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Great Depression and World War II, 1929-1945
World War Two
Japanese American Internment

After the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans encountered strong hostility, prejudice, and discrimination. Fearing that Japan might next strike the West Coast of the United States and that Japanese Americans would "spy" for the enemy, Thousands of Japanese Americans living on the West coast were rounded up and confined to internment camps located inland. The following photos offer a view of what life was like for the Japanese Americans. In what ways do you think life changed for the Japanese Americans interned in the camps? How do you think those interned felt about the government of the United States? If you had been uprooted from your home and confined to a camp, how would you have felt?

Click on the photographs for larger images. For additional images on this topic, consult FSA/OWI Photographs, 1935-1945, Taking the Long View, 1851-1991 [panoramic photographs], and Ansel Adams's Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar. Use your browser's Back Button to return to this point.


Japanese Americans waiting for trains

Japanese Americans with Their Baggage..., California

reception center

Santa Anita Reception Center, California

Manzanar

War Relocation Center, Manzanar, California

internment camp

Japanese American Camp

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Click on the photographs for larger images. For additional images on this topic, consult FSA/OWI Photographs, 1935-1945 and Taking the Long View, 1851-1991 [panoramic photographs] and Ansel Adams's Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar.