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A perpetual calendar from 1859 to 1937

[Detail] A perpetual calendar from 1859 to 1937

Procedure | Evaluation

Procedure

Week 1

Brief Guide to the Library of Congress Internet Site

  1. Go to the American Memory home page.
  2. You can Browse Collections by Topic or use the search box at the top of the page. Try Browse first to get a sense of the overall scope of the collections.
  3. Next, look at More browse options to explore each of the media formats. Search (on each media format home page) to locate one item in each format, then print it along with its bibliographic information. For sound recordings and motion pictures, print the page with the bibliographic information.
    Photos and Prints - Find a photo of a city you know.
    Maps - Find a map of the same city.
    Books, Other Printed Texts - Find a document on the U. S. Congress or on work/economy (See if you can see the document image -many are available.)
    Motion Picture Collections - Find a film on work.
    Sound Recordings - Find a song or music recording.
  4. How would you cite these sources? Go to the Teachers Page and find How to Cite Electronic Sources for examples.

Useful Internet addresses:

  • Library of Congress - http://www.loc.gov
  • American Memory - http://memory.loc.gov/
  • List all collections - http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/browse/ListAll.php
  • Teachers Page - http://www.loc.gov/teachers
  • Citing Electronic Sources - http://www.loc.gov/teachers/usingprimarysources/citing.html

Core Historical Themes and Topics

Each group will address all six themes and all twelve topics within the decade chosen/assigned. The group will decide how to address all the themes by dividing up the themes and topics fairly, for example:

Theme #2: What have been the processes and consequences of migration for the peopling of the United States?
Sample Relevant topics: Race/ethnicity; Gender roles; Family; Socio-economic class.

Core Historical Themes

These themes will help to structure our investigations of U. S. history during 1890-1941. Please keep this sheet in your notebook because we will make reference to it often during our work together.

  1. How have diverse groups in the U. S. population participated in the institutions of democratic life?
  2. What have been the processes and consequences of migration for the peopling of the United States?
  3. How has the United States changed from an agrarian, rural society to an industrial, urban society?
  4. How have guarantees of fundamental human rights been expanded to include diverse groups within the United States?
  5. What have been the processes and consequences of the growth of capitalism as the dominant economic model in the United States?
  6. How has the United States emerged as a world power influencing global events, conflicts and trends?

Core Historical Topics

Select the topics that relate to your chosen or assigned theme. Not every topic relates to every theme.

  • Mass media
  • Religion
  • Work
  • Family
  • Race/ethnicity
  • Education
  • Socio-economic class
  • Entertainment
  • Political behavior
  • Health and medicine
  • Gender roles
  • Adults and children

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Week 2

Questions for Investigation

Essential Question: What patterns of change affected the lives of individuals and groups in the United States between 1890-1941?

I. State your Core Historical Theme:

II. Based upon this theme, what are three important questions that you want to investigate to understand this theme in relation to the essential question?

III. Relevant topics for searching/finding information about your questions:

Using the list of Core Topics, identify four which you believe will be helpful in locating information in American Memory and in other resources. Describe the types of sources you expect or hope to find using those topics.

Topic #1:________________________

Topic #2:________________________

Topic #3:________________________

Topic #4:________________________

Week 3

Requirements

Group Responsibility

  1. Develop a work plan for equitable sharing of group responsibilities and tasks.
  2. Create a presentation to share results of your research with the entire class.
  3. Identify essential findings about your research, and present them in a format of your choice during the presentation.
  4. Complete a final work product that represents the findings of your research. This is separate from the presentation, but can be used in the presentation. This work product must demonstrate that the group has used the sources in its annotated bibliography, with the proper citation format. (See Citing Electronic Sources for suggestions.) The segments of the work product completed by individuals within the group should be identified by the author’s name in the table of contents.

Individual Responsibility

  1. Complete an annotated bibliography with a minimum of 25 sources: 10 secondary sources; 15 primary sources (10 from American Memory).
  2. Complete your section of the final work product. Include documention for your sources in the final product.
  3. Complete Peer Review Forms for a minimum of 2 other work products in first draft form.
  4. Do a peer critique of each presentation as it occurs.
  5. Complete Making Sense of What We've Studied to develop understanding of change over time for each theme, based upon group presentations.

Mode of Expression Product Ideas

Discuss criteria for each possible mode of expression with the entire class or with small groups of students involved in each expression.

  • Multimedia presentation
  • Mass circulation magazine or newspaper
  • Family scrapbook
  • Series of letters or correspondence
  • Illustrated children's book
  • Historic mural/museum exhibition

From Concept to Completion

You've done quite a bit of work so far, and we still have a distance to travel to create your project. Now it's time to move towards your goal by developing ideas from your Questions for Investigation, Themes, and Topics into a manageable, achievable final product.

From Concept to Completion (PDF 28KB)

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Week 5

Preliminary Bibliography

Locate 10 secondary sources related to the theme, questions and topics you are investigating. Remember that a secondary source is not an eyewitness account of an event, person's life, or pattern of change. These sources must be different from others used by your research group.

Good places to start are:

  • specialized encyclopedias and dictionaries
  • journals and magazines
  • books about the era/time period you are studying
  • books about the specific topics you are emphasizing
  • online sources (historical web sites, archives of topical articles)
  • literature (novels, short stories, poetry, essays about the period/topics)

Week 6

Peer Review Form

Review/critique another project using the form below or another specified by your teacher. Do not review the project of someone in your group.

Project Reviewed:
Student's Name:

Highlights and interesting features Questions posed or concerns raised
Content: Content:
Design: Design:

Historical Biography - Resume

NAME:

RESIDENCE:

FAMILY MEMBERS:
Name:
Relationship:
Age:

OCCUPATION(S) AND WORK EXPERIENCE:
Dates:
Title and Responsibilities:
Location

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Dates:
School/Training/Apprenticeships:
Location:

LANGUAGE(S) SPOKEN AND/OR WRITTEN:

RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION(S):

OTHER AFFILIATION(S):
(political parties, unions, secret or fraternal societies, clubs):

HOBBIES/RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES:

Week 7

Strategy for Sharing

Develop a strategy for sharing your essential findings with other members of the class. Do this in collaboration with other members of your group.

For example:

  • Have a press conference where the editorial board of a magazine "introduces" their new magazine to the public and other journalists.
  • Stage a family reunion where the family "scrapbook" is displayed and discussed with others attending the event.
  • Have a "meeting of the minds" of important people from your decade. Have them discuss the major issues of the time, and respond to questions from the audience.

Sharing Strategy:

Essential Findings:
State 5 essential findings that emerged from research of your Questions for Investigation. State your findings as generalizations with broad significance, and avoid the repetition of minute facts or data.

Week 8

Making Sense of What We've Studied

Instructions: As you participate in this week's presentations, either as an audience member or a presenter, examine the results of our research over time. What long-term trends have emerged in response to each of the 6 thematic questions studied by our groups during the period from 1890 to 1941? Listen carefully to the presenters, ask them questions, clarify their comments for your understanding, discuss your observations with the class, and note your conclusions below.

Refer to the six thematic questions as each group makes its presentation:

  1. How have diverse groups in the U. S. population participated in the institutions of democratic life?
  2. What have been the causes, processes and consequences of migration for the peopling of the United States?
  3. How has the United States changed from an agrarian, rural society to an industrial urban society?
  4. How have guarantees of fundamental human rights been expanded to include diverse groups within the United States?
  5. What have been the causes, processes and consequences of the growth of capitalism as the dominant economic model in the United States?
  6. How has the United States emerged as a world power influencing global events, conflicts and trends?
Theme 1890-1899 1900-1909 1910-1919 1920-1929 1930-1941
1          
2          
3          
4          
5          
6          

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