees with disabilities.
Large print and speech access to the World Wide Web
http://www.tsbvi.edu/technology/web.htm
Includes links to basic concepts of the World Wide Web and browsers, modifying the browser with built-in options, and using a browser with add-on access.
Microsoft Corporation
http://www.microsoft.com/enable/
Presents Microsoft's accessibility products and applications.
NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) Mosaic Access Page
http://bucky.aa.uic.edu/
Provides information on access methods by disability, access methods by operating system, and links to resources such as list servers and funding information for assistive technology.
Starling Access Services
http://www.starlingweb.com/
Offers consulting services, seminars, and links to sites on HTML accessibility and to the guide Accessible web page design.
TIA Access
http://www.tiaonline.org/access/
Presents Marketing to consumers with disabilities and the Resource guide for accessible design of consumer electronics.
Trace Research and Development Center
http://trace.wisc.edu/
Develops resources to make information technologies and telecommunication systems more accessible and usable by people with disabilities, including web links to designing more usable web sites.
Usability.gov
http://www.usability.gov
Provides resources to design usable and accessible web sites and user interfaces, including usability testing and statistics on Internet usage.
Web Accessibility in Mind (WebAIM)
http://www.webaim.org/
Seeks to improve accessibility to online learning opportunities for all people. Maintains an Accessibility Forum e-mail discussion group.
Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
http://www.w3.org/WAI/
Has resources on web accessibility, including User agent accessibility guidelines 1.0 and a working draft (August 24, 2001) of Web content accessibility guidelines 2.0.
WebABLE
http://www.webable.com/
Serves as a provider of web accessibility technology, consulting, and training. Reviews a client's web site for accessibility and usability for people with disabilities.

Compiled by
Carol Strauss
Reference Section
October 2001

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Posted on 2013-06-28