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Topics in Chronicling America - The Election of 1888: Harrison vs. Cleveland

The information and sample article links below provide access to a sampling of articles from historic newspapers that can be found in the Chronicling America: American Historic Newspapers digital collection (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/). Use the Suggested Search Terms and Dates to explore this topic further in Chronicling America.
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Jump to: Sample Articles

Important Dates:

  • June 5-7, 1888. The Democratic National Convention is held in St. Louis, incumbent President Grover Cleveland is nominated by acclamation. Former senator Allen G. Thurman wins the nomination for Vice President.
  • June 19-25, 1888. The Republican National Convention is held in Chicago, former senator Benjamin Harrison wins the nomination on the eighth ballot. Levi P. Morton is chosen as his running mate.
  • September 13, 1888. British Ambassador Lord Lionel Sackville-West endorses President Cleveland in response to a letter from a purported “Charles F. Murchison.” This causes a scandal among voters with anti-British sentiments.
  • October 24, 1888. Republican National Convention treasurer W. W. Dudley writes a letter to Republican workers including instructions bribing voters in the state of Indiana.
  • November 6, 1888. Harrison is elected, becoming the third president to lose the popular vote but win the electoral vote.

Suggested Search Strategies:

  • [Try the following terms in combination, proximity, or as phrases using Search Pages in Chronicling America.] Harrison, Cleveland, Republican National Convention, Democratic National Convention, Allen G. Thurman, Levi P. Morton, Charles Murchison, Dudley, Sackville
  • It is important to use a specific date range if looking for articles for a particular event in order to narrow your results.

Sample Articles from Chronicling America:

  • "Again at the Front," The Washington Critic (Washington, DC), June 6, 1888 Page 1, Image 1, col. 3-8.
  • "The Second Day," The Salt Lake Herald (Salt Lake City, UT), June 7, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-6.
  • "Renominated!," The Evening Bulletin (Maysville, KY), June 7, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-5.
  • "They Waved the Red," Omaha Daily Bee (Omaha, NB), June 8, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-7.
  • "Harrison and Morton," New-York Tribune (New York, NY), June 26, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 5-6.
  • "At Last," The Daily Times (Richmond, VA), June 26, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-4.
  • "General Harrison," The Salt Lake Herald (Salt Lake City, UT), July 5, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-2.
  • "Levi P. Morton," The Evening Bulletin (Maysville, KY), June 27, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 2.
  • "The British Lion's Paw Thrust Into American Politics To Help Cleveland," New-York Tribune (New York, NY), November 4, 1888, Page 13, Image 13, col. 2-5.
  • "Sackville's Sack," The Salt Lake Herald (Salt Lake City, UT), October 30, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-2.
  • "The Party's Course," Los Angeles Daily Herald (Los Angeles, CA), November 4, 1888, page 12, Image 12, col. 1-2.
  • "Malodorous Dudley," St. Paul Daily Globe (Saint Paul, MN), November 1, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-2.
  • "That Ominous Letter," The Evening World (New York, NY), November 2, 1888, Sporting Edition, Page 1, Image 1, col. 5.
  • "Burchard Dudley," Lancaster Daily Intelligencer (Lancaster, PA), Novemeber 5, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1.
  • "Grover Must Go," The Evening Bulletin (Maysville, KY), November 9, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 2-5.
  • "We're Whipped," St. Paul Daily Globe (Saint Paul, MN), November 8, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 1-7.
  • "It Is Harrison," The Evening Post (Washington, DC), November 7, 1888, Page 1, Image 1, col. 2-5."
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  April 19, 2017
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