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Arizona State Guide

Arizona cow-boy
Arizona cow-boy / Frederic Remington.
1 print : lithograph, color.
New York : R. H. Russell, publisher, 1901.
Prints and Photographs Division.
Reproduction Number:
LC-USZC4-2361

Related Resources

American Folklife Center

Folklife in Your State: Arizona

Arizona's wealth of folk culture is well represented in the American Folklife Center. Among the Center's recordings are cylinders of Hopi music dating from the early 1890s, collected by Jesse Walter Fewkes. The Center's Arizona collections also include unique recordings of miners' songs, fiddle tunes, cowboy music and stories, and Mormon music and narrative. Arizona's Local Legacies Projects, an exploration of local traditions and celebrations, and a concert Webcast of Navajo dance and song also are available on the Center's Arizona Web page.

America's Library

America's Library is especially designed for elementary and middle school students.

Hispanic Division

The Guadalupe Hidalgo Treaty

In honor of the 150th anniversary of the treaty signing, the Library of Congress created an online presentation on the Guadalupe Hidalgo Treaty. It includes page images of the original treaty housed in the Library of Congress Manuscript Division and the area map used during the negotiations from the Geography and Map Division.

Historic Newspapers

Chronicling America

This site allows you to search and view newspaper pages from 1836-1922 from more than 20 states and the District of Columbia. Search this collection to find selected newspaper articles that mention events in Arizona.

Humanities and Social Sciences Division

Bibliographies and Guides

U.S. State Poets Laureate

This site provides the names of all current state poets laureate of the United States. It also includes a history of the laureateship in each state, as well the District of Columbia, and attempts to provide a comprehensive listing of all prior state poets laureate.

Law Library of Congress

Guide to Law Online

Guide to Law Online, prepared by the Law Library of Congress Public Services Division, is an annotated guide to online sources of information on government and law. It includes selected links to useful and reliable sites for legal information on U.S states and territories, including Arizona.

Prints and Photographs Division

Frank Lloyd Wright Buildings Recorded by the Historic American Buildings Survey

This list includes structures identified as the work of architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Search the online Historic American Buildings Survey / Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/HAER) records and consult the book The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright: A Complete Catalog by William Allin Storrer, 2nd ed., 1974. As additional documentation is digitized from the HABS/HAER collection, entries will be added. The list includes an image for Arizona.

Pictorial Americana: Selected Images from the Collections of the Library of Congress

The image lists includes prints and photographs relating to historical events to 1899; general subjects such as education, daily life, miners and mining; and views of U.S. locations (text and images). Images of Arizona are included in the guide.

Prints and Photographs Online Catalog (PPOC)

Search PPOC using the subject heading United States--Arizona to find digital images related to Arizona, such as prints, photographs, and political cartoons. Search in PPOC using the term Arizona or names of cities, towns, and sites to locate additional images.

Teachers Page

Features & Activities

Primary Sources by State

The Library of Congress has rich documents and artifacts from every state, the U.S. territories, and the District of Columbia. Click on Arizona to view historic artifacts and cultural materials from the state.

Lesson Plans

Creating a Primary Source Archive: All History Is Local

Examine the interplay between national, state, local, and personal history. Students produce a digital collection of primary sources from their family or local community based on the collections in American Memory.

Exploring Community Through Local History: Oral Stories, Landmarks and Traditions

Students explore the local history of the community in which they live through written and spoken stories; through landmarks such as buildings, parks, restaurants, or businesses; and through traditions such as food, festivals and other events of the community or of individual families.

Local History: Mapping My Spot

Students create their town’s history for coming generations and place themselves on the map in a literal as well as figurative sense, by producing portions of an updated version of an early twentieth century panoramic map from the American Memory collections.
 

Today in History

February 2

The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed in Mexico City on February 2, 1848, ending the Mexican War and extending the boundaries of the United States west to the Pacific Ocean. The terms of the agreement established the border between the U.S. and Mexico at the Rio Grande and the Gila River and granted the U.S. more than 525,000 square miles of former Mexican territory that includes present-day Arizona, California, western Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, and Utah.

February 24

Arizona, formerly part of the Territory of New Mexico, was organized as a separate territory on February 24, 1863.

February 26

On February 26, 1919, Congress passed An Act to Establish the Grand Canyon National Park in the State of Arizona.

December 21

On December 21, 1928, President Calvin Coolidge signed the Boulder Canyon Project Act intended to dam the 1,400-mile Colorado River and distribute its water for use in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. Hoover Dam, considered a wonder of civil engineering, was constructed in Black Canyon, on the Arizona-Nevada border.

December 30

James Gadsden, U.S. minister to Mexico, and General Antonio López de Santa Anna, president of Mexico, signed the Gadsden Purchase in Mexico City on December 30, 1853. The treaty settled the dispute over the exact location of the Mexican border west of El Paso, Texas, giving the U.S. claim to approximately 29,000 square miles of land in what is now southern New Mexico and Arizona, for the price of $10 million.

Veterans History Project

Veterans History Project Home Page

The Veterans History Project (VHP) collects and preserves the remembrances of American war veterans and civilian workers who supported them. Browse the database by state of residence to locate veterans from Arizona.

Virtual Programs and Services

Digital Reference Section Web Guides

Primary Documents in American History

This site offers a list of some of the most important documents in American history from 1763 to 1877. Each document has a page with background information, links to digital material associated with the documents, and bibliographies for both adult and young readers. This site includes a page on the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

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  October 1, 2014
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