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The New Nation
The United States Constitution
Order of Procession, . . . The Constitution of the United States

On July 4, 1788, a parade honoring the establishment of the Constitution of the United States was held in Philadelphia. In the following, a list of parade participants and order of procession is outlined (we have included only 15 out of more than 50 listed parade participants). Based on the list of participants, what messages were the parade organizers trying to send regarding the Constitution? Why do you think a parade was selected as one means to help honor the ratification of the Constitution? What kinds of parades are held in the United States today? What purposes do they serve?

View the entire document from which this excerpt came, from Continental Congress and Constitutional Convention, 1774-1789. Use your browser's Back Button to return to this point.


In honor of the establishment of the CONSTITUTION of the United States. . . .

I. AN Officer, with twelve Axe-men, in frocks and caps

II. The City Troop of Light-Horse, commanded by Colonel Miles.

III. INDEPENDENCE.

John Nixon, Esq; on horseback, bearing the staff and cap of Liberty---The words, "4th July, 1776," in gold letters, pendant from the staff.

IV.

Four Pieces of Artillery, with a detachment from the Train, commanded by Captains Morrell and Fisher.

V. ALLIANCE WITH FRANCE.

Thomas Fitzsimons, Esq; on horseback, carrying a flag, white ground, having three fleurs-de lys and thirteen stars in union, over the words "6th February, 1778," in gold letters.

VI.

Corps of Light-Infantry, commanded by Capt. Claypoole, from the 1st regiment.

VII. DEFINITIVE TREATY OF PEACE.

George Clymer, Esq; on horseback, carrying a staff, adorned with olive and laurel, the words "3d September, 1783," in gold letters, pendant from the staff.

VIII.

Col. John Shee, on horseback, carrying a flag, blue field, with a laurel and an olive wreath over the words--- "WASHINGTON, THE FRIEND OF HIS COUNTRY" ---in silver letters---the staff adorned with olive and laurel.

IX

The City Troop of Light Dragoons, commanded by Major W. Jackson.

X.

Richard Bache, Esq; on horseback, as a Herald, attended by a trumpet, proclaiming a New ra--- the words "NEW RA," in gold letters, pendant from the Herald's staff, and the following lines,

Peace o'er our land her olive wand extends,
And white rob'd Innocence from Heaven descends; The crimes and frauds of
Anarchy shall sail, Returning Justice lifts again her scale.

XI.

The Hon. Peter Muhlenberg, Esq; Vice-President of Pennsylvania, on horseback, carrying a flag, blue field emblazoned---the words, "17th September, 1787," in silver letters, on the flag.

Band of Music.

XIII.

The Honorable Chief-Justice M'Kean,

The Hon. Judge Atlee, The Hon. Judge Rush, (in their Robes of Office)

In an ornamented Car, drawn by six horses, bearing the CONSTITUTION, framed, fixed on a staff, crowned with the Cap of Liberty-----the words--- "THE PEOPLE," in gold letters, on the staff, immediately under the Constitution.

XIV.

Corps of Light-Infantry, commanded by Capt. Heysham, from the 3d regiment.

XV.

Ten Gentlemen, representing the States that have adopted the Fderal Constitution, viz.

1. Duncan Ingraham, Esq; .......... New-Hampshire,
2. Jonathan Williams, jun. Esq; .......... Massachusetts.
3. Jared Ingersoll, Esq; .......... Connecticut.
4. Hon. Chief Justice Brearley, .......... New-Jersey.
5. James Wilson, Esq; .......... Pennsylvania.
6. Col. Thomas Robinson, .......... Delaware.
7. Hon. J. E. Howard, Esq; .......... Maryland.
8. Col. Febiger, Virginia.
9. W. Ward Burrows, Esq; South-Carolina.
10. George Meade, Esq; .......... Georgia.

Bearing distinguishing flags and walking arm in arm, emblematic of Union. . . .


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View the entire document from which this excerpt came, from Continental Congress and Constitutional Convention, 1774-1789. Use your browser's Back Button to return to this point.