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The Guide to Jazz in Film Bibliography: D - F


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D

DANCE TO THE MUSIC.
     See FROM JUMPSTREET.

DANCING CO-ED.
     See ARTIE SHAW--TIME IS ALL YOU'VE GOT.

DATE WITH DUKE.
AFI Collection
     George Pal Productions, Inc., 1947.
     Director/Producer: George Pal; Story: Jack Miller;
     Director of Photography: William Snyder; Animator: Gene
     Warren.
     19 mins., black & white, 35mm.                      FEA 8750
A Puppetoon (puppet animation combined with live action) featuring
performing perfume bottles, with guest Duke Ellington playing his
"Perfume Suite" on the piano.  NOTE: LC has black & white copy of
a Technicolor film.

DAVE BRUBECK--LIVE AT THE VINEYARDS.
Copyright Collection
     Vintage Sounds, 1982.
     Director: Vincent Casalaina; Executive Producers: Lee
     Callister, Steve Michelson, Jeffrey Nemerovski; Producer:
     Michael Siporin; Associate Producer: Tim Curry.
     59 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 5011
A concert video taped live at the Paul Masson Winery, featuring
Dave Brubeck with Jerry Berganzi, Chris Brubeck and Randy Jones. 
Includes the numbers "Black and Blue," "Music Maestro Please,"
"Paper Moon," "Peace of Jerusalem," "Rhapsody," "St. Louis Blues,"
"Take Five" and "Tritonus," as well as excerpts of an interview and
a performance of "Take Five" on Jazz Casual with Ralph Gleason. 
Interviews with Brubeck and his son cover the topics of technology
vs. "soul," "classical" training and Brubeck's demands.  SEE ALSO
Jazz Casual.

DAYBREAK EXPRESS.
     See RECORD MAKING WITH DUKE ELLINGTON AND HIS ORCHESTRA.

DECOY.
Copyright Collection
     CBS Inc., 1984.
     4 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                 VBC 0987
A music video performed by Miles Davis.

THE DEFINITIVE SINATRA.
Copyright Collection
     All Star Video Corporation, 1980.
     120 mins., color/black & white, 1/2" videocassette. VAA 0362
Excerpts from the CBS television series the Frank Sinatra Show,
which ran from 1950-52.  SEE ALSO The Golden Classics of Jazz. 
Sinatra and Friends.

DIANE SCHUUR AND THE COUNT BASIE ORCHESTRA.
Copyright Collection
     A Stanley Dorfman/Visual Eyes Production/Video Arts Japan,
Inc., 1987.
     Director/Producer: Stanley Dorfman.
     51 mins., color, 1/2" videocassette.                VAC 0677
A Japanese production of the performance that won Schuur the Grammy
Award for Best Female Jazz Vocalist.  Filmed in Los Angeles after
a Japanese tour by Schuur and the Count Basie Orchestra, they
perform "I Loves You Porgy," "Only You," "Travellin' Light" and
"We'll Be Together Again."  

DIFFERENT DRUMMER--ELVIN JONES.
NEA Collection
     Edward Gray Films, Inc./Rhapsody Films, 1979.
     Director/Producer: Edward Gray; Editors: Janet Swanson, Edward
Gray; Photographers: Don Lenzer, John Lindley, Fred Murphy, Mark
Obenhaus, Richard Pearce, Nancy Schreiber.
     29 mins., color, 16mm.                              FCB 2906
This film documents the background and style of jazz drummer Elvin
Jones through an exploration of his imagination in tracing the
origin, arrangement, and performance of his original composition
"Three Card Molly."  His quartet performs the piece at the Village
Vanguard.  In his hometown of Pontiac, Michigan, he discusses his
early career, illustrated with a television excerpt of John
Coltrane performing.  Bassist Ron Carter assesses Jones's impact in
an interview, and the film concludes with a studio performance of
"Three Card Molly" featuring Pat LaBarbera.

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS.
     See OMNIBUS.  V, Vol. 9.
 
DINAH.
     See THE MILLS BROTHERS STORY.

THE DIVINE ONE AND ONLY SARAH VAUGHAN.
     See ESSENCE.  No. 94.

DIXIELAND JAMBOREE.
Copyright Collection
     The Vitaphone Corp., 1946.
     Producer: Gordon Hollingshead.
     10 mins., black & white, 16mm.                      FAA 5949
A music short featuring Cab Calloway and his Orchestra ("Some of
These Days"), the Five Racketeers ("I Don't Know Why I Feel This
Way" and "Tiger Rag" with Eunice Wilson), Adelaide Hall ("To Have
You, To Hold You, To Love You"), the Nicholas Brothers and the
Three Whippets dancing to "Nagasaki."

DIZZY GILLESPIE.
LC Purchase Collection
     Flower Films, 1965.
     Director/Camera/Editor: Les Blank; Producer: Michael
     Vidor; Jazz Consultant: Charles M. Weisenberg.
     24 mins., black & white, 16mm.                      FBB 8169
Les Blank's earliest music film focuses on Dizzy Gillespie, who,
along with Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk and others, sparked the
change from swing to bop in the Forties.  In interviews he
discusses his beginnings and music theories.  Onstage at the
Lighthouse in Hermosa Beach he plays with his quintet, comprised of
Kenny Barron, Rudy Collins, James Moody and Chris White, also with
John Levine and Howard Rumsey.  He is also seen in rehearsal and
concert with the Stan Kenton Neophonic Orchestra.

DIZZY GILLESPIE--A NIGHT IN TUNISIA.
Copyright Collection
     Kingfisher Films Productions, 1980.
     Director: Bryan Elsom.
     28 mins., color, 1/2" videocassette.                VAB 6321
Showcasing Gillespie and his composition, this program explores how
he wrote the seminal composition of bebop.  This film constitutes
a document of a single concert performance, with allusion made to
his 1947 Carnegie Hall performance with Ella Fitzgerald and Charlie
Parker.  Other than portions of a rehearsal, "A Night in Tunisia"
is the only music on the soundtrack.  In interview, Gillespie
recalls when he first arrived in New York in 1942 and the night he
wrote his set piece.  Leonard Feather analyzes the rhythms of bebop
with piano demonstrations, Gillespie protege Jon Faddis and Dizzy
Gillespie himself.  LC copy is a V.I.E.W. Video reissue from 1990.

DIZZY GILLESPIE IN CUBA.
     See A NIGHT IN HAVANA.

DO YOU KNOW ME?  Sarah Vaughan.
     See [AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVELLERS CHEQUES].

DON REDMAN AND HIS ORCHESTRA.
United Artists Collection
     Vitaphone Corp., 1934.
     Director: Joseph Henabery.
     10 mins., black & white, 35mm.         Ref. copy forthcoming
A music short set in a Hollywood nightclub featuring the title act
with Harlan Lattimore on vocals performing "Ill Wind," "Nagasaki,"
"Why Should I Be Tall" and "Yeah Man," with Red and Struggle
tapdancing.  Personnel: Bob Carrol, Shirley Clay, Rupert Cole,
Langston Curl, Sidney De Paris, Edward Inge, Quentin Jackson,
Manzie Johnson, Don Kirkpatrick, Benny Morton, Don Redman, Talcott
Reeves, Gene Simon and Bob Ysaguirre. 

DOWN YONDER.
AFI/Myrick Collection
     Snader Telescriptions, 1952.
     3 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FBC 4389
Jack Teagarden and the Jud Conlon Singers interpret the title
number.  On reel with other Snader Telescriptions.

THE DOWNBEAT JAZZ AWARDS.
     See SOUNDSTAGE.

DOWNBEAT REVUE.
     See SHOWTIME AT THE APOLLO.

A DRUM IS A WOMAN.
     See PERSON TO PERSON. Ellington/Zorach--Excerpt, THE
     UNITED STATES STEEL HOUR and/or WIDE WIDE WORLD. 
     American Riches.

DRY BONES.
     See TOOT THAT TRUMPET.

THE DUKE.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     CBC Television, 1965.
     Director/Producer: Paddy Sampson.
     Telecast: CBC, March 3, 1965.
     55 mins., black & white, 1/2" videocassette.        VAB 6799
A documentary consisting of interviews and musical numbers shot in
early September 1964, of Duke Ellington and his Orchestra
performing "Agra," "Amad," "Banquet Scene from Timon of Athens,"
"The Blues," "Bluebird of Delhi," "David Danced Before the Lord,"
"Happy-Go-Lucky Local," "Jam with Sam," "Kinda Dukish," "My
Heritage," "My Mother, My Father," "My People," "Poem," "Rockin' in
Rhythm," "Skillipoop" and "Soda Fountain Rag."  Interviews by Bying
Whittaker, with appearances by Bunny Briggs and Joya Sherrill.  A
Canadian production.

THE DUKE--CONVERSATION IN MUSIC.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     CBC Television, 1984.
     Director/Producer: Paddy Sampson.
     55 mins., black & white, 1/2" videocassette.        VAB 6800
An informal interview with Duke Ellington, with generally brief
musical performances of "Do Nothing `til You Hear from Me," "Don't
You Know I Care?," "East St. Louis Toodle-oo," "I'm Just a Lucky
So-and-so," "My Heritage," "My People," "Prelude to a Kiss," "Soda
Fountain Rag," "Someone" and "What Are You Gonna Do When the Bed
Breaks Down?"  Although shot on September 2, 1964 as the rehearsal
for The Duke, it was not shown as a separate program until 1984. 
LC copy is part of the celebration Rearview Mirror--30 Years of CBC
Television.  A Canadian production.  

DUKE ELLINGTON AND FRIENDS.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     WHA Radio Madison/WMVS-TV Milwaukee/University of Wisconsin
School of Music, 1972.
     Director/Producer: Dave Gallagher.
     75 mins., color, 1/2" videocassette.                VAB 6809
Highlights of a seminar given at the University of Wisconsin by
Duke Ellington and musicians associated with him, such as Richard
"Two-Ton" Baker, Paul Gonsalves and Brooks Kerr.  Numbers include
"Carolina Shout," "Dancers in Love," "Happy Reunion," "I'm Afraid
of Loving You Too Much" and "Soda Fountain Rag."  Filmed in
Madison, Wisconsin on July 20-21, 1972.  

DUKE ELLINGTON AND HIS FAMOUS ORCHESTRA.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     Granada TV, 1963.
     Director: Eric Price; Producer: Peter Wilderblood.
     Telecast: British television, February 13, 1963.
     45 mins., black & white, 1/2" videocassette.        VAB 6802
A British television documentary with a rare appearance by Billy
Strayhorn playing with the Orchestra, including performances of the
numbers "Angu," "C-Jam Blues," "Crescendo in Blue," "Diminuendo,"
"Don't Get Around Much Anymore," "The Eighth Veil," "Mood Indigo,"
"Rockin' in Rhythm," "Single Petal of a Rose" and "Take the A
Train."  

DUKE ELLINGTON AND HIS FAMOUS ORCHESTRA.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     NHK-TV, 1972.
     30 mins., color, 1/2" videocassette.                VAB 6807
Duke Ellington and his Orchestra give a performance partially
accompanied in English by Japanese singers.  The show is
interspersed with brief interviews in both English and Japanese
through either subtitling or simultaneous translation.  Songs
include "C Jam Blues," "Caravan," "Meditation," "Perdido," "Rockin'
in Rhythm," "Satin Doll," "Sophisticated Lady" and "Take the A
Train."  Recorded January 7, 1972 in Japan.  

DUKE ELLINGTON AND HIS ORCHESTRA.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     RKO Pathe, 1943.
     Director: Jay Bonafield; Producer: Frederic Ullman, Jr.
     9 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FAB 6239
The seventh of the RKO Pathe Jamboree shorts series, with
performances of "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," "It Don't Mean a
Thing," "Mood Indigo" and "Sophisticated Lady."  Recorded at the
Movietone Studios in New York during the week of June 22-27, 1943.

[DUKE ELLINGTON AND OTHERS ON DANISH TELEVISION].
     See [UNIDENTIFIED VALBURN/ELLINGTON.  No. 3].

DUKE ELLINGTON AT THE COTE D'AZUR.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     NET, 1966.
     Director: Alexander Arens; Producer/Script: Norman Granz.
     34 mins., black & white, 1/2" videocassette.        VAB 6795
Produced as a television special and shot during Duke Ellington's
visit to the seventh annual jazz festival held jointly by the
communities of Antibes and Juan-les-Pins on July 28, 1966.  Numbers
include "Black and Tan Fantasy," "Creole Love Call," "Crescendo in
Blue," "The Mooche," "The Old Circus Train Turn-Around Blues," "La
Plus Belle Africaine," "The Shepherd (Who Watches Over the Night
Flock)," "Something to Live For," "Soul Call," "Such Sweet
Thunder," "Things Ain't What They Used to Be" and "Tingling is a
Happiness."  A Calder mobile and Giacometti sculptures figure
prominently, put in motion through cutting to Ellington's music. 
Joan Miro appears guiding Ellington around the Fondation Maeght in
St. Paul de Vence, near Cannes, on July 27, 1966.  SEE ALSO The
Golden Classics of Jazz.  The Duke Ellington Story.  
     
DUKE ELLINGTON AT THE WHITE HOUSE.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     United States Information Agency, 1969.
     Producer: Sidney J. Stiber.
     18 mins., color, 1/2" videocassette.                VAB 6797
Records the ceremony at the White House on April 29, 1969
(Ellington's seventieth birthday) during which he played a special
piano solo entitled "Pat" and was awarded the Medal of Freedom by
President Richard Nixon.  Appearances by "Shorty" Baker, Louis
Bellson, Dave Brubeck, Cab Calloway, Stanley Dance, Paul Desmond,
Billy Eckstine, Mercer Ellington, Leonard Feather, Leonard Garment,
Dizzy Gillespie, Paul Gonsalves, Benny Goodman, Urbie Green, Jim
Hall, Earl "Fatha" Hines, Milt Hinton, J. J. Johnson, Hank Jones,
Marian McPartland, Gerry Mulligan, Lou Rawls, Willie "The Lion"
Smith, Billy Taylor, Clark Terry, George Wein and Joe Williams. 
With commentary by Willis Conover.  Numbers include: "Caravan,"
"Freedom," "Happy Birthday," "Happy-Go-Lucky Local," "In a
Sentimental Mood," "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That
Swing)," "Jump for Joy," "Mood Indigo," "Pat," "Perdido," "Stormy
Monday Blues," "Take the A Train" and "When the Saints Go Marching
In."  

DUKE ELLINGTON IN DER SCHWEIZ.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     Fernsehen DRS, 1985.
     Adaptation: Beat Hirt; Original Commentary: Jan Slawe.
     75 mins., color/black & white, 1/2" videocassette.  VAB 6832
Performed on October 9, 1959 in the Kongresshaus of Zurich,
Switzerland, the Duke orchestrates "All of Me," "Black and Tan
Fantasy," "The Blues," "Creole Love Call," "El Gato," "Hank Sank,"
"I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart," "The Mooche," "Rockin' in
Rhythm," "Satin Doll," "Such Sweet Thunder" and "Take the A Train." 
This video represents the sole visual document of singer Lil
Greenwood with the Ellington band.

DUKE ELLINGTON--LOVE YOU MADLY.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     KQED San Francisco/National Educational Television, 1967.
     Director: Richard Moore; Executive Producer: Lane Slate;
     Producers: Richard Moore, Ralph J. Gleason. 
     Telecast: June 14, 1967.
     45 mins., black & white, 16mm.                      FDA 9258
Documentary filmed over the course of two months in 1965 at Basin
Street West in North Beach, Coast Recorders, the Fairmont Hotel and
Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, and at the 1966 Monterey Jazz
Festival.  Shown backstage or relaxing with friends such as Bunny
Briggs, Dizzy Gillespie, Jon Hendricks and Earl "Fatha" Hines,
Ellington shares his tour.  The following selections appear in
fragments, or have been obscured by voiceover commentary: "Come
Sunday," "David Danced Before the Lord," "Far East Suite," "In the
Beginning God," "The Lord's Prayer," "Love Came," "Rockin' in
Rhythm," "Sugar Hill Penthouse," "Take the A Train" and "Things
Ain't What They Used to Be."  Solos by Cat Anderson, Bunny Briggs,
Lawrence Brown, Buster Cooper, Duke Ellington, Paul Gonsalves,
Jimmy Hamilton, Jon Hendricks, Johnny Hodges, Esther Marrow, Herman
McCoy Choir, Russell Procope and Cootie Williams.  Nominated for an
Emmy. SEE ALSO A Concert of Sacred Music and Jazz Profiles--Joe
Williams.
     
[DUKE ELLINGTON PIANO SOLOS AND COMMENTARY].
     See [UNIDENTIFIED VALBURN/ELLINGTON.  No. 1].

DUKE ELLINGTON--REMINISCING IN TEMPO.
     See AMERICAN EXPERIENCE.

THE DUKE ELLINGTON STORY.
     See THE GOLDEN CLASSICS OF JAZZ.

DUKE ELLINGTON SWINGS THROUGH JAPAN.
     See THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.

DUKE ELLINGTON--YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW.
     See A DUKE NAMED ELLINGTON.

DUKE ELLINGTON'S A DRUM IS A WOMAN.
     See THE UNITED STATES STEEL HOUR.

THE DUKE IS TOPS.
     See JAZZ CLASSICS.  No. 112.

A DUKE NAMED ELLINGTON.
Copyright Collection
     Council for Positive Images, Inc./American Masters-
     WNET/Videfilm Producers International, 1988.
     Director/Producer/Editor/Narrator: Terry Carter; Co-
     Producer/Screenwriter: Leonard Malone.
     110 mins., color/black & white, 1/2" videocassette. VAC 6776
An exploration of Duke Ellington's career as a composer,
bandleader, pianist and entertainer.  Includes footage from
Ellington's November 7, 1971 concerts in Copenhagen, Denmark, at
which Ben Webster was reunited with his former colleagues.  Also
telecast on the PBS series American Masters.

E

EARLY JAZZ.
     See FROM JUMPSTREET and/or THE SUBJECT IS JAZZ.

ECHOES OF ELLINGTON.  Parts 1 and 2.
     See JAZZVISIONS.

THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW--Excerpt.
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     CBS-TV, Inc., 1959.
     Co-Producers: Marlowe Lewis, Ed Sullivan.
     Telecast: CBS, June 28, 1959.
     6 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FAB 6266
In a segment of the program devoted to the feature Anatomy of a
Murder, Ed Sullivan introduces Duke Ellington, who had just
completed the score for the film.  After Ellington plays fragments
of "Flirtibird" and "Happy Anatomy," Sullivan introduces two
audience members: Otto Preminger, the director of the film, and
Joseph N. Welsh, a Boston attorney who plays a role in the film. 
SEE ALSO Anatomy of a Murder.

EIGHT TO THE BAR.
     See JAZZ CLASSICS.  No. 105.

ELECTRIC WORKSHOP.
     See CHICK COREA.

ELLA AND JOBIM.
     See A MAN AND HIS MUSIC.

ELLA FITZGERALD IN CONCERT.
     See THE GOLDEN CLASSICS OF JAZZ.

[ELLINGTON, DUKE--COMMERCIAL PROMOTION FOR TIME MAGAZINE].
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     Time, Inc., 1956.
     5 mins., black & white, 1/2" videocassette.         VAB 6805
A spot promoting Duke Ellington's cover story in the August 20,
1956 issue of Time.  To publicize the story Ellington comments on
his work in reference to the article, with a score which includes
"Caravan," "Mood Indigo," "Satin Doll" and "Sophisticated Lady."

[ELLINGTON, DUKE--RECEIVING AWARD AT THE FRENCH EMBASSY IN NEW
YORK].
Valburn/Ellington Collection
     Production company unknown, [1970].
     5 mins., black & white, 1/2" videocassette.         VAB 6805
Duke Ellington receives a medal, intercut with Ellington's own
commentary, shots of skyscrapers, of a concert, and of other
musicians, including Louis Armstrong.  Probably an excerpt from a
longer film.  

ELLINGTON--THE MUSIC LIVES ON.
     See GREAT PERFORMANCES.

ERNIE ANDREWS--BLUES FOR CENTRAL AVENUE.
Copyright Collection
     Lois Shelton Productions, 1986.
     Director/Producer/Editor/Compiler/Researcher: Lois
     Shelton; Camera: Bill Foster.
     50 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBG 1011
Presents the music and confessions of jazz singer Ernie Andrews as
he recalls his career, beginning in the Los Angeles black music
scene of the Forties and Fifties on Central Avenue, known as the
Harlem of the West at the time.  The archetypal story of a man who
had it all early on, and lost it all shortly thereafter, Andrews'
first hit came in high school, and his last ("Don't Let the Sun
Catch You Cryin'") while still in his teens.  He reveals his being
blackballed by the music industry for consulting a lawyer as the
victim of a bad contract.  Much of the hour is devoted to
reminiscences of places like the Club Alabam and the Jungle Room,
with commentary by his contemporaries Buddy Collette, Harry
"Sweets" Edison and Herb Jeffries.

ERRAND BOY FOR RHYTHM.
     See JAZZ CLASSICS.  Nos. 106 and/or 111.

ESSENCE.  No. 18.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc./Anchor Production, Inc.,
1985.
     Director: Sandra Weir; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Dean Radcliffe-Smith.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBD 8196
Syndicated series, based on the magazine of the same name and aimed
at black women.  This episode includes a segment with Herbie
Hancock.  Hosted by the magazine's editor, Susan L. Taylor.

ESSENCE.  No. 19.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc./Anchor Production,
     Inc., 1985.
     Director/Writer: Sandra Weir; Executive Producer:
     Kathleen S. M. Shepherd; Producer: Dean Radcliffe-Smith.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBD 5416
This episode includes a tribute to the Modern Jazz Quartet.  

ESSENCE.  No. 21.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc./Anchor Production,
     Inc., 1985.
     Director: Sandra Weir; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Dean Radcliffe-Smith; Writer: Joy Thomas
     Moore.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBD 8220
This episode includes a segment with Wynton Marsalis.  

ESSENCE.  No. 45.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1986.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame; Co-Producer: Lynn Redmond
     Sherriffe; Writer: Joy Thomas Moore.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBE 1892
This episode includes a segment with violinist Noel Pointer.  

ESSENCE.  No. 48.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1986.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame; Co-Producer: Lynn Redmond
     Sherriffe; Writer: Joy Thomas Moore.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBE 1892
This episode is devoted to the life and career of Ella Fitzgerald. 


ESSENCE.  No. 63.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1986.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame; Co-Producer: Lynn Redmond
     Sherriffe; Writer: Joy Thomas Moore.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBE 5290
This episode includes segments with Carmen McRae and Wynton
Marsalis.  

ESSENCE.  No. 65.  
Copyright Collection 
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1987.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame; Co-Producer: Lynn Redmond
     Sherriffe.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBF 7198
This episode is devoted to the life and career of singer and
bandleader Billy Eckstine.  

ESSENCE.  No. 71.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1987.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame; Co-Producer: Lynn Redmond
     Sherriffe.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBF 5831
This episode includes a segment with Wynton Marsalis.  

ESSENCE.  No. 75.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1987.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBF 3634
This episode includes an appearance by Lena Horne.  

ESSENCE.  No. 86.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1988.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame.
     29 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBF 3634
This episode includes a segment featuring singers Ella Fitzgerald,
Carmen McRae and Nancy Wilson.  

ESSENCE.  No. 94, The Divine One and Only Sarah Vaughan.  
Copyright Collection 
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1988.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producers: Gene A. Davis, Angela Thame; Writer: Gene
     A. Davis.
     30 mins., color/black & white, 3/4" videocassette.  VBF 4403
This episode is devoted to the life and career of Sarah Vaughan.  

ESSENCE.  No. 97.
Copyright Collection
     Essence Television Productions, Inc., 1988.
     Director: Linda Howard; Executive Producer: Kathleen S. M.
     Shepherd; Producer: Angela Thame.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBF 6657
This episode includes a tribute to John Coltrane, who is shown
playing "A Love Supreme."  

EUBIE BLAKE--A CENTURY OF MUSIC.
     See KENNEDY CENTER TONIGHT.

[EUBIE BLAKE AT THE PIANO].
AFI/Zouary Collection
     [DeForest Phonofilms, 1923?].
     7 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FAB 1823
Features Eubie Blake at the piano playing two different versions of
"Swanee River," in one of the first appearances of a black artist
in a sound film.  The film was produced using the Phonofilm system,
a method of recording sound onto film, invented by Lee DeForest in
1920.   

EVENING AT POPS.  
LC Off-Air Taping Collection
     Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc./WGBH Educational
     Foundation/Mugar Productions, Inc., 1987.
     Directors: David Atwood, William N. Cosel, Richard
     Heller; Executive Producer: William N Cosel; Editor:
     Janet McFadden; Videotape Editors: Mark Steele, Jim
     Deering.
     58 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBG 9541
A compilation of concert performances from the series, including
those of Tony Bennett ("Don't Get Around Much Anymore" and "Just in
Time"), George Benson ("On Broadway"), Nell Carter ("The Man I
Love" and "Take It Home"), Toots Thielemans ("Bluesette" and "Theme
from Midnight Cowboy") and Sarah Vaughan with Wynton Marsalis
("September Song").  The Boston Pops Orchestra conducted by John
Williams accompany the performers, as well as performing "Overture
to Donna Diana," "Strike Up the Band," "That's Entertainment" and
"A Tribute to Duke Ellington" (arranged by Ralph Burns).  SEE ALSO
Sarah Vaughan and Toots Thielemans in this series.     

EVENING AT POPS.  Buddy Rich.
Copyright Collection
     WGBH/Mugar Productions, Inc., 1981.
     Director/Producer: William N. Cosel.
     60 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBE 9465
Buddy Rich plays a medley from "West Side Story" and Gershwin's
"Strike Up the Band" with the support of John Williams and the
Boston Pops Orchestra.

EVENING AT POPS.  Doc Severinsen.
Copyright Collection
     WGBH Boston, 1970.
     Director/Producer: William N. Cosel.
     60 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBE 9463
Doc Severinsen plays William Lovelock's Concerto for Trumpet with
the Boston Pops Orchestra, as well as Schubert's "Marche Militaire"
and selections from Carousel.

EVENING AT POPS.  Sarah Vaughan.
Copyright Collection
     Boston Symphony Orchestra/WGBH Boston, 1985.
     Director: David Atwood; Producer: William N. Cosel.
     60 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBE 9462
Wynton Marsalis joins Sarah Vaughan as she sings "Body and Soul,"
"Send in the Clowns" and "September Song," among others.  Marsalis
plays Haydn's Concerto in E-flat for Trumpet and Orchestra with
John Williams and the Boston Pops Orchestra as well.

EVENING AT POPS.  Shearing and Torme.
Copyright Collection
     WGBH Boston/Mugar Productions, Inc., 1970.
     Director: David Atwood; Producer: William N. Cosel.
     58 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBF 6790
The George Shearing Quintet appear as guests of Arthur Fiedler and
the Boston Pops Orchestra, performing "Both Sides Now," "Lullaby of
Birdland" and "Snowfalls."  Shearing also plays the Andante and
Presto movements from Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 23 in A major (K
488), as well as "Scheherezade" and "What Kind of Fool Am I?"  

EVENING AT POPS.  Toots Thielemans.
Copyright Collection
     Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc./WGBH Educational
     Foundation, 1981.
     Director/Producer: William N. Cosel.
     60 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBE 9461
Toots Thielemans performs the jazz waltz "Bluesette," solos on
guitar with a version of "the Mooche," as well as whistling the
themes to Cinderella Liberty and Midnight Cowboy.

EVERYBODY'S JUMPIN' NOW.
AFI/Myrick Collection
     Filmcraft Productions/Soundies Distributing Corp. of
     America, Inc., 1946.
     Director/Producer: William Forest Crouch.
     3 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FCB 2730
Performed by Noble Sissle and his Orchestra with Mabel Lee.  On
reel with several other Soundies.  SEE ALSO Jazz Classics.  No.
110.

EVERYDAY IS SATURDAY IN HARLEM.
     See JAZZ CLASSICS.  No. 105.

EYEWITNESS.  The New Beat.
Copyright Collection
     CBS News, 1962.
     Director: Russ Bensley; Producer: John Sharnik.
     Telecast: CBS, December 28, 1962.
     28 mins., black & white, 16mm.                      FCA 2537
Reporters Charles Collingwood and Charles Kuralt survey the
origins, development and impact in the United States of
contemporary Brazilian music, including the bossa nova, which
combines elements of progressive American jazz and the Brazilian
samba.  Includes performances by Brazilian musicians Joao Gilberto
and Antonio Carlos Jobim, and American jazz musicians Gerry
Mulligan and Stan Getz.

F

THE FABULOUS DORSEYS.
AFI/Knight Collection
     United Artists, 1947.
     Director: Alfred E. Green; Producer: Charles Rogers; Associate
     Producer: John W. Rogers; Original Screenplay: Richard
     English, Art Arthur, Curtis Kenyon..
     89 mins., black & white, 16mm.                   FDA 6422-23
A fictionalized biography of the two brothers, played by
themselves, with many numbers from their repertoire including
"Art's Blues," "Dorsey Concerto," "Green Eyes," "Marie," "Never Say
Never" and "The Object of My Affections."  Both the Jimmy Dorsey
Orchestra and the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra (with Abe Most and Alvin
Stoller) appear with guests Henry Busse, Ray Eberle, Stuart Foster,
Helen O'Connell, Mike Pingatore and Paul Whiteman.  A jam session
sequence features Charlie Barnet, Ray Bauduc, the Dorseys, Ziggy
Elman and Art Tatum.  SEE ALSO The Golden Classics of Jazz.  The
Best of Jazz, Vol. I and Jazz Legends. 

LA FEERIE DU JAZZ.
     See KING OF JAZZ.

FEET DON'T FAIL ME NOW.
     See AMERICAN PATCHWORK--SONGS AND STORIES OF AMERICA. 
     No. 101.

FIDDLER'S DREAM.
Copyright Collection
     MT Productions/Kansas City Jazz Commission, 1987.
     Director: W. Stinson McClendon; Producers: W. Stinson
     McClendon, Rodney M. Thompson; Consultant: Erv Parthe.
     24 mins., color, 1/2" videocassette.                VAB 0125
Documentary on the life and music of Claude "Fiddler" Williams, not
well known in the United States but widely acclaimed in Europe.  He
played with T. Holder's Band, Andy Kirk's Clouds of Joy and was the
first guitar player in the Basie Band.  Includes interviews with
Stephane Grappelli, Andy Kirk, Jay McShann, Milton Morris and "Big"
Joe Turner.

FIVE GUYS NAMED MOE.
AFI/Myrick Collection
     Soundies Distributing Corp. of America, Inc., 1942.
     3 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FBC 4368
Performed by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five.  On reel with
several other Soundies.

FIVE GUYS NAMED MOE--THE BEST OF LOUIS JORDAN AND HIS TYMPANY
FIVE.
Copyright Collection
     Vintage Jazz Classics Ltd., 1991.
     Compiler: Shorty Nadine.
     60 mins., black & white, 1/2" videocassette.        VAB 8597
A compilation of excerpts from Soundies and shorts from 1942 to
1960 featuring Jordan and various incarnations of the Tympany Five. 
With William Austin, Dallas Bartley, Eddie Byrd, Wild Bill Davis,
Carl Hogan, Aaron Izenhall, Josh Jackson, Walter Martin, Alex
"Razz" Mitchell, Al Morgan, Joe "Chris Columbus" Morris, Ronald
Reagan, Eddie Roane, Jesse "Po" Simpkins, the Swing Maniacs dance
team, Arnold Thomas, Shadow Wilson and James Wright.  Songs include
"Ain't That Just Like a Woman?," "Beware!," "Buzz Me," "Caldonia,"
"Choo Choo Ch'Boogie," "Don't Worry `Bout That Mule," "Five Guys
Named Moe," "Fuzzy Wuzzy," "The Green Grass Grows All Around,"
"Honey Chile," "If You Can't Smile and Say Yes," "Is You Is or Is
You Ain't (Ma Baby)," "Jumpin' at the Jubilee," "Let the Good Times
Roll," "Ration Blues," "Reet, Petite and Gone," "Salt Pork, West
Virginia," "Texas and Pacific," "That Chick's Too Young to Fry,"
"That'll Just About Knock Me Out" and "Tillie."  SEE ALSO Caldonia
and Jazz Classics.  No. 105.

THE FIVE PENNIES.
Copyright Collection
     Dena Pictures, Inc./Paramount Pictures Corp., 1959.
     Director: Melville Shavelson; Producer: Jack Rose; Screenplay:
     Jack Rose, Melville Shavelson; Story: Robert Smith.
     123 mins., color, 35mm.                          FGA 3808-18
A semi-biographical film suggested by the life of Loring "Red"
Nichols, played by Danny Kaye with Barbara Bel Geddes and Tuesday
Weld.  There are appearances by Ray Anthony (playing Jimmy Dorsey),
Louis Armstrong, Danny Barcelona, Curtis Counce, Bob Crosby, Ray
Daly, "Peanuts" Hucko, Clyde Hurley, Billy Kyle, Shelly Manne
(playing Dave Tough), Bobby Troup, Joe Venuti and Trummy Young. 
Glenn Miller and Artie Shaw are also represented onscreen.  Numbers
include "Bill Bailey," "The Five Pennies," "Follow the Leader,"
"Indiana," "Lullaby in Ragtime," "My Blue Heaven," "Runnin' Wild,"
"The Saints," "The Wail of the Winds" and "Washington and Lee
Swing."   

FLAVORS OF THE OLD AND NEW.
     See CAMERA THREE.  The Modern Jazz Quartet.

FOLLOW THAT MUSIC.
United Artists Collection
     RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., 1946.
     Director: Arthur Dreifuss; Producer: George Bilson;
     Screenplay: Russ Green; Editor: Edward W. Williams.
     18 mins., black & white, 35mm.                      FGE 7095
A musical Featurette highlighting Gene Krupa and his Orchestra with
Marty Napoleon, who perform "Boogie Blues," "Dark Eyes," "Opus 145"
and "Up and Atom."

FOLLOW THE BOYS.
Copyright Collection
     Charles K. Feldman Productions/Universal Pictures Corp., 1944.
     Director: Eddie Sutherland; Screenplay: Lou Breslow, Gertrude
     Purcell; Editor: Fred R. Feltshans, Jr.; Camera: David Abel.
     102 mins., black & white, 3/4" videocassettes.   VBH 605-06 
An all star tribute to the USO camp shows with many top stars like
Marlene Dietrich, W.C. Fields, Jeanette MacDonald, Donald O'Connor,
George Raft, Dinah Shore and Orson Welles.  Includes the orchestras
of Ted Lewis, Freddie Slack and Charlie Spivak, as well as the
Delta Rhythm Boys and Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five performing
"Is You Is or Is You Ain't (Ma Baby)" and "Sweet Georgia Brown." 
Other numbers include "Andrews Sisters Medley," "Besame Mucho," "A
Better Day Is Coming," "Beyond the Blue Horizon," "The Bigger the
Army and Navy," "Furlough Fling," "Good Night," "The House I Live
In," "I Feel a Song Coming On," "I'll Get By," "I'll See You in My
Dreams," "I'll Walk Alone," "Kittens with Their Mittens Laced,"
"Liebestraum," "Mad About Him Blues," "Merriment," "Shoo Shoo
Baby," "Some of These Days," "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot" and
"Tonight."  NOTE: Twenty minutes from the LC's copy are missing
because of deterioration in the nitrate original.

FOR AULD LANG SYNE.
     See JAZZ PROFILES--JOE WILLIAMS.

FOR THE RECORD.
     See ANITA ELLIS.

FOUR OR FIVE TIMES.
AFI/Myrick Collection
     Soundies Distributing Corp. of America, Inc., 1941.
     3 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FDA 9763
Performed by Lucky Millinder and his Orchestra with Sister Rosetta
Tharpe.  On reel with several other Soundies.

FRANCIS ALBERT SINATRA DOES HIS THING.
Copyright Collection
     Sinatra Enterprises/Bristol Productions, 1968.
     Director: Clark Jones; Producers/Writers: Saul Ilson, Ernest
     Chambers; Associate Producer: Bill Larsen; Editor: Armond
     Poitras.
     Telecast: CBS, November 28, 1968.
     28 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FDA 761
A television special of Frank Sinatra ("Angel Eyes," "Baubles,
Bangles and Beads," "Hello Young Lovers," "How Little We Know,"
""Lost in the Stars," "Nice and Easy," "Put Your Dreams Away" and
"Rainy Day Spot") performing his music with Diahann Carroll
("Amen," "the Lonesome Road," "the Music That Makes Me Dance,"
"Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen," "Sometimes I Feel Like a
Motherless Child," "Where Am I Going?") and the 5th Dimension
("It's a Great Life," "Stoned Soul Picnic" and "Sweet Blindness").

FRANK SINATRA--A MAN AND HIS MUSIC.
Copyright Collection
     Sinatra Enterprises, 1965.
     Director/Producer: Dwight Hemion; Associate Producer:
     Carolyn Raskin; Writers: Frank Peppiatt, John Aylesworth,
     Sheldon Keller.
     Telecast: NBC, November 24, 1965.
     57 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBG 7813
A television special of Sinatra performing "Angel Eyes," "Come Fly
with Me," "Don't Worry About Me," "Girl Next Door," "I Get a Kick
Out of You," "It Was a Very Good Year," "I've Got the World on a
String," "I've Got You Under My Skin," "The Lady is a Tramp," "Last
Night When We Were Young," "My Kind of Town," "Nancy," "Put Your
Dreams Away," "This Is All I Ask," "Witchcraft," "Without a Song,"
"You Make Me Feel So Young" and "Young at Heart," all recorded on
November 15-17, 1965.  

FRANK SINATRA IN JAPAN.
Copyirght Collection
     Bristol Productions, Inc., 1985.
     Director: Teppei Takagi; Executive Producer: Masafumi
     Watanabe; Producer: Danny O'Donovan; Editor: Bruce Motyer.
     72 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBH 6330
Taped live at the Budokan Hall in Tokyo, this concert video
features Sinatra performing "All or Nothing at All," "Come Rain or
Come Shine," "Fly Me to the Moon," "I Get a Kick Out of You," "I've
Got You Under My Skin," "L. A. Is My Lady," "The Lady Is a Tramp,"
"Mack the Knife," "My Kind of Town," "My Way," "New York, New
York," "One More for the Road," "Pennies from Heaven," "Someone to
Watch Over Me" and "Strangers in the Night."  Personnel: Don
Baldwin, Mark Barnett, Irv Cottler, Tony Garruso, Tony Mottola, Joe
Parullo, Bob Pierson and Bob Scannapieco.  

THE FRANK SINATRA SHOW.
     See THE DEFINITIVE SINATRA and/or THE GOLDEN CLASSICS OF
     JAZZ.  Sinatra and Friends.

FRIM FRAM SAUCE.
AFI/Myrick Collection
     Filmcraft Productions/Soundies Distributing Corp. of
     America, Inc., 1945.
     Director/Producer: William Forest Crouch.    
     3 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FCB 2738
Performed by Nat "King" Cole, with Oscar Moore and Johnny Miller
accompanying him on a Panoram screen in a cafe setting.  On reel
with several other Soundies.

FROM FOLK TO JAZZ AND POP.
     See ANATOMY OF POP.  The Music Explosion--Excerpts.

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Black Influence in the Recording Industry.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4324
Oscar Brown, Jr. visits a studio where Quincy Jones is producing a
new George Benson album.  Brown relates the history of recording
from the 1877 victrola.  The Twenties saw the rise of "race
records," any black music of the period.  Financial success was not
the usual result for Mamie Smith and Bessie Smith.  In the Sixties
and Seventies, new recording companies led by black artists like
Maurice White, Curtis Mayfield and Quincy Jones emerged to compete
with the larger, established firms.   During takes, George Benson,
Patti Austin and Paulino da Costa perform in the studio.  Between
takes, Brown talks with the artists, Jones and Bruce Swedien who
explain the process of making a record.  They also speak of their
experiences in the industry.  Finally, Benson performs a complete
run-through of "Love X Love."   

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Black Music in Theater and Film.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4334
Oscar Brown, Jr. mentions minstrelsy as the first American musical
theater and the only avenue open to black performers in its era. 
L.O. Sloane's Three Black and Three White Refined Jubilee Minstrels
perform "Come After Breakfast," "Everytime I Feel the Spirit,"
"Jump Jim Crow" and "Oh Dem Golden Slippers."  Sloane explains the
troupe's name and their refusal to use blackface.  Black theater
began in 1899 with The Creole Show, an early musical in a montage
featuring archival photographs.  W.E.B. DuBois attacked Hollywood
and Oscar Micheaux created an independent black cinema, since most
Hollywood films showed blacks in musical and social stereotypes. 
Today, prominent black musicians like Quincy Jones and Isaac Hayes
score Hollywood films.  Pearl Bailey discusses her career and calls
for a new system of apprenticeship where young black performers can
be exposed to the great artists of their time.  The program ends
with a photo survey of her career, as she sings "Before the Parade
Passes By."  Other numbers include "Black Balloons." 

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Blues--Country to City.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4330
Blues expressed the sorrows and joys of the freedmen during the
Civil War.  Guests Willie Dixon and his Chicago Blues All-Stars
perform "Hootchie Cootchie Man" and "Seventh Son."  Dixon and his
pianist, after an interview focusing on his life, indicate two
musical characteristics of blues: the difference in a blues vs. a
major scale, and the harmonic basis of an AAB blues form, presented
in a boogie-woogie bass.  The next segment stresses the lyrics of
Dixon and Robert Johnson, acknowledging the influence of Muddy
Waters on the Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton and Johnny Winter. 
Brownie McGhee and Sonny Terry provide an example of country blues
by performing "The Sun's Gonna Shine in My Back Door Someday." 
Blues' regional nature arises in a montage of film excerpts
accentuating Charley Patton of the Mississippi Delta, Blind Lemon
Jefferson of Texas, and discloses the contemporary sound of blues
in the work of Bobby Blue Bland, B.B. King, Otis Rush, Son Seals,
Koko Taylor and Junior Wells.

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Dance to the Music.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4327
Oscar Brown, Jr. explains that African traditional music provokes
bodily movement, a physical expression called dance.  The
similarities in movements of Afro-American social dances and
traditional African dance are rhythmic interest, use of
improvisations, and pelvic movement.  Although the movements have
been retained, their relationships to specific functions and social
activities have been lost.  The Rod Rodgers Dance Company performs
"Rhythm Ritual" to show the influence of traditional African dance
and "Need No Help" to the music of Valerie Simpson.  Influences
survive in the work of Alvin Ailey, Katherine Dunham and Pearl
Primus.   Next, the Juba dance and the ring shout, developed during
slavery, became famous once minstrelsy was rejuvenated by black
entertainers, which produced other dances: the buck and wing, the
coon strut and the cakewalk.  A montage traces the influence of
black dance and music on musical theatre, following which tapdancer
Honi Coles performs to Duke Ellington's "In a Mellowtone."  Coles
discusses tap's origins, in particular Harlem Tap, and then
concludes the program with a signature routine he calls "The
Exterminator."

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Early Jazz.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4329
Oscar Brown, Jr. cites the sources of early jazz: blues, brass band
music, African rituals and ragtime, the first completely notated
Afro-American music, all shown in a montage which include the banjo
and fiddle music of slavery, entertainments such as cakewalking and
marching bands, and a comparison between Souza's "Stars and Stripes
Forever" and Eubie Blake's ragged version, illustrating how the
march rhythm was kept in the left hand, while the melody was
syncopated in the right.  The stories of Tom Turpin and Scott
Joplin precede the similar funerals of Africa and New Orleans with
show brass bands.  An early New Orleans jazz combo comes to life
with the appearance of Alvin Alcorn and his Tuxedo Band performing
"Muskrat Ramble" and "Yellow Dog Blues."  The next segment treats
Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver and Louis Armstrong.  Roy Eldridge
joins in with "Sometimes I'm Happy" and "Kidney Stew with Lobster
Sauce."    

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Jazz Gets Blue.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4333
Oscar Brown, Jr. and Willie Dixon introduce the concept of the
basic blues form, which has produced the option of improvising from
the earliest jazz musicians on.  Next, Roy Eldridge talks about
blues feeling, and illustrates the difference between perfecting
techniques and communicating the emotions of blues through an
improvisation.  The fusion of blues and jazz came in Kansas City:
Count Basie and his Orchestra, Jimmy Rushing, and Billie Holiday
appear in excerpts.  Other blues singers appear as well: Ma Rainey,
Mamie Smith and Bessie Smith and their backup jazz combos.  New
interpretations of the blues appear in the works of Charlie Parker,
Thelonious Monk and Jackie McLean, who joins the set with a
jazz/blues improvisation called "Blues for Oscar Brown."  Includes
"All Blues."

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Jazz People.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4332
Filmed at Blues Alley in Washington, D.C., Oscar Brown, Jr.
introduces Dizzy Gillespie with James Moody, performing "Con Alma." 
They discuss bebop, going back to Louis Armstrong, Coleman Hawkins,
Charlie Parker and Lester Young.  Gillespie, accompanied by Ed
Cherry, closes with "Tanga."  Oscar explains that with the advent
of bebop, jazz musicians began to present their work as art. 
Innovation in the work of Coleman Hawkins, Fletcher Henderson, Don
Redman, Art Tatum and Lester Young forms the objective of the next
montage of excerpts, ending with a survey of the big bands of Count
Basie and Duke Ellington.  The diversity of styles generated in the
Fifties, from cool to hard bop to chamber jazz, meet the uniquely
personal approaches of Art Blakey, Thelonious Monk and Oscar
Peterson and encounter the Sixties' radical alternatives to
traditional jazz in the persons of the Art Ensemble of Chicago,
Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane and Cecil Taylor.  Back at Blues
Alley, Jackie McLean and his group perform "Minor March" and then
discuss the limitations of stylistic labels, before ending with
"Star Eyes."   

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Jazz Vocalists.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4331
Oscar Brown, Jr. discusses the possibly mythical origins of Louis
Armstrong's scat singing style, heard in "Heebie Jeebies" from
1926.  Basic nuances and styles of jazz singing star in a montage
featuring Billy Eckstine, Billie Holiday, Jimmy Rushing and Sarah
Vaughan.  Carmen McRae performs "I've the Feeling I've Been Here
Before" and "Bursting with the Dawn."  A brief film of a West
African work song illustrates improvisation and the African
approach to pitch and tonality, techniques used in jazz singing. 
Through improvisation jazz musicians have discovered a whole range
of expressive possibilities, such as the ability to evoke human
sounds through wind instruments, as shown by Duke Ellington. 
Vocalese, the practice of setting lyrics to the melody of an
established instrumental solo, is exemplified in the work of King
Pleasure.  Brown ends with his vocalese interpretation of "One Foot
in the Gutter."  Al Jarreau performs the scat vehicle "So Long
Girl" and discusses how he uses his voice to imitate instruments. 
McRae and Jarreau close with "Take Five."

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Rhythm and Blues.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4335
Host Oscar Brown, Jr. mentions the social and economic trends that
contributed to the development of rhythm and blues, before Bo
Diddley performs "I'm a Man," followed by a montage of rhythm and
blues pioneers: LaVern Baker, Chuck Berry and Fats Domino.  In an
interview Diddley reveals his life and tells how he got his
nickname, followed by a performance of his theme "Bo Diddley." 
Because R and B captured the spirit of assertiveness emerging in
the black community after World War II, the urgency of the rhythms
and dances, the emotional directness of the performers, and the new
range of dynamics made possible by amplification provided a new
mood of social and economic outlets for blacks.  The Dells
demonstrate that R and B can be plural, not just a solo form, with
"O What a Night."

FROM JUMPSTREET.  Soul.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4328
Oscar Brown, Jr. presents Stevie Wonder, whose work embodies a
contemporary expression of soul.  To trace the origins of soul,
elements of gospel entered the jazz of Ray Charles and Charles
Mingus.  Soul artists with roots in the church appear next: James
Brown, Sam Cooke and Aretha Franklin.  Next, a montage illustrates
how the music of Marvin Gaye, Gil Scott-Heron and Curtis Mayfield
reflect the social revolution and black cultural renaissance of the
Sixties.  Brown performs "Brown Baby" then discusses the evolution
of several black recording companies, such as Motown, each
providing its own variation of soul.  Stevie Wonder discusses his
career, sums up his philosophy, and closes the program with "You
Are the Sunshine of My Life." 

FROM JUMPSTREET.  The Source of Soul.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4326
Chuck Brown and the Soul Searchers perform "Bustin' Loose" to
demonstrate musical motivations from Africa.  He and host Oscar
Brown, Jr. compare the tonality of a blues-based melody with one
played on the African mbira.  Several examples emphasize the
presence of call and response patterns, retained in the music of
African-Americans.  Babatunde Olatunji and his drum ensemble
perform; the split screen reveals the polyrhythmic layering of
African drum patterns.  The drum may have been banned during
slavery because of its ability to "talk" and thereby to foment
rebellion.  Brown suggests that syncopation in swing and funk may
be an adaptation of African rhythmic patterns to European meters. 
Oscar performs "Bid `Em In" as a musical chronicle of black life. 


FROM JUMPSTREET.  Spirituals and Gospels.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBG 3802
Oscar Brown, Jr. performs "In Da Beginning" with the Mighty Clouds
of Joy.  The Reverend James Cleveland leads the D.C. Mass Choir and
the congregation of the Way of the Cross Chuch in renditions of "He
Shall Feed His Flock" and "Lord Help Me to Hold Out."  He then
discusses Aretha Franklin, Mahalia Jackson and Tommy Dorsey. 
Distinguishing spirituals from gospel as the music of the former
slaves, a montage traces their development to the journeys of the
Fisk Jubilee Singers in the late 1800s.  We next hear the music of
Harry T. Burleigh, Hall Johnson and J. Rosamond Johnson.  Clips
from Hallelujah (1929) and Green Pastures (1936) show the impact of
spirituals on film.  Gospel's ability to combine a religious
message with popular sounds delivers through the Mighty Clouds of
Joy, who lead the congregation in "If God Is Dead."  Leader Joe
Ligon discusses the impact of gospel on such performers as B.B.
King, Bobby Blue Bland, the Emotions, Marvin Gaye, Al Green, Bessie
Griffin, Mahalia Jackson, Sister Rosetta Tharpe and Jackie Wilson,
some of whom appear in excerpts.  

FROM JUMPSTREET.  West African Heritage.
Copyright Collection
     WETA, 1980.
     Director/Producer: Robert Kaiser.
     30 mins., color, 3/4" videocassette.                VBK 4325
Performing "Afro-Blue," Oscar Brown, Jr. contrasts traffic jams and
caravans, with reference to the ancient kingdoms of Africa's
"Golden Age."  Then the Wo'se Dance Theater performs the Lamba, a
dance for royal occasions in Mali and Senegal.  Oscar and Aidoo
Mamedi discuss his troupe and the African relationship between
dance and music.  He then illustrates both functionalism and the
oral tradition by teaching "Pattin' Jibba," a musical protest game
used during slavery.  Next a discussion of African griots
transmitting history and culture leads to one with Alhaji Bai Konte
and his son Dembo about the griot tradition and a demonstration of
the kora, a 21-stringed instrument.  The last segment draws
parallels between African independence and the civil rights
movement.  Hugh Masekela and his band perform "African Convention"
to show the influence black American music has had on modern
African music.  The last performance, "Ashiko," calls on all
African people to reunite.

FROM THEN TILL NOW.
     See BLACK MUSIC IN AMERICA.

FRONTLINE.
     See COMRADES.  All That Jazz.

THE FRUITS OF THE DEATH OF JAZZ.
     See THE CRY OF JAZZ.  

FUNZAPOPPIN'.
     See CRAZY HOUSE.

FUZZY WUZZY.
AFI/Myrick Collection
     Soundies Distributing Corp. of America, Inc., 1945.
     Director: John C. Graham; Producer: William Forest Crouch.  
     3 mins., black & white, 16mm.                       FBC 4368
Performed by Louis Jordan and his Tympany Five with Ruby Richards. 
On reel with several other Soundies.  SEE ALSO Jazz Classics.  No.
105.
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