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Topics in Chronicling America - Galveston Flood of 1900

The “Night of Horrors,” September 8, 1900, begins as a 15-foot storm surge rolls across Galveston, Texas, killing over 8,000. Dawn breaks over a grisly scene of bodies in the streets. The Galveston flood is remembered even to this day as the deadliest natural disaster in the history of the United States. Read more about it!

The information and sample article links below provide access to a sampling of articles from historic newspapers that can be found in the Chronicling America: American Historic Newspapers digital collection (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/). Use the Suggested Search Terms and Dates to explore this topic further in Chronicling America.


Picture of Galveston after the flood

Jump to: Sample Articles

Important Dates:

  • September 8, 1900: The deadliest hurricane ever to strike the United States made landfall on the island city of Galveston, Texas.
  • September 9, 1900: Galveston is completely cut off from the outside due to the destruction of the bridges and the telegraph lines.
  • September 10, 1900: Rescuers arrived to find the city in ruins; thousands believed to be dead.
  • September 11, 1900: Famine, pestilence, and looting threaten the city.
  • September 13, 1900: Thousands of homeless take refuge in Houston.
  • September 14, 1900: All states send aid to Galveston.
  • September 16, 1900: Plans to rebuild Galveston are discussed.

Suggested Search Terms:

  • [Try the following terms in combination, proximity, or as phrases using Search Pages in Chronicling America.] Galveston flood.
  • Narrow the search to after September 8, 1900.

Sample Articles from Chronicling America:

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  February 9, 2013
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