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Annual Report
Hispanic Foundation 1942-1943


 

Introduction

The aims of the Hispanic Foundation may be briefly described as follows:

I. To build up a comprehensive collection of materials on all aspects of Hispanic culture, carefully organized for reference purposes and made available to investigators of all nations for consultation under the freest possible conditions.

II. To prepare a special catalog to include all material in the Library on Hispanic culture whether housed in the Hispanic Foundation or not.

III. To compile and to assist other institutions to compile basic reference works such as the Guide to Latin American Periodicals in the Library of Congress, a Guide to the Rare Spanish Publications in the Library of Congress, the Guide to the Art of Latin America, and the Handbook of Latin American Studies.

IV. To build up a photographic Archive of Hispanic Fine and Folk Arts.

Substantial progress was made during the year toward achieving these objectives, chiefly perhaps because funds to secure appropriate personnel were available from the Rockefeller Foundation until December 31, 1943 and from the Inter-departmental Committee for Cooperation with the American Republics and the Endowment for the Maintenance and Equipment of the Hispanic Room throughout the year.

Services

I. Books and other materials issued for use in the Library

a. Issued 9 A.M. to 5:45 17,810.

b. Called for after Hispanic Room is closed.

The Hispanic Foundation is not in a position to keep a record of this material.

II. Books and other materials issued for outside use 2791

III. Interlibrary loans

            No report

IV. Photo-reproduction and recording

            No report

V. Study rooms and scholarly services

            No report

VI. Use of Union Catalog and other bibliographical apparatus

            No report

VII. Reference inquiries answered

    A. Correspondence

    Communications routed through the Reference Department comprised 1101 letters distributed by months as follows:

      July 75
      August 100
      September 97
      October 110
      November 194
      December 59
      January 101
      February 153
      March 93
      April 52
      May 34
      June 33
      TOTAL 1101

       

       

       

       

       

       

     

 

 

Of the total of 1101 letters sent, 369 were form letters. 206 of the total number of letters received came through the Reference Department; 895 letters were received direct by the Hispanic Foundation.

B. Personal Inquiries

Telephone and direct inquiries received numbered 3632.

C. Bibliographical and other compilations prepared as a part of the reference service of the Hispanic Foundation. The following list is not complete, but is selected to illustrate the nature of bibliographical and other research done. A number of the requests came from Latin America.

  1. A partial bibliography of the writings of Alezander von Humboldt on Mexico.
  2. A list of works on Baron Rio Branco.
  3. Lists of books and plays on Latin America for children.
  4. A list of recent works on the governments of the Latin American nations.
  5. References on industrialization, and money and banking systems.
  6. A bibliography on the Jewish colonies of Surinam, Dutch Guiana.
  7. References on the Mennonites in Paraguay.
  8. A list of travel books on Brazil written between 1867 and 1890.
  9. A selected bibliography on Brazil and the Amazon.
  10. A list of works on Latin American journalism.
  11. A list of plays and works on the Brazilian theater.
  12. A list of works in the Library of Congress by and concerning Estanislao del Campo.
  13. A list of works on Benito Juárez.
  14. Bibliographies on the Negro in Latin America, especially Brazil.
  15. A bibliography on Bartolomé de las Casas, and Spanish colonial institutions.
  16. References on Mexican railways and government finances since 1928.
  17. Information, with bibliographical citations, on certain persons of Polish extraction in Latin America.
  18. Translations of passages from works (in French, Spanish and Portuguese) on Colombus’ first voyage, and completion of Bibliographical citations to them.
  19. Information, with bibliographical data for a list of publications submitted by the Division of International Conferences, Department of State.
  20. Completion of bibliographical data for a list of publications submitted by the Division of International Conferences, Department of State.
  21. Translation of a request from the Director of the Federal District, Mexico, for information and materials on early printing and journalism in the United States.
  22. Information on Latin American periodicals for the Strategic Index of Latin America, Yale University.
  23. Material on William James in Brazil, requested by the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs.
  24. Reference checked for the English translation of Os Sertões, made by Mr. Samuel Putnam.
  25. Illustrations for a book on Sam Martín.
  26. Illustrations for an article on Bolivar.
  27. Illustrations for a book on colonial Latin America.
  28. Information on Latin American colonial furniture.
  29. Outstanding similarities and dissimilarities between Spain and Latin America.
  30. Information on Basque terms—their sources and meanings.
  31. latest program of studies and their evaluation of the University of San Marcos.
  32. Information on bull-fights in South America.
  33. Bibliography of works in English – fiction and non-fiction – with South America as a background for college students.
  34. Sources of many works: Spanish and Portuguese – including publishers, imprints, dates, prices, evaluation, etc.
  35. Identification and addresses of outstanding Latin American Societies.
  36. Bibliography on philosophy and its trends and influence in Latin America.
  37. Bibliography on Haitian Tales.
  38. Spanish translation of Thanitopsis.
  39. Proper salutations for women in Spanish.
  40. List of comprehensive books on Argentine culture, civilization, etc.
  41. Sources of Spanish and Portuguese translations of the life of Abraham Lincoln.
  42. Information and sources of Argentine ornithology.
  43. Critical works and English translation of Quetzalcoatl – Aztec epic poem.
  44. List of books concerning history, labor, education, etc. of Chile.
  45. Compilation of grammars and texts for teaching English to Spanish speaking people.
  46. List of the best universal geographies in Spanish.
  47. Information concerning flag used as standard by Cálvez.
  48. Source of bibliographical data on translations of non-literary French works into Spanish.
  49. Latin American poetry in English translation – individual poems.
  50. Best loved poems of America in Spanish translation.
  51. Bibliography of texts on geography of South America – illustrated editions.
  52. Information on recent trends in Latin America’s economic policy.
  53. Sources of information on relations between the United States and South America.
  54. Meanings and sources of technical Spanish words.
  55. Interpreting Spanish botanical words and their sources.
  56. Translating judicial terms and phrases.
  57. Bibliography on Portuguese grammars and texts.
  58. Bibliography on illustrated Spanish texts for children.
  59. Bibliography on beginners’ Spanish for college students.
  60. Bibliography of Spanish books dealing with Latin America and Mexico for adults.
  61. Information on the Catholic Church in Spain.
  62. Bibliography on Spain and the Spanish Civil War.
  63. Information and texts concerning diplomatic forms and salutation in Spanish.
  64. Bibliography on Simón Bolívar.
  65. Information and criticism on Poesía Espirituales by José Manuel Valdés.
  66. Information and criticism on the pearl necklace of Queen Isabella of Spain.
  67. Interpretation of the Mexican coat of arms.
  68. List of outstanding Portuguese dictionaries.
  69. Information and sources of books on Gabriela Mistral.
  70. List of outstanding comprehensive books on insects in Spanish.
  71. Information on outstanding religious shrines in Latin America.
  72. Biographical and critical information on the outstanding saints and religious figures of Latin America.
  73. Bibliography of works on Argentina, including history, civilization, etc. in English.
  74. Information concerning Directorio Panamericano.
  75. Bibliography on animal life in South America.
  76. Spanish transplantation of Washington’s Farewell address.
  77. List of the best English translation of the works of Santa Teresa de Ávila.
  78. Statistical estimates of Spanish and English speaking people in the world.
  79. Bibliography on Spanish literature in concise form- Spanish and English.
  80. Bibliography on the outstanding Spanish technical dictionaries.
  81. Information concerning edible and non-edible plants in South America.
  82. Information relative to Latin Americanisms.
  83. Detailed information concerning Biblia del Oso.
  84. Development of South American poetry compared to that of North America.
  85. Translation of old Spanish songs.
  86. Information concerning the earliest universities, newspapers, printed books and Churches of South America.
  87. Information concerning the political and geographical evaluation of Spain and Peru.
  88. Information concerning Ladino dialect. Translation of Ladino letters.
  89. Criticism and description of Ilustrados – Puerto Rican publication.
  90. Sources of Spanish short stories in English translation.
  91. List of the outstanding South American romances in Spanish.
  92. List of outstanding Catholic authors in South America.
  93. Analysis of the grammatical meaning and structure of “a la que” and “a lo que.”
  94. Bibliography on the Argentine novel.
  95. Sources of Spanish editions of works of J. Verne and A. Dumas.
  96. Identification and information available concerning Bunda.
  97. Critical bibliography on the dramas of Jacinto Benavente.
  98. Sources of reference on current research in the field of Spanish literature.
  99. Critical bibliography on Domingo Faustín Sarmiento.
  100. Meaning of Augustinian symbols.
  101. Information concerning Spanish and Portuguese academies.
  102. List of geographical readers of Latin America.
  103. List of outstanding Spanish dictionaries.
  104. Sources of pictures relating to Santa Teresa de Ávila.
  105. Sources of criticisms on the dramas of Miguel Ramos Carrión and Vital Aza.
  106. Lists and references on the national shrines of South America.
  107. Sources and sketches of the uniforms of the Spanish colonel in 1804.
  108. List of reference books for methods of teaching Spanish in the High School.
  109. Critical bibliography on Santa Rosa de Lima.
  110. List of outstanding historical figures of South America.
  111. Detailed information concerning Minas Geraes.
  112. Outstanding histories of South America.

D. Miscellaneous inquiries received and answered:

Among such inquiries most often received are questions concerning Spanish, Portuguese, and Latin American publishers; English-Spanish and English-Portuguese dictionaries, especially in technical fields; translations of Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American books; and periodical publications.

VIII. Important reports prepared

A. The relation of the Hispanic Foundation to the war effort.

B. Use of periodicals by the staff of the Hispanic Foundation.

C. Use of grants from the Rockefeller Foundation to the Hispanic Foundation 1939-1942.

D. The reference collection of the Hispanic Foundation.

E. Expansion of the Archive of Hispanic Culture by the creation of a master file of photographs and the preparation of teaching sets on Latin American art.

IX. New routines, procedures, projects, and changes or revisions in policy

A. The principal change contemplated is:

The improvement of the reference collection in the Hispanic Room by the addition of a section on maps and the current issues of some 60 outstanding periodicals from Latin America.

B. The principal new projects to be carried out are:

1. The expansion of the Archive of Hispanic Culture by the creation of a master file of photographs and the preparation of teaching sets on Latin America under the terms of a grant made to the Hispanic Foundation by the Rockefeller Foundation for a 2 year period beginning July 1, 1943.

2. The planning and preparation of a Guide to the Hispanic Collections of the Library of Congress.

C. The principal revision of policy is:

Keeping current issues of some 60 outstanding Hispanic periodicals in the Hispanic Room for the use of readers and members of the staff of the Hispanic Foundation.

X. Cooperation

A. With Other Divisions

1. Accessions. One assistant (SP4) was lent to the Accessions Division to assist in the searching and ordering of Hispanic items.

2. Manuscripts: Preparations of photocopies of Hispanic manuscripts for presentation to the University of Guayaquil, Guayaquil, Ecuador; University of San Marcos, Lima, Peru; University of Cuzco, Cuzco, Peru; and the Museo Nacional de Arqueología, Historia y Etnografía, Mexico, D.F.

3. Music: Preparation of disks for the Brazilian blind.

4. The following members of other divisions assisted in the preparation of the final version of the Guide to Latin American Periodicals: James B. Childe (Documents) and Manuel Sánchez (Consultant Service).

B. With Other Government Agencies

1. Department of State

a. Dr. Hanke was appointed secretary of the National Committee to aid the National Library of Peru and the Lima Geographical Society.

b. Dr. Hanke was lent by the Library of Congress to the Division of American Republics for a special project, November 15, 1942 to June 1, 1943. During his absence the Assistant Directo, Dr. Smith served as Director, while Dr. C.K. Johnes served as Assistant Director.

c. Division of Cultural Relations

d. Interdepartmental Committee on Cooperation with the other American Republics

2. Office of the Coordinator of Inter-Ameircan Affairs

3. U.S. Office of Education, Department of the Interior

4. The Library of the Department of Agriculture in the field of Hispanic periodicals and the Pan American Sanitary Bureau of the Pan American Union, in connection with the publication of the Guide to the Periodicals of Latin America.

a. The staff of the Hispanic Foundation prepared reports and bibliographies, attended meetings, dinners, and luncheons at the request of these agencies and in various other ways sought to aid in their program to foster cultural relations with the other American Republics.

C. With Other Libraries and Scholarly Groups

1. American Library Association

Dr. Hanke served as a member of the American Library Association Advisory Committee for the Books for Latin America project, and as a member of the Committee for Cooperation with Latin American libraries.

2. American Council of Learned Societies

a. Dr. Smith contributed the section on Brazilian art to the 7th annual Handbook of Latin American Studies. Dr. Charmion Shelby was appointed editor of the section on bibliography. Dr. Hanke and Dr. Smith served as members of the Advisory committee of the Handbook of Latin American Studies. Dr. Smith prepared the section on Brazilian Art for the Handbook of Brazilian Studies.

b. Dr. Hanke served as member of the American Council of Learned Society’s Committee on Grans-in-Aid and as a member of the Advisory Board of its Inter-American Training Centers. Dr. Smith served as a lecturer and consultant on Brazil for the Washington Center.

3. Strategic Index of Latin America of Yale University

Dr. Hanke served as a member of its Advisory Board.

4. The Three National Councils

Dr. Hanke was a member of the Joint Committee on Latin American Studies, which represents the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council, and the National Research Council. Dr. Smith was appointed to the Sub-Committee on Research.

5. The National Library of Venezuela

Miss Ione M. Kidder, who was sent to be technical assistant to Dr. Enrique Planchart, director of this library on a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation continued her work there throughout the fiscal year.

6. Institutuo Benjamin Constant, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

The project to record for the use of the Brazilian blind great examples of Brazilian literature recited in Portuguese begun last year, was completed in cooperation with the Music Division and its Phonoduplication Laboratory.

Through funds from the CIAA it was possible to offer the Instituto Benjamin Constant in Rio de Janeiro, the national institution for the training of the blind, a set of extra-long playing records and a machine especially equipped to play them.

Before the material was handed over to the Brazilian Embassy to be transmitted to the Instituto Benjamin Constant an audition of some of the disks was arranged, January 22, 1943, in the Whittall Pavilion at which a number of Brazilians, including Dr. Fernando Lobo, Minister Counsellor of Brazil, were present.

The catalog of the records follows:

  • “O livro falante” (1 side) — Robert C. Smith
  • “Uma senhora”– from Histórias sem data of Machado de Assis — Custódio de Almeida
  • Selections from Ruy Barbosa (1 side) — Custódio de Almeida
  • Selections from Joaquim Nabuco — Custódio de Almeida
  • Iracema of José de Alencar (24 sides) — Paulo Lopes Correia
  • Canção de exílio and Marabá (1 side) — Ana Amelia de Queiros Carneiro de Mendonça
  • Se Morre de smoreby Antonio Gonçalves Dias (1 side) — Ana Amelia de Queiros Carneiro de Mendonça
  • Sonnets by Euclydes da Cunha (2 sides), and Inocência by Taunay (2 sides) — Mario Pedrosa
  • Selections from Antonio Castro Alves (3 sides) — José Famadas

7. Other institutions in Latin America

Under the provisions of the Exchange Project carried on with funds transferred to the Library by the State Department a  large number of Library of Congress printed cards, publications from the Library’s duplicate collection, Photostats and microfilms of material, disks, and other items, were sent on the principle of exchange to a wide variety of institutions in Latin America. Institutions which received material are as follows:

Printed Cards

1. Biblioteca Pública, Estado de Jalisco, Guadalajara, México.

2. Biblioteca Benjamín Franklin, México, D.F.

3. American Library, Managua, Nicaragua.

4. Superintendencia de Bancos, Managua, Nicaragua.

5. Biblioteca Municipal, Cuzco, Perú.

6. Departamento Nacional de Producão Mineral, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

7. Instituto de Sociología Boliviana, Universidad de Sucre, Sucre, Bolivia.

8. Biblioteca de Sanidad y Asistencia Social, Caracas, Venezuela.

9. Instituto Indigenista Inter-americano, México, D.F.

10. Biblioteca Nacional, Managua, Nicaragua.

11. Instituto Técnico de Policía, México, D.F.

12. Ábside, México, D.F.

13. Paraguayan Embassy, Washington D.C.

14. Biblioteca Central, Universidad Nacional, Santiago, Chile.

15. Departamento Administrativo do Serviço Público (DASP), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

16. Biblioteca de la Dirección General de Estadística de la Nación, Ministerio de Hacienda, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

17. Biblioteca de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

18. Biblioteca de Instituto Brasileiro de Geografía e Estatística, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

19. Biblioteca de la Dirección General de Estatística, Ministerio de Fomento, Santiago, Chile.

20. Biblioteca de la Controlaría General de la República, Bogotá, Colombia.

21. Biblioteca de la Secretaría de Hacienda, México, D.F.

22. Biblioteca de la Dirección Nacional de Estadística, Ministerio de Hacienda y Comercio, Lima, Perú.

23. Biblioteca Central de la Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

24. Biblioteca de la Dirección General de Estadística, Montevideo, Uruguay.

25. Biblioteca de la Dirección General de Estadística, Ministerio de Fomento, Caracas, Venezuela.

Microfilms

1. Fondo de Cultura Económica, México, D.F.

2. Escuela Nacional de Antropología, México, D.F.

3. Universidad Nacional de Tucumán, Tucumán.

4. Biblioteca Central, Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

5. Instituto de Neuro-Psiquiatría, México, D.F.

6. Instituto de investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Autónoma Nacional, México, D.F.

Photostats

1. Escuela Nacional de Antropología, México, D.F.

2. Fondo de la Cultura Económica.

3. Universidad Nacional de Panamá, Panamá, C.A.

4. Universidad de Guayaquil, Guayaquil, Ecuador.

5. Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

6. Universidad del Cuzco, Cuzco, Perú.

7. Colegio de México, México, D.F.

Photographs and measured drawings of early United States architecture

1. Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes, Ciudad Trujillo, República Dominicana.

2. Biblioteca Nacional, Panamá, Panamá.

3. Ministerio de Educación, San José, Costa Rica.

4. Museo Colonial, Caracas, Venezuela.

5. Dirección de Cultura, Habana, Cuba.

6. Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes, Bogotá, Colombia.

7. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Córdoba, Argentina.

8. Universidad de La Habana, Habana, Cuba.

9. Universidad Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.

10. Biblioteca Pública Municipal, São Paulo, Brasil.

11. Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes, Tegucigalpa, Honduras.

12. Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Slides of Latin American Art

1. Inter-American Bureau of Information, Montevideo, Uruguay.

2. Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Autónoma Nacional, México, D.F.

Phonographic recordings of American folk music

Instituto Indigenista Inter-americano, México, D.F.

Maps of the U.S.

Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad Nacional, Santiago, Chile.

Duplicate Publications

1. Colegio de Abogados de la Libertad, Trujillo, Perú.

2. Inter-American Radio Office, Habana, Cuba.

3. Universidad de Sucre, Sucre, Bolivia.

4. Dirección de Cultura, Habana, Cuba.

5. Biblioteca Popular “Sarmiento,” Córdoba, Argentina.

6. Museo Nacional, Santiago, Chile.

7. Junta de Asistencia Social, Rosario, Argentina.

8. Biblioteca Popular “Alberto M. Andrade,” Cuenca, Ecuador.

9. Universidad de Nuevo León, Monterrey, México.

10. Biblioteca Pública, Estado de Jalisco, Guadalajara, México.

11. Escuela Nacional de Antropología, México, D.F.

12. Biblioteca, Universidad Católica Bolivariana, Medellín, Colombia.

13. Biblioteca de la Academia de Bellas Artes, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

14. Instituto de Investigaciones Históricas, Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina; Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes, Tecgucigalpa, Honduras.

15. Biblioteca García Moreno, Cuenca, Ecuador.

16. Facultad de Bellas Artes, Universidad Nacional, Santiago, Chile.

8. Cooperation with Latin American reviews

Dr. Hanke served as a member of the Editorial Board of the Revista de Historia de América (Mexico City) and of the Anales de la Sociedad de Historia Argentina (Buenos Aires) while Dr. Smith continued as a member of the Advisory Committee of the Mexican fine arts periodical, Ars.

9. Distribution of publications

In the past year the number of publications distributed by the Hispanic Foundation has increased steadily. The demand for such material seems to justify the program undertaken by the Hispanic Foundation of preparing a series of bibliographies. No. 1 of the series, “Latin American belles-letteres in English translation,” by James A. Granier, has been constantly in demand since its appearance in the spring of 1942. The original edition of 700 copies was exhausted; a revised edition was prepared and distributed in the fall and winter of 1942, and early in 1943 a reproduction of the revised edition was issued by the Office of the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs. Of the 500 copies of this issue, 200 were sent to the Hispanic Foundation for distribution.

Another publication much in demand it “The fine and folk arts of the other American republics: a bibliography of publications in English prepared by the Archive of Hispanic Culture, Hispanic Foundation. A revised and enlarged edition of this bibliography is now nearly exhausted.

The recently issued “Murals by Cândido Portinari in the Hispanic Foundation of the Library of Congress, by Robert C. Smith, is in frequent demand. Of the 425 copies distributed to date, 175 went to Latin America.

Investigations in progress in the United States in the field of humanistic and social science studies, edited by Alexander Marchant, Charmion Shelby and John E. Englekirk, was issued by the Hispanic Foundation in the summer of 1942 in an edition of approximately 1500 copies. By the end of August 1942, 1050 copies had been distributed, of which about 200 went to Latin America. Approximately 200 additional copies have since been distributed in response to requests.

In February 1943, a Latin American mailing list of some 650 names of individuals and institutions was prepared for the “Bibliography of Latin American bibliographies, by C.K. Jones, no. 2 of the Latin American series of the Library of Congress. Distribution of this work in the United States is through the Superintendent of Documents.

In December 1942, the Hispanic Foundation prepared a selective list of periodicals, newspapers, and organizations in the United States to which the Library of Congress should send its releases on Hispanic news items relating to the Library. The list was prepared at the request of the office of Information of the Library and contained 108 names.

In addition to the publications already named, others not issued by the Library of Congress have been available to the Hispanic Foundation for distribution:

The Spanish translation of The American way of life by H.U. Faulkner and others, published under the title Vida del pueblo norteamericano (Fondo de cultura económica, Mexico, 1941). Most of the copies of this work entrusted to the Hispanic Foundation for distribution in Latin America were sent out before July 1942. However, an occasional copy has been sent since that time, in response to requests. The supply is now practically exhausted.

Arts, crafts and customs of our neighbor republics, a bibliography compiled by Emilie S. Lasselle, etc…U.S. Office of Education, 1942. Sent in response to requests for material in this field. Fifty copies of a new printed edition have been received recently.

Preliminary list of libraries in the other American republics, compiled by Rodolfo O. Rivera. American Library Association, Washington, D.C. 1942. Sent in response to requests for such information.

Latin America: books for North American readers, compiled by Betty Adler. American Library Association, Chicago, 1940. Sent in response to requests for a general bibliography of works in English.

D. Plans for further cooperation

The principal activity projected is amplification of the Exchange project. This project has been broadened to include the distribution of large numbers of the publications of the Carnegie Institution and Endowment for International Peace to institutions in Latin America along with items from the duplicate collections of the Library of Congress. The scope of this project has been further widened to permit a limited use of the Exchange funds from the Interdepartmental Committee for purchase of material not in the duplicate collections or otherwise available for distribution by the Library of Congress, to be offered on an exchange basis to institutions in Latin America.

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Apparatus

New bibliographical enterprises undertaken

A. Special project: Guide to Latin American periodicals

  Work on the revision of the preliminary edition of Latin American periodicals currently received in the Library of Congress, prepared by Murray M. Wise and others, and issued by the Hispanic Foundation in 1941, was begun before July 1, 1942, but the greater part of it has been done since that date, principally by Dr. Shelby.

It was planned to revise and enlarge the preliminary edition of this guide, and to give in addition to bibliographical information, a brief note of description or evaluation for each title included. The notes were to be prepared, whenever possible, by specialists in the fields with which the respective publications are concerned. This plan has been carried out and enlarged. The desirability of expanding the periodicals guide to include titles of publications not in the Library of Congress which are received in the libraries of other government agencies in Washington had been discussed on several occasions. A step was taken in this direction when arrangements were made in October 1942, with Mr. Ralph R. Shaw, Librarian of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, for the inclusion in the guide of a number of titles received in the extensive Latin American periodical collection of that library. Miss Elizabeth Hopper assembled the materials, and Mrs. A.M. Hannay prepared reviews for these titles and for an additional number of publications received in both libraries, a total of 254 titles.

Valuable cooperation has been obtained from other agencies as well. Mr. G.A. Rohen y Gálvez, who is engaged in compiling a bibliography of Latin America periodicals in the fields of labor and social security under the auspices of the American Council of Learned Societies, prepared reviews for 56 such periodicals received by the Library of Congress. Dr. Arístides A. Moll, Secretary of the Pan American Sanitary Bureau, reviewed 45 periodicals dealing with public health and allied subjects, all of which are received in the Library of Congress.

Reviews of periodicals in other fields have been prepared by the following persons, most of whom are or have been on the staff of the Library of Congress: Getty Adler, Crawford M. Bishop, Miron Burgin, Marie Willis Cannon, Gilbert Chase, James B. Childe, Lewis Hanke, Cecil Knight Jones, Alexander Marchant, Anyda Marchant, Alfred Métraux, Madaline W. Nichols, David Rubio, Manuel Sánchez, Robert C. Smith, Murray M. Wise.

Mr. Henry S. Parsons, Chief of the Periodicals Division of the Library of Congress, has acted as advisory editor.

The preliminary edition of the guide contained 915 titles. It is estimated that 1500 titles will be included in the revised edition, which will be indexed by subject, by country, and by publishing agency.

Preparation of copy is now in the final stages, and it is hoped to have the material ready for the press on or before September 1, 1943.

B. Development of the Hispanic Catalog

The project for completion of the Hispanic Catalog was terminated on December 31, 1942. From that time on, the assistant in the Hispanic Reading Room has continued working on it part time in order to keep filing in the current cards.

The catalog at present consists of approximately 500,000 cards. Some 40,000 author cards are now held for future processing. These, which consist of highly technical classes (i.e. legal, scientific, and medical) are now arranged by first letter and have to be alphabetized. The boxes of these cards are kept in the locked grill on Deck 29.

About 6000 main cards were out of print at the time that cards were drawn for the Hispanic Catalog. The galley sheets of reprints revised now have to be checked for these, and they are coming on as cards are being reprinted.

All current cards, as well as the reprints, must have the call numbers typed on them. The subject cards are separated, red-topped; and then all are alphabetized and filed into the Hispanic catalog.

 This work is regularly carried on by the assistant in the Hispanic Reading Room.

C. Guide to the Art of Latin America

Work continued on the final draft of this Guide which was undertaken in 1940-1941 on funds from the Interdepartmental Committee. During the period November 1, 1942 to June 30, 1943 a typist was added to the staff to assist in preparing the copy for publication. The directories dealing with art institutions in Latin America were submitted to the Division of Cultural Relations of the State Department in January 1943.

These were subsequently transmitted by the Division to the respective missions in Latin America, and were corrected and amplified, partly by the cultural relations officers and partly by specialists indicated by the Hispanic Foundation.

By June 30, 1943, directories had been returned with corrections from all the countries with the exception of Mexico, Colombia, Paraguay, Bolivia, Salvador, Argentina and Brazil. Meanwhile, with the aid of a second assistant during June 1943, the bibliography of some 5000 items which is an essential part of the Guide was typed in final form. Publication was postponed until all the corrected drafts from Latin America are returned and can be retyped for publication. It is hoped to be able to have the material ready for the press on October 1, 1943.

Maintenance and Administration of the Collections

I. Materials bound

Books sent to bindery 176

II. Material repaired and restored

A report was prepared last year recommending that the Hispanic Foundation be assigned a binding quota allowing us to send 100 books monthly to be rebound and 75 to be repaired. The oiling of the leather volumes should be taken care of as soon as possible to check for further deterioration. It is estimated that 1000 volumes need rebinding, 500 need repair, and 1500 leather bound volumes require oiling.

III. Material in need of processing

The uncatalogued Hispanic material on June 30, 1942 was substantially the same as reported on June 30, 1942, as follows:

1. First Portuguese collection 1,175

2. YA Portuguese collection (also known as Second Portuguese collection

a. 15,000 (Mr. Kremer’s estimate of items occupying 336 shelves on deck 40)

b. 225 (books in cage on deck 7 of annex) 15,225

3. Puerto Rican collection 1,250

4. Uncataloged books (Huntington and gift material, deck 7 of Annex 1,800

5. Spanish plays

a. Hispanic Society gift collection 5,850

b. Collection on deck 39 1,300

A good number of these plays have been cataloged but a large proportion of the Hispanic Society gift collection and the collection on Deck 39 are not yet processed. Control of this material is possible only through the catalog prepared by the Hispanic Society of its collection and through the shelf list for the plays on Deck 39. No author entries are available for the Hispanic Catalog.

6. Pamphlets 6,775

In collaboration with Jane Martin, Descriptive Catalog Division representative, Mr. Jones finished the examination and broad classification of this large and growing collection. The pamphlets are now arranged in the following groups:

1. Alphabetical by personal name (author or subject)

2. By country, including broadly descriptive, historical, political, social, and economic literature.

3. By subject, i.e., broad classes based on the L.C. classification system, Social sciences, Political sciences, Religion, Education, Science, Technology, Agriculture, etc. In some cases material on important mineral or agricultural products has been kept together, e.g., that on Petroleum, Coffee, Sugar, etc.

The pamphlets thus processed will, with the exception of certain classes (science, technology, and medicine), be forwarded to the Hispanic Foundation and placed in suitably labeled and arranged boxes in the locked grills on Deck 29.

IV. Changes in the Hispanic Reading Room

The silver lamps which were originally hung in the anteroom, and was removed after the painting of the murals by Cândido Portinari in 1941, has been rehung in the reading room.

As noted in the report of June 30, 1942, provision has been made for two specially constructed cases to be placed along the back walls of the two catalog alcoves to hold current pamphlets, books, and periodicals.

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Archive of Hispanic Culture

The Archive continued to function on funds from the Interdepartmental Committee. During the year the collection of photographs of Latin American art grew through purchase, gift, and exchange from 3259 to 5787 items, and the collection of slides from 1385 to 1469. As of June 1, 1943, the Archive possessed the following materials:

Photographs 5787
Slides 1460
Negatives 3890
Film rolls 16
Maps 6
Architectural drawings 12

Through the Division of Cultural Relations of the State Department the attention of the missions in Latin America was called to this Archive and the Library’s desire to obtain appropriate material for it by purchase and exchange. So far, the embassies in Cuba, Venezuela, Panama, and Costa Rica have obtained for the Archive outstanding photographs of the colonial and modern art and traditional costumes of those countries. Outstanding among these was a group of some 100 photographs of the Cuban colonial and modern architecture personally chosen by the Minister of Public Works, Evelio Govantes. This selection of material, like several others from official sources, came as a result of the exchange program begun by the Hispanic Foundation and its Archive last year. Through this program sets of photographs and measured drawings of early American architecture chosen from the HABS collection in the Library of Congress were sent to outstanding art and architectural organizations in Latin America. In return, it was hoped that similar material on the art of those countries could be had from the institutions receiving these collections. Of the 6 sets sent out the first year, 3 have already brought returns. The Comisión de Monumentos y Lugares Históricos in Buenos Aires, and the Universidad Nacional of Uruguay have both sent photographs, while in Mexico the Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas of the Universidad Autónoma Nacional has promised others. It is felt that as the Hispanic exchange program of the Library of Congress is expanded, more and more photographs will become available through official channels.

Other important gifts to the Archive during the period were the following:

300 photographs of modern Latin American art especially gathered for the Archive by the International Business Machines Corporation; 300 photographs of colonial and modern architecture taken by G.E. Kidder-Smith and Phillip Goodwin in Brazil in 1942, which were made available through the C.I.A.A. In addition Sergio Milliet, the recently appointed director of the Biblioteca Pública Municipal of São Paulo presented to the Archive a group of 218 splendid photographs of Brazilian painting and sculpture of the contemporary period, a sight which rounds out the Brazilian section. The Archive was also most fortunate to receive from Mrs. G.H. Kempton, some 138 fine negatives of the colonial buildings of Antigua, Guatemala. A list of the principal donors to the Archive of Hispanic Culture will be found listed at the end of this section.

For the first time in its history, funds were available to the Archive for purchases. Accordingly, the collection was increased by judicious acquisition of photographs from the Museum of Modern Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the archives of the University of Texas.

During the year, in addition to circulating the Bibliography of the Fine and Folk Arts of the other American Republics and continuing work on the preparation of the Guide to the Art of Latin America, the Archive answered routine requests for information. Exhibitions of mounted photographs of Latin American art from the Archive collection were lent to the University of Vermont during the Portuguese Institute held there in July 1942 to Hampton Institute, Hampton, Va., the Maryland Institute, Baltimore, Md., to Bard College, Annandale-on-the-Hudson during April 1940, and to the Board of Economic Warfare in June. Slides were lent for lecture purposes to the C.I.A.A., to the Muskegan Museum, Muskegan, Michigan, to Erie University, Erie, Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, and to the Public Library of Findley, Ohio. Photographs from the collection were published in the following periodicals: Ars (Mexico), Gazette des Beaux Arts (New York), Think, and the Inter-American Monthly.

The Archive was consulted by the Museum of Modern Art in connection with its exhibition of photographs, Brazil Builds and the catalog issued in connection with it. For the C.I.A.A. a mailing list of Brazilian artists and collectors was prepared. The Museum of Modern Art again consulted the Archive of Hispanic Culture in connection with its exhibit Latin Americans; the bibliography in the catalog was checked, and photographs from the Archive were there published. Photographs of Latin American art were provided for the C.I.A.A., for inclusion in a set of materials on American culture to be used by representatives in Bolivia.

Conferences were held with the director of the Seattle Art Museum, and with members of the staffs of Sweetbriar College, Wesleyan University, Macon, Georgia, and the Chicago Art Institute, in reference to their programs of Latin American art. Material from the Archive was provided for their use.

At the suggestion of Mr. René d’Harnoncourt, Acting Director of the Art Projects of the C.I.A.A., the Library of Congress submitted to the Rockefeller Foundation a proposal for a grant to enable the Archive of Hispanic Culture to expand its services. The proposal was acted upon favorably by the Foundation and word was received in June, 1943, that the sum of $17,650 would be made available for a two year period beginning July 1943. The purpose of this grant is to build up a master file of photographs of Latin American art and archeology, and to prepare teaching sets on Latin American art for use by schools and other organizations. It is felt that with this grant and one virtual completion of the Guide to the Act of Latin America the Archive of Hispanic Culture has completed its experimental stage and entered a new phase of existence.

List of donors to the Archive of Hispanic Culture:

  • International  Business Machines Corporation, New York City
  • Arquivo Historico Militar, Lisbon, Portugal
  • Ministerio de Instrucción Pública, Uruguay
  • Inter-American Bureau of Information, Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Escuela de Artes aplicadas, Santiago, Chile
  • Ministerio de Agricultura, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • Laboratorio de arte Americano, Facultad de Arquitectura, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay
  • Ministerio de Relaciones Exteriores, Argentine Republic
  • Comisión Nacional de Museos y Lugares Históricos, Buenos Aires, Argentina
  • Ministerio de Obras Públicas, Habana, Cuba
  • United States Embassies in Costa Rica, Panamá, Venezuela
  • Archison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad
  • Philadelphia Museum of Art
  • Yale University Art Gallery
  • Dartmouth College
  • San Francisco Stock Exchange Luncheon Club
  • Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs
  • National Geographic Society
  • National Park Service, U.S. Dept. of Interior
  • Municipal Art Museum, Davenport, Iowa
  • Mrs. Christine H. Kempton, Caracas, Venezuela
  • Miss Jane Watson
  • Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio
  • Lincoln Kirstein
  • Edith Igoe Sweeney
  • William Hedrich
  • Sergio Milliet, SãoPaulo, Brazil
  • Jose Perotti
  • Lt. Commander Arthur S. Riggs
  • Robert Woods Bliss
  • Grace L. Mc Cann Morley

 

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Acquisitions

I. Statement on Policy

A. Strength of existing collection 

 The collections are relatively strong in Hispanic publications printed since 1916, due to purchases made by means of the Huntington Fund. Before that date, the collections are strong in Spanish material, particularly nineteenth century drama and eighteenth century literature.

B. Weakness of existing collection

The periodical collection needs careful attention because many numbers are missing and new periodicals appear frequently. The collection of Latin American literature and history is relatively weak in publications issued before 1916.

II. Sources of acquisition

A. Appropriation funds

    ? (Mr. Moriarty is to be reported)

B. Endowment funds

Huntington Fund ?

C. Funds for immediate disbursement

none

D. Gifts

The effort to secure gifts from the living authors of Hispanic countries by means of a decorative gift request issued in English, Portuguese and Spanish was continued. The writers and institutions who have presented publications during the year may be found in the general list of donors to the Library of Congress.

 Gifts to the Archive of Hispanic Culture are listed above.

III. Plans for the Development of the Collections

1. Through the use of want-lists

The want-lists prepared by Dr. Madaline Nichols as par of her survey of the Library holdings in Spanish-American literature will be used in connection with our purchases in this field.

2. Archive of Hispanic Culture

Through the personnel and funds made available by the Rockefeller Foundation it is planned to build extensively the master file of photographs in the Archive by purchase, gift, and exchange.

3. Through analysis of the Hispanic periodical collection

Once Dr. Shelby has completed the Guide to Latin American Periodicals it is planned to analyze regularly certain files to make sure that all issues are here. If not they will be purchased or requested as gifts.

4. Collections

 Preliminary negotiations are being undertaken in connection with the possible purchase of the García-Ortiz collection in Bogotá, Colombia and if shipping improves between this country and Brazil a final attempt will be made to obtain the José Verissimo Collection of Braziliana in cooperation with Harvard University.

 5. The establishment of resident representatives of the Library throughout the world

Although trips by individuals will always be useful in building up our Hispanic collections, it is believed that the most satisfactory permanent solution will be to establish resident representatives of the Library in various parts of the world. Three or four representatives should be stationed in Latin America

IV. Acqusitions in the Hispanic Foundation for the Fiscal Year 1942-1943

(Excerpt from report of Dr. Rubio)

In spite of the difficulties of mail and transportation, the Hispanic Foundation is acquiring a great many items from Hispanic America. We regret to admit that very important material does not arrive from Spain and Portugal, but we hope that the representative of the Library who is now dividing his time between these countries, will be industrious enough to continue in the field which I left at the end of 1941.

From the official bibliography of Spain, one issue of which I have seen, I find that they still publish very interesting things in regard to the history and geography of South America, but I am sure we will obtain all these items when circumstances are favorable. In regard to South America, I can state that we are acquiring many worthwhile items and also many which are not worthwhile.

In regard to the literary production of Argentina and Mexico we can quote Luis Emilio Soto in “Argentina Libre,” January 14, 1943: “The literary balance sheet for 1942 is richer in episodes and anecdotal events than in significant attainments.” Writers did not find the calm needed for the maturing and writing of fiction, Novels by foreign writers were translated at an unusually fast pace, the publishing houses “Sudamericana” and “Salvador Rueda” leading the way.

Among the most memorable fictional works of 1942 by Argentines were Luis María Albamonte’s Puerto América, Augusto Mario Delfino’s Para Olvidarse de la Guerra, and Max Dickmann’s Frutos Amargos. Poetry is well represented by Silvina Ocampo of Enumeración de la Patria and the María Granata of Umbral de tierra, which was awarded the Martín Fierro Prize. Nothing spectacular came from the “younger generation.” From Mexico we might mention Héroes Mayas by Ermilo Abreu Gómez, and Flor de Juegos Antiguos, by Agustín Yánez – which he claims make up for the mediocre showing in the field of the novel. Literary criticism is rather well represented by Alfonso Reyes’ La Antigua Retórica, one of his series devoted to the history of aesthetic ideas, and Ultima Thule, which is “the most beautiful story ever told about the birth of our continent, from the old dreams which foreboded it to its materialization.” We might mention also that Agustín F. Cuenca by Francisco Monterde is perhaps the best contribution in the field of literary criticism. Agustín Yénez’a Fray Bartolomé de las Casas, el Conquistador Conquistado is remarkable biography because of the profound understanding of the drama of this tempestuous man and because of the original technique used by Yánez.

 

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Public Relations

I. Publications under the Library of Congress imprint

A. Bibliography of Latin-American Bibliographies, 2d. edition, revised and enlarged by the author with the assistance of James A. Granier. 1942. 311 p.

B. “Murals by Câdido Portinari” in the Hispanic Foundation of the Library of Congress by Robert C. Smith, 1943, 32 p., 8.

II. Publications by members of the staff

These will be found in the general list of publications by the staff of the Library of Congress.

III. Exhibitions

Exhibitions in the Hispanic Foundation are prepared by the Assistant Director in consultation with the office of Exhibits of the Library of Congress.

The following exhibitions were arranged during the year:

  • July – September 1942

    Color-plates of the costumes of Mexico by the Guatemalan painter, Carlos Mérida.

  • October

    Spanish-American Bookbinding.

    Natives types of Peru and Chile, painted in the nineteenth century for Mrs. William Wheelwright.

  • November – December

Haiti – In honor of the visit of M. Dantés Bellegarde.

  • January 1943

Latin-America a generation ago. Photographs of the nineteenth century from a gift of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

  • February

Festivals and folk dances in Latin America

  • March

Ecuadorian literature of the present day

  • April

Thomas Jefferson and the Americas. In conjunction with the celebration of the Jefferson Centennial throughout the Library.

  • Latin American Art

Holand Park Women’s Club, Washington, D.C. March 11, 1943.

  • Colonial Architecture of Brazil

Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts March 24, 1943.

  • Latin American Art

Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar, Virginia, April 1943.

  • Modern Latin American Art

Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson April, 1943.

  • Modern Latin American Art

Columbia University, New York City May 13, 1943.

  • Modern Latin American Art

Pius XI Guild, Washington D.C. May 27, 1943.

  • Colonial Latin American Art

University of Texas, Austin, Texas June 17, 1943.

I. Elizabeth Wilder

The Art of Brazil

Takoma Park Women’s Club, Tacoma Park, Maryland March 16, 1943.

A New estimate of Mexican Painting

    Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts April 26, 1943

II. Adresses by Staff Members

David Rubio

The Hispanic Foundation

          Recording for short wave broadcast to Latin America for the Coordinator of Inter-American Affairs, March 22, 1943.

The Background of Latin American Culture

          Pius XI Guild, Washington, D.C., March 28, 1943.

Libraries and the Printing Press in Latin America, July 10, 1943.

Robert C. Smith

Portuguese and Brazilian art

University of Vermont, Middlebury, Vermont, July 28, 29, 39, 1942.

Contemporary Painting in Latin America       

Alexandria Women’s Club, Alexandria, Virginia, October 28, 1942.

Latin American Colonial Art

Columbia University, New York City, Dec. 19, 1942.

Recent Developments in our Cultural Relations with Latin America

New York Ave. Presbyterian Church, Washington, D.C. January 24, 1943.

History and Fine Arts of Brazil

Connecticut College for Women, New London, Connecticut February 26, 1943.

III. Attendance at Meetings and Participation on Joint Committees      

Lewis Hanke           

1. Joint Committee on Latin American Studies

This committee represents the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council and the National research Council; and met every two months during the year.

2. Committee on Grants-in-Aid of the American Council of Learned Societies

This Committee met once during the year.

3. Strategic Index of Latin America

The advisory Committee of the Strategic Index of Latin America met twice during the year.

4. Advisory Committee of the Inter-American Training Center

This Committee met twice during the year.

David Rubio        

Ibero-American Institute

IV. Distinguished visitors to the Hispanic Foundation

  • His Excellency the President of Ecuador.
  • Dr. Enrique Albujar. Novelist and magistrate of Perú.
  • Dr. José Antonio Arce. Writer, Bolivia.
  • Dr. Raul Argaz. Dean, Facultad de Derecho, Universidad de Córdoba, Argentine Republic.
  • Dr. Bonilla Atiles. Dean, Facultad de Derecho, México, D.F.
  • Sr. Don Juan Beigbeder y Atienza. Former Spanish Minister of State.
  • M. Dantés Bellegarde. Cultural Attaché, Haitian Embassy, Washington.
  • Dr. Oswaldo Cabral. Directo, Asistencia Publica, Florianopolis, Brazil.
  • Dr. Ernesto Castellero. Director, Biblioteca Nacional, Panamá, Panamá
  • Dr. Delgado Peña. Newspaperman, Colombia.
  • Sr. Max Dickmann. Writer, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Fr. Doyls. Jesuit missionary and Chinese scholar, China.
  • Sr. Don Carlos Manuel Escalante. Ambassador from Costa Rica.
  • Dr. Alfredo Escobar. Rector, Universidad de Popayán, Popayán, Colombia.
  • Sr. Justino Fernández. Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, México, D.F.
  • Dr. Rodolfo Brito Foucher. Rector, Universidad Autónoma nacional, México, D.F.
  • De. Persio Franco. Former Chargé d’Affaires of the Dominican Republic.
  • Sr. José Uriel García. Senator of Peru, Cuzco, Peru.
  • Sr. Luis E. Gil Selguero. Professor, Universidad de la República, Montevideo.
  • Sr. Enrique García Granados. Professor and Antiquarian of University of Mexico.
  • Fr. Pedro Goicoechea. Missionary, Argentina.
  • Sr. Oswaldo Guayassmín. Painter, Quito, Ecuador.
  • Sr. Juan Ramón Jiménez. Poet, Spain.
  • Dr. Julio Jiménez Rueda. Dean, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad Autónoma Nacional de México.
  • Sr. Larraya. Ecuador.
  • Sr. Pedro Martínez. Director de Educación, Guatemala.
  • Sr. Wusebio McLean. Peruvian Chief of Protocol.
  • Members of the Bolivian, Uruguayan and Peruvian press.
  • Ana Amelia Queiros Carneiro de Mendonca. Brazilian representative, Inter-American Commission of Women.
  • Sr. Sergio Milliet. Director, Biblioteca Pública Municipal, São Paulo, Brazil.
  • Sr. José Nucete-Sardi. Journalist and writer, Venezuela.
  • Fr. Núñez. Economics scholar, Costa Rica.
  • Victoria Ocampo. Director of Sur. Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Dr. Edmundo O’Gorman. Director, Archivo de la Nación, México
  • Dr. Olmedo. México.
  • Dr. Fernando Ortiz. Director of Ultra, Habana, Cuba.
  • Carlos V. Penns. Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Sr. Peña. Colombia. Journalist of Colombia.
  • Sr. José Perotti. Director, Escuela de Artes Aplicados, Santiago, Chile.
  • Sra. Amanda Flores de Perotti. Sculptor, Santiago, Chile.
  • Sr. Emilio Pettoruti. Director, Museo Provincial de Bellas Artes, La Plata, Argentina.
  • Sr. Mariano Picón-Salas. Cultural Attaché, Venezuelan embassy, Washington.
  • Sr. José Pedro Puig. Montevideo, Uruguay.
  • Sr. Nicolas Repetto. Leader of the Socialist party, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Dr. Pedro Salinas. John Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • Dr. Raúl Silva Castro. Jefe, Sección Americana, Biblioteca Nacional, Santiago, Chile.
  • Sr. Guillermo Subercaseaux. Writer, Chile.
  • Rev. Colonel Tapia. Chaplain of Bolivian Army.
  • Dr. Manuel Toussaint. Director, Instituto de Investigaciones Estéticas, Universidad Autónoma Nacional, México.
  • Sr. Vázquez, Consul of Peru, New York.

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Personnel

Vacancies filled by promotions within the Division

1. Library Assistant –  December 1, 1942 (Carmen M. Couvillion)

2. Library Assistant – January 1, 1943 (Mercedes G. Balco)

3. Library Assistant – January 1, 1943 (Pauline Gage)

4. Director (Temporary) – December 1, 1942 – June 30, 1943 (Robert C. Smith)

5. Assistant Director (Temporary) – December 16, 1942 – June 30, 1943 (C.K. Jones)

Vacancies filled by promotions from other Division

1. Library Assistant – December 16, 1942 (Mary Ann Martinik)

2. Messenger – September 5, 1942 (Joseph M. Walsh)

Vacancies filled by appointments outside the Library

1. Library Assistant – December 1, 1942 (Margaret Nichols)

2. Messenger – March 3, 1943 (Robert B. Redwine)

3. Library Assistant – June 1, 1943 (C. Jean Nassell)

4. Library Assistant – June 5, 1943 (Angela Jones)

Special Projects executed by personnel whose compensation come from other than appropriated funds

A. Hispanic Catalog

1. From Endowment for Maintenance and Equipment of Hispanic Room

a. C.K. Jones – July 1, 1942 – December 15, 1942

b. Mercedes G. Balco – July 1, 1942 – December 31, 1942

2. From Rockefeller Grant

a. Jeanne H. Williams – July 1, 1942 – September 18, 1942

b. Margarita MacLean – July 1, 1942 – September 4, 1942

c. Betty Purnell – July 6, 1942 – December 31, 1942

d. Pauline Gage – November 8, 1942 – December 31, 1942

B. Preparation of the Guide to Latin American Periodicals

1. From Rockefeller Grant

a. Rae Grace Schwartzenfeld – July 1, 1942 – October 1, 1942

b. Verona Phillips – October 1, 1942 – November 15, 1942

2. From Endowment for Maintenance and Equipment of Hispanic Room

a. Pauline Gage – January 1, 1943 – April 5, 1943

b. C. Jean Nessel – June 1, 1943 – June 30, 1943

C. Archive of Hispanic Culture

1. Transfer of funds from State Department

a. Elizabeth Wilder – July 1, 1942 – June 30, 1943

b. Verona G. Phillips – November 16, 1942 – March 15, 1943

c. Rae Grace Schwartzenfeld – March 20, 1943 – June 30, 1943

2. From Endowment for Maintenance and Equipment of Hispanic Room

a. Angela Jones – June 5, 1943 – June 30, 1943

D. Secretarial Assistance

1. Rockefeller Grant

a. Helen Buckheimer – July 1, 1942 – November 15, 1942

b. Margaret Nichols – November 21, 1942 0 December 31, 1942

E. Assistance to South American Libraries

1. Rockefeller Grant

a. Ione U. Kidder – July 1, 1942 – June 30, 1943

b. Margaret J. Bates – July 1, 1942 – August 30, 1942

F. Retirements and Deaths

A. Resignations

1. Margaret J. Bates – December 3, 1942

2. Helen S. Bruckheimer – November 15, 1942

3. Miron Burgin – August 2, 1942

4. Estellita Robinett – November 22, 1942

5. Lewis Hanke – November 15, 1942 (for period of approximately 8 months)

6. Margaret A Nichole – December 31, 1942

7. Verona G. Phillips – March 15, 1943

8. Betty A. Purnell – December 31, 1942

9. Rae Grace Schwartzenfeld – June 30, 1943

10. Jeanne K. Williams – September 18, 1942

11. Edith C. Wise – November 19, 1942

12. Pauline Gage – April 5, 1943

B. Retirements

1. C.K. Jones – May 30, 1943

Positions affected by military leave and temporary promotions or appointments

1. Joseph Walsh, Messenger – February 25, 1943

2. James A. Granier – Library Assistant – August 25, 1942

 

Report of Dr. David Rubio Concerning Acquisitions in the Hispanic Foundation for the Fiscal Year 1942-1943

In spite of the difficulties of mail and transportation, the Hispanic Foundation is acquiring a great many items from Hispanic America. We regret to admit that very important material does not arrive from Spain and Portugal, but we hope that the representative of the Library, who is now dividing g his time between these countries, will be industrious enough to continue in the field which I left at the end of 1941.

From the official bibliography of Spain, one of which issues I have seen, I find that they still publish very interesting things in regard to the history and geography of South America, but I am sure we will obtain all these items when circumstances are more favorable. In regard to South America, I can state that we are acquiring many worthwhile items and also many which are not worthwhile.

In regard to the literary production of Argentina and Mexico we can quote Luis Emilio Soto in “Argentina Libre,” January 14, 1943: “The literary balance sheet for 1942 is richer in episodes and anecdotal events than in significant attainments.” Writers did not find the calm needed for the maturing and writing of fiction, Novels by foreign writers were translated at an unusually fast pace, the publishing houses “Sudamericana” and “Salvador Rueda” leading the way.

Among the most memorable fictional works of 1942 by Argentines were Luis María Albamonte’s Puerto América, Augusto Mario Delfino’s Para Olvidarse de la Guerra, and Max Dickmann’s Frutos Amargos. Poetry is well represented by Silvina Ocampo of Enumeración de la Patria and the María Granata of Umbral de tierra, which was awarded the Martín Fierro Prize. Nothing spectacular came from the “younger generation.” From Mexico we might mention Héroes Mayas by Ermilo Abreu Gómez, and Flor de Juegos Antiguos, by Agustín Yánez – which he claims make up for the mediocre showing in the field of the novel. Literary criticism is rather well represented by Alfonso Reyes’ La Antigua Retórica, one of his series devoted to the history of aesthetic ideas, and Ultima Thule, which is “the most beautiful story ever told about the birth of our continent, from the old dreams which foreboded it to its materialization.” We might mention also that Agustín F. Cuenca by Francisco Monterde is perhaps the best contribution in the field of literary criticism. Agustín Yénez’a Fray Bartolomé de las Casas, el Conquistador Conquistado is remarkable biography because of the profound understanding of the drama of this tempestuous man and because of the original technique used by Yánez.

I take pleasure in listing the most important purchased acquisitions of this past year:

  • Sainz y Rodríguez, Pedro. “Historia de la revolución nacional española,” publicada bajo la dirección de don Pedro Sainz Rodríguez. Paris, 1940. 2 vols.
  • Colombo, Cristoforo. “El descubrimiento de América;” diario de navegación. Santiago de Chile, Ediciones Ercilla, 1942.
  • Mann, Erika. “Las luces se apagan.” Santiago de Chile, Ediciones Ercilla, 1942.
  • Abregu Virreira, Carlos.“Idiomas aborígenes de la República argentina.” Buenos Aires, 1941. This is a very erudite work concerning the primitive languages of the Argentine Republic.
  • Salazar, Eduardo. “Problemas americanos.” Santiago de Chile, Ediciones Ercilla, 1942.
  • Millós, Elmer. “Y aquí viven entre nosotros.” Santiago de Chile, Ediciones Ercilla, 1942.
  • Figuerola, José. “Teoría y métodos de estadística del trabajo.” Buenos Aires, 1942.
  • Quiroga, Carlos Buenaventura. “La raza sufrida.” Santiago de Chile, Ediciones Ercilla, 1937.
  • Caballero, Ramón. “Diccionario de modismos de la lengua castellana.” Edición prologada por Eduardo Benot de la Academía Española. La. Ed. Argentina. This is one of the best dictionaries of the Spanish language.
  • Condliffe, John Bell. “La reconstrucción del comercio mundial.” Examen de las relaciones económicas internacionales. Buenos Aires, 1942.
  • Gayer, Arthur David. “Obras públicas en la prosperidad y en la crisis.”
  • Groussac, Paul. “Santiago de Liniers, conde de Buenos Aires.” The best biography of the best ruler of Buenos Aires during Colonial times.
  • Mannheim, Karl. “Libertad y planificación social.”
  • Mondolfo, Rodolfo. “El pensamiento antiguo.” Historia de la filosofía Greco-romana. One of the best histories of philosophy published in Spanish.
  • Quiroga, Adán. “La cruz en América.” Con 107 grabados. Buenos Aires, Editorial Americana, 1942.
  • Cabanellas, G. “Album gráfico de la república del Paraguay,” por G. Cabanellas y A. Paredes. Ilustrado. Asunción, 1941. An illustrated album of Paraguay with very illuminating pictures.
  • Madrazo, Francisco de Paula. “Historia military y política de Zumalecarregui.” Prólogo y notas de Jesús E. Casariego. Ilustrado. Valladolid, España, 1941.
  • Merriman, Roger Bigelow. “Carlos V, El emperador y el imperio español en el Viejo y nuevo mundo.” Obra ilustrada con siete laminas y traducida del ingles por Guillermo Sans Huelín. Buenos Aires, 1940.
  • Ratto, Héctor Raúl. “Historia de Brown.” Prólogo de Abel Chanéton. Campañas de la independencia y del Brasil. Guerras civiles. Retiro del almirante. Ultimos días del almirante. Buenos Aires, 1939. 2 tomos. An interesting historical work on Brazil.
  • Pinard de la Boullaye.“El estudio comparado de las religiones,” ensayo crítico. Tomo I. Madrid, 1940.
  • Alemán, Lucas. Obras completas. México, D.F. Editorial Jus, s.a., 1942-43. 8 tomos. Lucas Alamán is one of the best historians of Mexico.
  • Prampolini, Giacomo. “Historia universal de la literatura.” Traducción de Dante Ponzanelli. Versión española dirigida por José Pijoan y Julio Kiménez Rueda. These thirteen volumes of the history of the literature of the world are filled with sound criticism and magnificent illustrations.
  • Bertolotti, Mario. Alejandro Magno. Antigua Librería Robredo, List, n.d.
  • Zavier, Adro. “El duque de Gandía.” El noble santo del primer imperio. Antigua Librería Robredo, List, n.d.
  • Vicuña, Carlos. “La tiranía en Chile.” Santiago de Vhile, Socidad imp. y lit. Universo, 1939. 2 vols.
  • Levillier, Roberto. “Don Francisco de Toledo: supremo organizador del Perú, su vida y su obra (1515-1582).” The best biography of Francisco de Toledo, founder of the colonial regime in Peru.
  • Rodríguez, Alonso. “Ejercicio de perfección y virtudes crisitanas.” Obra dirigida a los religiosos de la Companía de Jesús. Buenos Aires, 1942.
  • Sánchez-Albornoz y Medina, Claudio. “En torno a los orígenes del feudalismo.” Mendoza, 1942. The author is the best medieval scholar in Hispanic scholarship.
  • Biblioteca popular de cultura colombiana.
  • Biblioteca Argentina de arte Religioso. 4 vols.
  • Academia Nacional de la historia, Buenos Aires. Actas capitulares de Santiago del Estero publicadas por la Academia Nacional de la historia. 2 vols. Buenos Aires, 1942.
  • Arco, Ricardo del. La sociedad española en las obras dramáticas de Lope de Vega. Madrid, 1941. One of the outstanding works on the great Spanish dramatist.
  • Burkhardt, Jacobo. La cultura del Renacimiento en Italia. Con 32 láminas en negro y una en colores, un mapa de Europa y América y in panorama de Florencia. Introducción de R. de la Serna y Espina. Buenos Aires, 1942. Best work on Renaissance so far.
  • Hovre, Frans de. “Pedagogos y pedagogía del catolicismo.” Madrid, 1941.
  • Menendez y Pelayo, Marcelina. “Estudios y discursos de crítica histórica y literaria.” Edición preparada por D. Enrique Sánchez Reyes. Santander, 1942. 7 vols.
  • Scheler, Max. Etica, nuevo ensayo de fundamentación de un personalismo ético. 2 tomos. Madrid, 1941-1942.
  • Unamuno y Jugo, Miguel de. “Antología poética,” selección y prólogo de Luis Felipe Vivanco. Madrid, 1942.
  • Casares y Sanchez, Julio. Diccionario ideológico de la lengua española. Desde la idea a la palabra; desde la palabra a la idea. Barcelona, 1942. Best ideological dictionary of the Spanish Language.
  • Anglós, Higini. La música en la corte de los reyes católicos. Madrid, 1941. Excellent monograph of music during the 15th century in Spain.
  • Santamaría, Francisco Javier. “Diccionario General de Americanismos.” México, 1943. 3 vols. An up-to-date dictionary of Americanisms.
  • Aúnos y Pérez, Eduardo. Historia de las ciudades. Madrid, 1942.
  • Mattingly, Garrett. Catalina de Aragón. (Biografía de esta princesa española, reina de Inglaterra). Buenos Aires, 1942.
  • Castro, Américo. Glosarios latino-españoles de la Edad Media. (Publicación de la Revista de Filología Española). Madrid, 1926.
  • Poesía de la edad media y poesía de tipo tradicional. Selección, prólogo, notas y vocaculario de Damaso Alonso. Buenos Aires, 1942. Outstanding work.
  • Ramirez Gronda, Juan D. “Leyes del trabajo anotadas de la República Argentina y sus reglamentaciones.” Buenos Aires, 1942. Outstanding work.
  • Sepich, Juan R. “Introducción a la filosofía.” Buenos Aires, 1942. Outstanding work.
  • Beneyto Perez, Juan. “España y el problema de Europa; contribución a la historia de la idea de imperio.” Madrid, 1942.
  • Pujiula, Jaime. “Problemas biológicos.” Con 316 figuras. Barcelona, 1941.
  • Mendiondo, Pedro G. “Tramos de acero remachados.” Buenos Aires, 1942.
  • Paret, Prof. L. Victor. “Contabilidad de empresas.” Madrid, 1942.
  • Sáinz Ramírez, José. “Imperios coloniales.” Madrid, 1942.
  • Ratto, Hector Raúl. Rosales (1836-1936).
  • Raum Menendez, Armando. “El motín de los artilleros.” Buenos Aires, 1933.
  • Carriego, Evaristo. “La canción del barrio.” Buenos Aires, 1933.
  • Educación; revista. 27 números en dos tomos encuadernados. Managua, 1918-27.
 

The following items, which are the official documents from the government of Nicaragua are essential for a thorough knowledge of the country’s history:

  • Nicaragua. Para conocimiento del público se dan a luz los nuevos documentos relativos a las dificultades que se presentan para la sanction del proyecto de constitución que ha formado la Asamblea constituyente. León, Nicaragua, Imprenta La Paz, 1818.
  • Nicaragua. Laws, statues, etc. Leyes relamentarias del Supremo tribunal de cuentas y de la contabilidad de hacienda pública de Nicaragua, decretadas el año 1899 por el poder ejecutivo, de conformidad con el derecto legislativo dee 18 octubre del mismo año, y reglamento interior del mismo tribunal. 2a. edición oficial Managua, Tipografía nacional, 1904.
  • Nicaragua. Supremo director. Mensaje del director supremo de Nicaragua, general don Fruto Chamorro, a la Asamblea constituyente del estado, instalada el 22 de enero del año de 1854; y, Discurso pronunciado por el presidente de la misma asambla, lic. Don José María Estrada en el acto de la instalación. Managua, Imprenta de la libertad, 1854.
  • Chile. Departamento de municipalidades. Revista de la municipalidades de la República. 109 números.
  • Biblioteca pedagógica brasileira. São Paulo, Comanhia editora nacional.
  • Borell y Macio, José. Reorganización de empresas industrailes. Barcelona, 1939.
  • Colima, México (State). Memorias administrativeas e informes de los gobernadores. 40 vols. Extremely rare and very valuable government publications.
  • Jalisco, México. El Estado de Jalisco; periódico official. Guadalajara, 1892-1921. 63 vols. Very rare official publications.
  • México, (State). La Ley; gaceta del gobierno. Toluca, 1868-1926.
  • Puebla, México (State). Periódico oficial.
  • Vera Cruz, México (State). Memorias del gobierno, 9 vols.
  • Morelos, México. Gobierno. Memorias, 1873, 1882, 1895/1902. Cuernacaca, 1874-1903. 3 vols.
  • Nuevo León, México. Gobierno. Memorias, 1889, 1891. Monterey, 1890-92. 2 vols.
  • Nuevos León, México. Secretaría de hacienda. Memoria de hacienda de Nuevo León. 1904, 1905, 1906. Monterey, 1905-07. 3 vols.
  • Sinaloa, México (State) Gobierno. Memoria,1890. Culiacán, 1891.
  • Monografía ilustrada de la provincial de Pichincha. Quito, 1922.
  • Forjaz de Sampaio, Albino.Historia da literature portuguesa. Publicacão sob a direccão da Academia das sciencias de Lisboa. Paris. Lisboa, Aillaud B. Bertrand 1928-32.
  • Collection of 35 articles on relations between U.S. and Mexico, Wilson’s Mexican policy, its revolutions, natural resources, etc.
  • Diccionario biográfico de Chile, Santiago, Talleres gráficos “La Nación,” s.a., 1942. This is the best biographical dictionary of Chile. This is the best biographical dictionary of Chile.
  • Fernández de Lizardi, José Joaquín. El Periquillo Sarmiento, por El Pensador Mexicano. 5 vols. México, Imprenta de Calvan a cargo de Mariane Arevale, 1830. This is a rare and the best edition of a famous novel.

 

The Library of Congress received the following outstanding gifts in the past year:

  • Canto a la Gloria del cielo de América por Carlos Ridríquez-Pintos, Fernán Silva Valdés, Carlos Sabat Ercasty, and Emilio Oribe, Montevideo, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Robert S. Benjamin of Washington, D.C.
  • Mexican imprints, 1544-1600, in the Huntington Library. San Marino, 1939. Presented to L.C. by Robert S. Benjamin of Washington, D.C.
  • Apuntes de arquitectura colonial argentina. El Siglo Ilustrado, presented to L.C. by Juan Guiria of Montevideo, Uruguay.
  • Diccionario geografico do Estado de São Paulo por Castão Cesar Bierrenbach Lima. Boletim No. 2. São Pauo, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatistica of São Paulo, Brasil.
  • La Biblia Sagrada, a saber: el antiguo y el nuevo testamento, traducidos de la vulgate de S. Miguel, Obispo electo de Segovia, Nueva edición, Nueva York, 1830. Presented to L.C. by Frances B. Johnston of Washington, D.C.
  • Como se imprime un libro. Buenos Aires, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Frances B. Johnston of Washington, D.C.
  • El standard de vida de las poblaciones de América, por Moisés Poblete Troncoso. Santiago, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Departamento de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Santiago, Chile.
  • Don Diego Barros Arana, por Ramirez Salinas. Santiago, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Departamento de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Santiago, Chile.
  • La moderna asistencia social psiquiátrica, por German Greve, Santiago, 1941. Presented to L.C. by Departamento de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Santiago, Chile.
  • A collection of publications from the Instituto Hispano-Cubano de América. Seville, Spain.
  • The Three volumes entitled Ruy Barbosa, Santo Varão de Republica, and Bernardino de Campos, by Tavares Pinhão. Presented to L.C. by Antonio Tavares Pinhão of Ribeirão preto in Brasil.
  • Escritos pastorales de la Torre, mientras fue Obispo de Riobamba (1919-1927) Tomo Primero. Quito, 1933. 2 vols. Presented to L.C. by Carlos María de la Torre of Quito, Ecuador.
  • “Diario de viaje Talca a Cádiz en 1783,” con una introducción bibliográfica y notas de Rafael A. Soto. Santiago de Chile, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Rafael A. Soto of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
  • “Sueños de Luciano Pulgar,” tomo VI by Fidel Suárez. Bogotá, 1941. Presented to L.C. by Librería Voluntad, s.a. Bogotá, Colombia.
  • “Derechos intelectuales doctrina y legislación,” tesis presentado por Arcadio Plazas. Bogotá, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Librería Voluntad, s.a. Bogotá, Colombia.

 

The following three works by Gomez were presented to L.C. by the Biblioteca de la Universidad Católica Bolivariana, Medellín, Colombia:

    1. La Victoria de Caa Guazu, Corrientes, 1942.
    2. la ciudad de Santo Tomé, Buenos Aires, 1942.
    3. El municipio de Yapeyú, Buenos Aires, 1942.
  • Catálogo de construcciones religiosas del Estado de Hidalgo, recopilación de Justino Fernández. Vol. II, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Departamento de Biblioteca y Archivos, Económicos, México.
  • Diccionario etimológico da lingual portuguesa. Primeira e única edicão, 1932, by Antenor Nascentes. Presented to L.C. by Antenor Nascentes of Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.
  • A collection of official publications presented to L.C. by Biblioteca Nacional of San José, Costa Rica.
  • Memoria de educación pública, by Luis Demetrio Tenoco. San José, 1942. Presented to L.C. by Biblioteca Nacional of San José, Costa Rica.
  • A collection of publications from the Facultad de ciencias médicas of the Universidad nacional de Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • Francia y Bonpland, con apendice documental, by Juan F. Pérez Acosta Buenos Aires, 1942. presented to L.C. by Instituto de Investigaciones históricas de la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras of the Universidad Nacional, Buenos Aires, Argentina.
  • The following works were presented to L.C. by Alfredo Covielllo: El proceso filosófico de Bergson y su bibliografía. 2a ed. 1941. Cumple la Universidad Argentina con la function que le corresponde. Tucumán, 1942.

    The total record of this office for the fiscal year 1942-1943 is as follows:
    Conferences 726
    Telephone requests 686
    Letters 538
    Translations 146
    Memoranda 48

Some of the outstanding visitors who visited this office are as follows:

  • Sr. Subercassaux – Chile
  • Rev. Colonel Tapía – Bolivia
  • Sr. Trinoco – Costa Rica
  • Fr. Pedro Goicoechea – Argentina
  • Fr. Doyle – China
  • Dr. Salinas- Spain and Johns Hopkins
  • Sr. Nuceto Saldí – Venezuela
  • Sr. Garcia Granados – Mexico
  • Sr. McLean – Peru
  • Sr. Arce – Bolivia
  • Sr. Don Juan Beigbeder y Atienza – Former Spanish Minister of State
  • Sr. Ernesto Castillero – Director of the National Library of Panama
  • Sr. Lopez Albujar – Peruvian author of short stories
  • Fr. Olmedo – Mexico
  • Members of the Argentine Press
  • Sr. Juan Ramon Jimenez – Outstanding Spanish Poet
  • Dr. Bonilla Atiles – Dean of Law School of Mexico
  • Sr. Vazquez – Peruvian Consul in New York
  • Sr Carlos Cossio – Peru
  • Dr. Persio Franco – Dominican Republic
  • Sr. Peña – Colombia
  • Dr. Delgado – Colombia
  • Sr. Martinez – Director of Education of Guatemala
  • Sr. Larraya – Ecuador
  • Sr. Escalante – Costa Rican Ambassador
  • Fr. Nuñez – Costa Rica

The following are the outstanding reference requests which have been determined by Dr. David Rubio’s Office:

  • Outstanding similarities and dissimilarities between Spain and Latin America
  • Information on Basque terms – their source and meanings
  • Latest program of studies and their evaluation of the University of San Marcos
  • Information on bull-fights in South America
  • Bibliography of works in English – fiction and non-fiction with South America as a background for college students
  • Sources of many works: Spanish and Portuguese – including publishers, imprints, dates, prices, evaluation, etc.
  • Identification and addresses of outstanding Latin American Societies
  • Bibliography on philosophy and its trends and influences in Latin America – Spanish and English
  • Bibliography on Haitian Tales
  • Spanish translation of Thanitopsis
  • Latin American poetry in English translation – individual poems
  • Best love poems of America in Spanish translation
  • Bibliography of texts on geography of South America – illustrated editions
  • Information on recent trends in Latin America’s economic policy
  • Sources of information on relations between the United States and South America
  • Meanings and sources of technical Spanish words
  • Interpreting Spanish botanical words and their sources
  • Translating judicial terms and phrases
  • Bibliography on Portuguese grammars and texts
  • Bibliography on illustrated Spanish texts for children
  • Bibliography on beginners Spanish for college students
  • Bibliography of Spanish books dealing with Latin American and Mexico for adults
  • Information on the Catholic Church in Spain
  • Bibliography on Spain and the Spanish Civil War
  • Information and texts concerning diplomatic forms and salutations in Spanish
  • Bibliography on Simon Bolívar
  • Information and criticism on Poesias Espirituales by José Manuel Valdés
  • Information concerning the pearl necklace of Queen Isabella of Spain
  • Interpretation of Mexican coat of arms
  • List of outstanding Portuguese dictionaries
  • Information and sources of books on Gabriela Mistral
  • List of outstanding comprehensive books on insects in Spanish
  • Information on outstanding religious shrines in Latin America
  • Biographical and critical information on the outstanding saints and religious figures of Latin America
  • Bibliography of works on Argentina, including history, civilization, etc. in English
  • Information concerning Directorio Panamericano
  • Bibliography on animal life in South America
  • Spanish translation of Washington’s Farewell address
  • List of the best English translations of the works of Santa Teresa de Avila
  • Statistical estimates of Spanish and English speaking people of the world
  • Bibliography on Spanish literature in concise form – Spanish and English
  • Bibliography on the outstanding Spanish technical dictionaries
  • Information concerning edible and non-edible plants of South America
  • Information relative to Latin Americanism
  • Detailed information concerning Biblio del Oso
  • Development of South American poetry compared to that of North America
  • Translations of old Spanish songs
  • Information concerning the earliest universities, newspapers, printed books and Churches of South America
  • Information concerning the political and geographical evaluation of Spain and Peru
  • Information concerning Ladino dialect. Translation of Ladino letters
  • Criticism and description of “Ilustrados” – Puerto Rican publication
  • Sources of Spanish short stories in English translation
  • List of the outstanding South American romances in Spanish
  • List of the outstanding Catholic authors in South America
  • Analysis of the grammatical meaning and structure of “a la que” and “a lo que”
  • Bibliography on the Argentine novel
  • Sources of Spanish editions of works of J. Verne and A. Dumas
  • Identification and information available concerning Bunda
  • Critical bibliography on the dramas of Jacinto Benavente
  • Sources of reference on current research in the field of Spanish literature
  • Critical bibliography on Domingo Faustín Sarmiento
  • Meaning of Augustinian symbols
  • Information concerning Spanish and Portuguese Academies
  • List of geographical readers of Latin America
  • List of outstanding Spanish dictionaries
  • Source of pictures relating to Santa Teresa de Ávila
  • Sources of criticisms on the dramas of Miguel Ramos Carrión and Vital Aza
  • Lists and reference on the national shrines of South America
  • Sources and sketches of the uniforms of the Spanish colonel in 1804
  • List of reference books for methods of teaching Spanish in the high School
  • Critical bibliography on Santa Rosa de Lima
  • List of outstanding historical figures of South America
  • Detailed information concerning Minas Geraes
  • Outstanding histories of South America
  • List of outstanding histories of Mexico
  • Proper salutations for women in Spanish
  • List of Comprehensive books on Argentine culture, civilization, etc. Sources of Spanish and Portuguese translations of the life of Abraham Lincoln
  • Information and sources of Argentine ornithology
  • Critical works and English translation of Quetzalcoatl – Aztec epic poem
  • List of books concerning history, labor, education, etc of Chile
  • Compilation of grammars and texts for teaching English to Spanish speaking people
  • List of the best universal geographies in Spanish
  • Information concerning flag used as standard by Galvez
  • Sources of bibliographical data on translations of non-literary French works into Spanish

Special activities of Dr. David Rubio:

On March 22, 1943, Dr. Rubio made a recording on the “Hispanic Foundation” which was issued by short-wave to Latin America by the Coordinator of Latin-American Affairs.

Dr. David Rubio lectured on “Libraries and the Printing Press in Latin America.”

Dr. Rubio, who is Vice President of the Ibero-American Institute, presided over many of its meetings throughout the year.

Publications of Dr. David Rubio published during the fiscal year 1942-1943

Los Misioneros Españoles
            Published in Universidad Católica Bolivariana.
            Colombia, Medellín. Vol. VIII, Agosto-Septiembre, 1942. p. 422-435.

La Cultura en los Colonias Españoles
            Published in Universidad Católica, Revista de Cultura Mexicana.
            México, D.F. Julio-Septiembre, 1942.- Vol. VI. P. 272-275.

Criticism on El Condenado por Desconfiado
            Published in current issue of Ábside, Revista de Cultura Mexicana.
            México, D.F. Vol. VII, Julio-Septiembre, 1943.

Dr. David Rubio - August 2, 1943
Mr. Mearns, Director of Reference Department

Your memorandum of July 26, I wish to inform you that my report organized along the lines established in the General Order is in the hands of Dr. Lewis Hanke, however if another copy is required, I shall be happy to forward one to you.

 

MEMORANDUM

To Dr. Rubio Consultant
July 28, 1943
Hispanic Literature

Enclosed is a copy of General Order No. 1197 which concerns the report on acquisitions for 1943.
Please let me have your report, organized along the lines established in the General Order, by August 15th.

Davis C. Mearns
Director
Reference Department

The Library of Congress                                                                 General Order No. 1197
Office of the Librarian                                                                                    July 27, 1943

To the Members of the Staff:
REPORT ON ACQUISITIONS FOR 1943

The Annual Report of the Librarian for 1943 will be published in two parts. Part I will contain the general report, including usual statistics of accession; Part II will be comprised exclusively of an account of the important materials acquired by the Library during the fiscal year 1943. This account will be partly by subject (e.g., American History, fine arts) and partly by form (maps, manuscripts). It will attempt to consider additions to all collections of the Library – not only to the special collections but also to the general classified collections.

Mr. David C. Mearns, who has been responsible for the direction of the Library’s acquisitions during this period, is named editor of the report.

The account will be based on the reports of the acquisitions in their special fields which will be made by chiefs of divisions as a part of their annual reports, and on reports specially prepared by recommending officers to cover those parts of the collection which are not ordinarily considered in the reports of particular divisions.

In order that these reports may be uniform in approach it is requested that they be prepared with the following outline in mind:

  1. A brief general evaluation of the acquisitions of the year from the point of view of the Library’s acquisition program and the relation of these acquisitions to the present collections and needs; important lacunae filled.
  2. Consideration and description of major acquisitions; collections acquired, etc.
  3. Lists of important acquisitions.
  4. Items not secured for various reasons – the war, lack of funds, etc.
  5. Plans for the future; wand lists prepared, etc.

 

Archibald MacLeish
The Librarian of Congress

 
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