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Topics in Chronicling America - Newsboys

“Extra, extra!!” In the 19th and 20th centuries, newspaper publishers relied on newspaperboys (“newsies”) to distribute their newspapers on city streets. The newsboys purchased their papers and usually had to sell all of them to make a decent profit. In 1899, with a sudden rise in the cost of newspapers, a contingent of New York City newsies staged a strike against big-time publishers like Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst. Read more about it!

The information and sample article links below provide access to a sampling of articles from historic newspapers that can be found in the Chronicling America: American Historic Newspapers digital collection (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/). Use the Suggested Search Terms and Dates to explore this topic further in Chronicling America.


Picture of a young newsboy.

Jump to: Sample Articles

Important Dates:

  • July 1899. Hundreds of New York City newsboys refuse to distribute the papers of Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst because of increased prices.
  • May 1902. "Mogy" Bernstein, the Western "King of the Newsies," establishes a home for Omaha newsboys.
  • August 16, 1904. Newsboys’ day is held at the St. Louis World’s Fair. Sellers from around the country arrive to attend the convention. With the leadership of John Guenkel, they formed the National Newsboys’ Association, which eventually evolved into the Boys Clubs and Girls Clubs we know today.

Suggested Search Strategies:

  • [Try the following terms in combination, proximity, or as phrases using Search Pages in Chronicling America.] newsie, newsy, newspaperboy, newsboy, carrier.

Sample Articles from Chronicling America:

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  October 22, 2013
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