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Colonial Settlement, 1600s-1763
Establishing the Georgia Colony, 1732-1750
Sir Robert Montgomery Calls for a New Colony South of Carolina, 1717

According to the preface to the pamphlet excerpted below, Montgomery's family and friends had been involved in planting colonies in the Western Hemisphere for over a century. How does Montgomery appear to draw on those experiences in his design for the Georgia colony? Specifically, how does the design deal with Indians, the settlers, and the organization of the settlement?

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Of the Motives, and Foundation of the Undertaking

Plantations of new Countries, say the Great Lord Bacon, are among the Primitive, and most Heroick Works of Man. They are meritorious in a double Sense; Religiously, as they illuminate the Souls of Heathens through the Darkness of their Ignorance, and Politically, as they strengthen the Dominion, which sends out the Colony, and wonderfully more than any other Means enrich the Undertakers.

But as such Attempts are Great, so also are they Dangerous. One early Caution easily secures their future Benefits; one little Error in Foundation overthrows the Building. It is to a Defect in setting out, that all our noble Colonies upon the Western Continent have ow'd their Disappointments; To a want of due Precaution in thier Forms of Settling, or rather, to their settling without any Form at all: The Planters grasp'd at an undue Extent of Land, exceeding their Capacity to manage, or defend: This scatter'd them to Distances unsafe, and solitary, so that, living in a Wilderness, incapable of mutual Aid, the necessary Artizans found no Encouaragement to dwell among them; Their Woods remain's unclear'd; their Fens undrain'd; The Air by that Means prov'd unhealthy, and the Roads impassable; For want of Towns, and Places of Defence, they suddenly became a Prey to all Invaders even the unformidable Indians took Advantage of the Oversight; and Carolina, is, at present, groaning under a most bloody Persecution, from a wild and despicable Kind of Enemy, who had not dar'd to think of the Attempt, but from an Observation daily made, how open and unguarded they might take the English.

From these examples, and the Neighbourhood of the intended Settlement to Carolina thus distress'd, our future Eden, made early wise by Dangers, which she feels not, would not only fix her Foot upon a firm Foundation, so as to resist a Storm Herself, but she wou'd also spread her Wings to a Capacity of Shadowing Others: A Brisih Colony, shou'd like the Roman, carry with it alwasy something of the Mother's Glory.

Excited therefore, by an earnest Inclination to establish such a Settlement, as may, by new Means, yield new Benefits, as well in Wealth, as Safety, and resolving to proceed upon a Scheme entirely different from any hitherto attempted, and which appears to promise great, and inexpressible Advantages. . . .

Of the Form propos'd in Settling

Our Meaning here relates to what immediate Measures will be taken, for Security against the Insults of the Natives, during the Infancy of our Affairs; To which End we shall not satisfie ourselves with building here and there a Fort, the fatal Practice of America, but so dispose the Habitations, and Divisions of Land, that not alone our Houses, but whatever we possess, will be enclos'd by Military Lines, impregnable against the Savages, and which will make our whole Plantation one continued Fortress.

It need not be suppos'd, that all the Lands will thus be fortified at once; The first Lines drawn will be in just Proportion to the Number of Men they enclose; As the Inhabitants encrease, New Lines will be made to enclose them also, so that all the People will be always safe within a well defended Line of Circumvallation.

The Reader will allow, it is not necessary, that these Retrenchments be of Bulk, like those of Europe; small Defence is strong against the poor unskilful Natives of America; They have accomplish'd all their bloody Mischiefs by Surprizes, and Incursions, but durst never think of a Defyance to Artillery.

The Massacres, and frequent Ruins, which have fallen upon some Engish Settlements for want of this one Caution, have sufficiently instructed us, that Strength, producing Safety, is the Point, which shou'd be chiefly wiegh'd in such Attempts as these. . . .

At the Arrival therefore of the first Men carried over, proper Officers shall mark, and cause to be entrench'd a Square of Land, in just Proportion to their Number; On the Outsides of this Square, within the little Bastions, or Redoubts of the Entrenchment, they raise light Timber Dwellings, cutting down the Trees, wich every where encompass them: The Officers are quartered with the Men, whom they command, and the Governour in Chief is plac'd exactly in the Center: By these means the labouring People (being so dispos'd, as to be always watchful of an Enemies Approach) are themelves within the Eye of those, set over them, and All together under Inspection of their Principal. . . .

The Men, thus employ'd, are such, as shall be hir'd in Great Britain or Ireland, well disciplin'd, arm'd, and carried over, on Condition to serve faithfully for such a Term of Years, as they before shall agree to; And, that no Man may be wtetched, in so happy a Country, at the Expiration of those Peoples Time; besides some other considerable, and unusual Incouragements, all such, among them, who shall marry in the Country, or come married thither, shall have a Right of layig claim to a certain Fee-Farm, or Quantity of Land, ready clear'd, together with a House built upon it, and a stock sufficient to improve, and cultivate it, which they shall enjoy, Rent, and Tax free, during Life, as a Reward for their Services; By which Means two very great Advantages must naturally follow; Poor labouring Men, so secur'd of a fix'd future Settlement, will be thereby induc'd to go thither more willingly; and act, when there, with double Dilligence, and Duty; And when their Time expires, possessing just Land enough to pass their Lives as Ease, and bring their Children up honestly, the Families they leave will prove a constant Seminary of sober Servants, of Both Sexes, for the Gentry of the Colony; whereby they will be under no necessity to use the Dangerous Help of Blackamoors, or Indians.
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