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May 2016

Ecuador, physiography

Ecuador, physiography

Ecuador, administrative divisions

Ecuador, administrative divisions

Two earthquake events occurred in rapid succession within 35 km of Rosa Zarate, Ecuador on the 18th of May, 2016. The early morning earthquake (Magnitude 6.7) and the afternoon earthquake (M 6.8) are both part of the aftershock sequence from the April 16th, M 7.8 event near the city of Muisne. Since that mainshock one month ago, the region has experienced five aftershocks of M 6 or greater.

Historically, Ecuador formed part of the northern Inca Empire until the Spanish conquest in 1533. Quito became a seat of Spanish colonial government in 1563 and part of the Viceroyalty of New Granada in 1717. The provinces of the Viceroyalty - New Granada (Colombia), Venezuela, and Quito - gained their independence between 1819 and 1822 and formed a federation known as Gran Colombia. When Quito withdrew in 1830, the traditional name was changed in favor of the "Republic of the Equator." Between 1904 and 1942, Ecuador lost territories in a series of conflicts with its neighbors. Ecuador marked 30 years of civilian governance in 2004. In late 2008, voters approved a new constitution; general elections were held in February 2013, and voters reelected President Rafael Correa.

Ecuador is slightly smaller than Nevada, sharing borders with Colombia and Peru along the western coast of South America. Its climate is tropical along the coast, becoming cooler inland at higher elevations. The highest point in Ecuador is Chimborazo (6267 m), an inactive volcano in the Ecuadorian Andes. The natural resources of Ecuador include: petroleum, fish, and timber.

For more information about this and other earthquakes, visit the Earthquake Hazards Program at the US Geological Survey (USGS).

CIA World Factbook; USGS Earthquake Hazards Program; The Columbia Gazetteer, 5/2016; 5/2016; 5/2016

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