Library of Congress

Teachers

The Library of Congress > Teachers > Classroom Materials > Lesson Plans > Segregation: From Jim Crow to Linda Brown

Back to Lesson Plans

extract from The Declaration of Independence - 'All men are created equal...'

[Detail] extract from The Declaration of Independence

Contributions to the Nation

Activity 1 - Progress of A People

Activity 2 - Research

Activity 3 - Synthesis of the 1953 Convention


Activity 1 - Progress of A People

Examine the following document, and then answer questions below. You may want to examine the full text as well as the excerpt.

  1. Was Booker T. Washington's speech better received by whites or blacks?
  2. When Washington said "make...both races one," did he mean integration? Explain.
  3. Explain the quote, "The opportunity to earn a dollar in a factory just now is worth infinitely more than the opportunity to spend a dollar in an opera house."
  4. Did Booker T. Washington favor immigrants over freed slaves? Why or why not?

Top

Activity 2 - Research

Keyword searches should use words that would be found in speeches and written documents. This often includes legal terms and professional names, for example, suffrage is used more often than voting. Below is a compilation of keywords you may find helpful in searching the American Memory collections and other materials.

  1. Jackie Robinson
  2. Tuskegee Airmen
  3. Harlem Renaissance
  4. Langston Hughes
  5. Zora Neale Hurston
  6. Joe Louis
  7. Louis Armstrong
  8. Ella Fitzgerald
  9. George Washington Carver
  10. Buffalo Soldiers (also see 9th and 10th Calvary)
  11. Benjamin O. Davis
  12. Mary McLeod Bethune
  13. Matthew Perry

African American Odyssey contains a wide array of important and rare books, government documents, manuscripts, maps, musical scores, plays, films, and recordings. See the Special Presentation, African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship for information on equal rights from the early national period to the twentieth century.

African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818-1907 presents a panoramic and eclectic review of African-American history and culture, from the early nineteenth through the early twentieth centuries. Among the authors represented are Frederick Douglass, Booker T. Washington, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Benjamin W. Arnett, Alexander Crummel, and Emanuel Love. Progress of a People is a Special Presentation of African American Perspectives, 1818-1907.

American Variety Stage: Vaudeville and Popular Entertainment, 1870-1920 is a multimedia anthology selected from various Library of Congress holdings. This collection illustrates the vibrant and diverse forms of popular entertainment, especially vaudeville, that thrived from 1870-1920.

Van Vechten Collection consists of 1,395 photographs taken by American photographer Carl Van Vechten (1880-1964) between 1932 and 1964. The bulk of the collection consists of portrait photographs of celebrities, including many figures from the Harlem Renaissance.

Jackie Robinson and Other Baseball Highlights, 1860s-1960s tells the story of Jackie Robinson and baseball in general. The Special Presentation, Baseball, the Color Line, and Jackie Robinson, 1860s-1960s, is a timeline that tells the story of the segregation and later integration of the sport.

Activity 3 - Synthesis of the 1953 Convention

Working in your expert groups, your next task is to plan a 1953 meeting to consider the status of the race at the middle of the twentieth century. Research the topic of your 1898 conference session, looking for more recent data on the topic for discussion at the 1953 meeting.

  1. Meet in your expert groups to examine the resources and information each of you located in your research.
  2. Next, your expert group will evaluate these resources to determine which two or three of them give a good overview of the topic and plan a short meeting session.
  3. For each resource identified, consider how it relates to your session topic, and whether it's a primary or a secondary source.

Top