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Womanishness

The dissonance of women. The shrill frilly silly 
drippy prissy pouty fuss of us. And all the while 
science was the music of our minds. Our sexual 
identities glittery as tinsel, we fretted about god’s 
difficulties with intimacy, waiting for day’s luster 
to fade so we could slip into something less 
venerated. Like sea anemones at high tide 
our minds snatched at whatever rushed by. 
Hush, hush my love. All these things happened 
a long time ago. You needn’t be afraid of them now.

—Amy Gerstler

“Womanishness” Amy Gerstler.

Court Green Magazine, 2012.

By permission of the author.

Amy Gerstler

Amy Gerstler

Amy Gerstler (1956- ) was born in California and attended both Pitzer and Bennington Colleges. She is the author of over a dozen poetry collections, two works of fiction, as well as essays and reviews. She received the National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry for her collection Bitter Angel (1991), and her Dearest Creature (2009) was named a “Notable Book of the Year” by The New York Times. Photo Credit: Brian Tucker.

Learn more about Amy Gerstler at The Poetry Foundation