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Teachers TPS

The Library of Congress > Teachers > TPS Program > TPS Regional Grant Program

Overview

The TPS Regional program promotes the widespread, sustained and effective use of primary sources from the Library of Congress in K-12 classrooms by increasing access to the TPS program. Through this effort, hundreds of organizations from all 50 states, and the District of Columbia have enhanced their programming for educators.

School districts, universities, cultural institutions, library systems and other educational organizations may apply for grants of up to $20,000 to incorporate TPS materials and methods into their existing education and professional development programs for pre and in-service teachers, librarians, and other K-12 educators.

Grant recipients may use TPS funding to meet a variety of programmatic needs, including:

  • Delivering online or face-to-face TPS workshops
  • Embedding TPS materials and content into broader professional development programs
  • Revising undergraduate or graduate course syllabi or curricula to include a TPS focus

A 2017 evaluation of the TPS Regional program, conducted by Gallup, found that 83 percent of teachers who participated in professional development or academic courses funded through this program increased use of primary sources in their classrooms. Eighty-seven percent of respondents told colleagues about the primary sources and materials available on the Library of Congress Teachers Page.

Waynesburg University, Illinois State University and Metropolitan State University of Denver, administer grants on behalf of the Library of Congress in the East, Midwest and West. They accept proposals on a rolling basis throughout the year.

Examples of how awardees have used their TPS regional grants, include a Midwestern university that answered teachers’ calls for professional development focused on primary sources; a Massachusetts non-profit that used primary sources from the Library to support its mission to teach LGBTQ history; and a small national museum, in Montana, that directed teachers to a wealth of primary sources by combining its collections with the Library’s.

Read more:

History UnErased

Workshop participant examines a
primary source in a LGBTQ
history workshop funded by
a grant from the Eastern Region

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Bowling Green State
University

Teachers attend one of
four workshops sponsored
by a Midwest Regional grant

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Forest Service History Museum

Western Region facilitators
lead a workshop session
for teachers from seven states

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