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MADS User Guidelines (ver. 2.0) » MADS Elements and Attributes

MADS Elements and Attributes

Root Elements and Top Level Elements are described on individual pages, along with their subelements and attributes. A separate Alphabetical Index of MADS Elements and Subelements is also available. Attributes that are used by many of the MADS elements, i.e., authority, language, date, or linking attributes, are described below in the section Attributes Used Throughout the MADS Schema.

Root Elements

Root elements and their subelements are described on separate linked pages.

Top Level Core Elements

Each of the following main elements and their subelements are described on separate linked pages. The subelements of each of these major element are the same, although the attributes differ.

Other Top Level Elements

Each of the following "additional" metadata elements and their subelements are described on separate linked pages.

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Attributes Used Throughout the MADS Schema

Certain attributes may be applied to many of the MADS elements and have the same definitions wherever they are used. These attributes are described below.

Authority-Related Attributes

  • authority – This attribute is used to record the controlled list from which the element value is taken. Where an available list of controlled vocabularies relevant to a particular element exists, that information is conveyed in the "Guidelines for Use" section of the element.

    When there is more than one descriptor subelement under <authority>, the authority attribute should be used only with the highest level element to eliminate needless redundancy, e.g. on <name> rather than <namePart>.

    In general, authority records do not mix headings from different thesauri/authority files. However, if different thesauri are needed, the authority attribute may be included in <related> and <variant> as appropriate. [In MARC 21 authority record headings from different thesauri are usually recorded in the 7XX fields (Established Heading Linking Entry) and may be included in a conversion to MADS. See the MARC 21 Authority Format Mapping to MADS Schema version 2.0 for more information.]

  • authorityURI – This attribute is used to record a URI, if one exists, that uniquely identifies the controlled vocabulary identified in the authority attribute (and optionally referenced in the authorityURI), as assigned by the body responsible for the maintenance of the vocabulary. URIs identifying authorities may or may not resolve to human- or machine-readable information on the authority file, controlled vocabulary, or thesaurus.
  • Example:
    <authorityURI="http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects">
    <authorityURI="http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names">

  • valueURI – This attribute is used to record a URI, if one exists, that uniquely identifies the term or controlled value given in the element or subelement from within the controlled vocabulary identified in the authority attribute (and optimally referenced in the authorityURI), as assigned by the body responsible for the maintenance of the vocabulary. URIs identifying terms may or may not resolve to human- or machine-readable records for the term.

    Example:
    <valueURI="http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh86002064">[resolves]
    <valueURI="info:lc/authorities/sh86002064">[uniquely identifies but does not resolve]

Language-Related Attributes

  • lang – This attribute is used to specify the language used within individual elements, using the codes from ISO 639-2/b. This is applied to the language used as content of the metadata element. There is no MARC 21 equivalent for this attribute since language cannot be currently indicated at the element level.

    Example:
    <name type="personal">
    <namePart>Miṣrātī, Muḥammad Ḥamdān</namePart>
    <namePart type="date">1936-2004</namePart>
    </name>
  • xml:lang – In the XML standard, this attribute is used to specify the language used within individual elements, using the current Internet RFC specifications for identifying language. It refers to the language of the content of the metadata elements. There is no MARC 21 equivalent for this attribute since language cannot be currently indicated at the element level.

    Example:
    <titleInfo xml:lang="fr">
    <nonSort>L'</nonSort>
    <title>homme qui voulut être roi</title>
    </titleInfo>
  • script – This attribute specifies the script used within individual elements, using codes from ISO 15924, Code for the representation of names of scripts. There is no MARC 21 equivalent for this attribute.

    Example:
    <authority lang="ara" script="Arab">
    <name type="personal">
    <namePart>،ﺣﻤﺪﺍﻥ،ﻣﺤﻤﺪﺍﻟﻤﺼﺮﺍﺘﻲ</namePart>
    <namePart type="date">1936-2004</namePart>
    </name>
    </authority>
  • transliteration – This attribute specifies the transliteration technique used within individual elements. There is no standard list of transliteration schemes available, although one may be developed. There is no MARC 21 equivalent for this attribute.

    Example:
    <authority transliteration="ala-lc">
    <name type="personal" authority="naf" >
    <namePart>Prokudin-Gorskiĭ, Sergeĭ Mikhaĭlovich</namePart>
    <namePart type="date">1863-1944</namePart>
    <name>
    </authority>

Date Attributes

  • encoding – The following values are used with the encoding attribute:
    • w3cdtf – This value identifies dates following the W3C profile of ISO 8601, Date and Time Formats, that specifies the extended format for dates using the pattern: YYYY-MM-DD. If hours, minutes, and seconds are also needed the following pattern is used: YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss.

      Example:
      <recordCreationDate encoding="w3cdtf">2004-06-04T12:12:12</recordCreationDate>
    • iso8601 – This value identifies dates following the format in ISO 8601, which use the alternative described as "basic" (i.e., with minimum number of separators) rather than "extended" (i.e., with separators). This alternative specified in the standard uses the following date patterns: YYYY; YYYY-MM if only year and month given; YYYYMMDD if year, month, and day are included. (Hours, minutes, seconds may also be added: Thhmmss).

      Example:
      <recordChangeDate encoding="iso8601">20040604T121212</recordChangeDate>
    • edtf – This value is used for dates coded according to Extended Date/Time Format, which is consistent with ISO 8601 but extends it to express special forms of dates that are not covered by "w3cdtf" and "iso8601", such as open ended ranges.

      Example:
      <temporal encoding="edtf">1991-uu-uu</temporal>
    • temper – This value is used for dates coded according to Temporal Enumerated Ranges. TEMPER is a simple date and time syntax for representing points, lists, and ranges of timestamps.

      Example:
      <temporal encoding="temper">1860~-1872</temporal>
    • marc – This value identifies dates formatted according to the MARC 21 rules that are not used in other date encoding standards. In the case of MADS, it only applies to <recordCreationDate> (in <recordInfo>), when the date (YYMMDD) is brought in from MARC.

      Example:
      <recordCreationDate encoding="marc">990730</recordCreationDate>
  • point – If no point attribute is specified, the date is assumed to be a single date. The following values are used with the point attribute:
    • start – This value is used for the first date of a range (or a single date, if used).
    • end – This value is used for the end date of a range.

      Example:
      <temporal encoding="iso8601" point="start">1911-06</temporal>
      <temporal encoding="iso8601" point="end">1924-02</temporal>
  • qualifier – The following values are used with the qualifier attribute:
    • approximate – This value is used to identify a date that may not be exact, but is approximated, such as "ca. 1972".
    • inferred – This value is used to identify a date that has not been transcribed directly from a resource, such as "[not before 1852]".
    • questionable – This value is used to identify a questionable date for a resource, such as "1972?".

      Example:
      <temporal qualifier="approximate" point="start">1972</temporal>
      <temporal qualifier="inferred" point="start">1972</temporal>
      <temporal qualifier="questionable" point="start">1972</temporal>
  • keyDate – The following value is used with the keyDate attribute:
    • yes – This value is used so that a particular date may be distinguished for sorting purposes among several dates. Thus when sorting MADS records by date, for example, a date with keyDate="yes" would be the date to sort on. It should occur at most for only one date in a given record.

      Example:
      <temporal encoding="iso8601" keyDate="yes">2003</temporal>

Linking attributes

  • ID – This attribute is used to link internally and to reference an element from outside the instance.
  • xlink – This attribute is used for an external link. It is defined as xlink:simpleLink (see XML Linking Language), which in the XML schema specification has a further breakdown for different types of xlinks.

    Example:
    <name type="corporate" authority="naf" valueURI="http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n79006743.html">
    <namePart>North Atlantic Treaty Organization</namePart>
    </name>
    <url xlink:href="http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natolive/index.htm"/>

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Last Updated: April 23, 2012