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Primary Documents in American History

Missouri Compromise

Missouri territory formerly Louisiana.
Missouri territory formerly Louisiana.
Mathew Carey.
[S.l., 1814]
Geography and Map Division.

In an effort to preserve the balance of power in Congress between slave and free states, the Missouri Compromise was passed in 1820 admitting Missouri as a slave state and Maine as a free state. Furthermore, with the exception of Missouri, this law prohibited slavery in the Louisiana Territory north of the 36° 30´ latitude line. In 1854, the Missouri Compromise was repealed by the Kansas-Nebraska Act. Three years later the Missouri Compromise was declared unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in the Dred Scott decision, which ruled that Congress did not have the authority to prohibit slavery in the territories.

Library of Congress Web Site | External Web Sites | Selected Bibliography

American Memory Historical Collections

A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation

The Senate debated the admission of Maine and Missouri from February 8 through February 17, 1820. On February 16, the Senate agreed to unite the Maine and Missouri bills into one bill. The following day the Senate agreed to an amendment that prohibited slavery in the Louisiana Territory north of the 36° 30´ latitude line, except for Missouri, and then agreed to the final version of the bill by a vote of 24 to 20. After rejecting the Senate's version of the bill, the House of Representatives passed a bill on March 1, that admitted Missouri without slavery. On March 2, after a House-Senate conference agreed to the Senate's version, the House voted 90 to 87 to allow slavery in Missouri and then voted 134 to 42 to prohibit slavery in the Louisiana Territory north of the 36° 30´ latitude line.

Missouri’s application for admission into the union can be found in the American State Papers.

Search in the 16th Congress, 1st Session, for additional Congressional information related to the Missouri Compromise.

The Thomas Jefferson Papers at the Library of Congress

Thomas Jefferson expressed his opinion on the Missouri Compromise in a letter to John Holms dated April 22, 1820. Jefferson writes that the Missouri question, "like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror. I considered it at once as the knell of the Union."

In a letter to William Short from April 13, 1820, Jefferson wrote that the "Missouri question aroused and filled me with alarm...I have been among the most sanguine in believing that our Union would be of long duration. I now doubt it much." Search Jefferson's Papers to find additional letters discussing the Missouri Compromise.

America's Library

Jump Back in Time: Missouri Became the 24th State, August 10, 1821.

Exhibitions

Thomas Jefferson

This exhibition focuses on the legacy of Thomas Jefferson--founding father, farmer, architect, inventor, slaveholder, book collector, scholar, diplomat, and the third president of the United States. A section on the West contains another copy of the letter in which Jefferson writes that the Missouri question, "like a fire bell in the night, awakened and filled me with terror. I considered it at once as the knell of the Union."

Today in History

March 15, 1820

Maine became the twenty-third state on March 15, 1820.

August 10, 1821

Missouri entered the Union as the twenty-fourth state on August 10, 1821.

Link disclaimerExternal Web Sites

Our Documents, Missouri Compromise, National Archives and Records Administration

Selected Bibliography

Fehrenbacher, Don E. The South and Three Sectional Crises. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1980. [Catalog Record]

Forbes, Robert Pierce. The Missouri Compromise and Its Aftermath: Slavery & the Meaning of America. Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 2007. [Catalog Record]

Moore, Glover. The Missouri Controversy, 1819-1821. Gloucester, Mass.: P. Smith, 1967. [Catalog Record]

Shoemaker, Floyd Calvin. Missouri's Struggle for Statehood, 1804-1821. New York: Russell & Russell, 1969. [Catalog Record]

Younger Readers

Burgan, Michael. The Missouri Compromise. Minneapolis: Compass Point Books, 2006. [Catalog Record]

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  July 30, 2010
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