Press Contact: Helen Dalrymple (202) 707-1940

December 9, 1995
Revised January 22, 1996

Public Events at the Library of Congress - April-January 1996

January 3
Wednesday

DISCUSSION
The heroism and tragedy of two Warsaw uprisings during World War II will be recalled in a special program, "Two Uprisings in Warsaw: Retrospectives on 1943 and 1944," sponsored by the Library's Office of Scholarly Programs in collaboration with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Polish American Congress, the Polish Library of Washington, the American Center of Polish Culture and the National Capital Area Chapter of the Fulbright Association. Leokadia Silverstein, a participant in the 1943 Ghetto Uprising, and Colonel Andrzej Pomian, a leader of the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, will offer their personal reminiscences of the two events. The program will also include songs associated with the events, performed by Patricia Miller of George Washington University, as well as historical analysis and comment. It will be held in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, from noon to 2 p.m. Public Contact: Les Vogel, (202) 707-1673.

January 11
Thursday

EXHIBITION
Booker T. Washington was one of the nation's most powerful spokesmen on race relations at the turn of the century. Already widely known as the founding principal of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, Washington became nationally famous as a result of a speech he delivered at the Cotton States International Exposition in Atlanta, on Sept. 18, 1895. His most enduring remark, for which he was subsequently praised and condemned, was that "in all things that are purely social we can be as separate as the fingers yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress." The speech, which made headlines across the country, is revisited in this small exhibition of letters, photographs and documents from the Library's collections. It will remain on view in the Current Events Gallery, first floor of the Madison Building, until Feb. 29. Public Contact: (202) 707-8000.

January 22
Monday

SLIDE LECTURE
Jazz photographer and journalist William Gottlieb will present a slide lecture in connection with the exhibition of his photographs of jazz musicians, including such luminaries as Sarah Vaughan, Art Tatum, Duke Ellington, Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong and Billie Holiday, at the Performing Arts Library of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, from 6 to 7 p.m. The photographs were acquired by the Library of Congress in 1995 by the Ira & Leonore Gershwin Fund. Public Contact: (202) 707-3685.

January 23-24
Tuesday/Wednesday

CONCERTS
The Music Division continues its chamber music concert season with the acclaimed Juilliard String Quartet, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. The group will perform Mozart's Quartet in G major, K. 387, the Quartet No. 5 by Paul Hindemith, and Beethoven's Quartet in C sharp minor, Op. 131. The concerts will be held at the Terrace Theater of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. All Library concerts are free, but tickets will be required. Tickets for each concert, two per person, will be distributed 90 minutes before each concert begins in front of the Terrace Theater. Public Contact: (202) 707-5502.

January 26
Friday

DISCUSSION
The Library's Hispanic Cultural Society presents a "Tertulia," or roundtable discussion, on "Chile: History, Geography and Culture," with Dr. Patrick Jacobson. The program will be held in Dining Room A, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at noon. Public Contact: Karla Parodi, (202) 707-8921.

February 1
Thursday

LITERARY PROGRAM
Ishmael Reed and Garrett Hongo read from their poetry in a program sponsored by the Library's Poetry and Literature Center, Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, 6:45 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

February 13
Tuesday

LITERARY PROGRAM
The February Poetry at Noon program features love poems, with John Lee and Gregory Orr reading from their works in the Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, beginning at noon. Public Contact: Pat Gray, (202) 707-1308.

LECTURE
The second "Books & Beyond" program presented by the Library's Center for the Book features Edith Pavese and Judith Henry, authors of the recently published _The Millennium Book of Days._ The volume uses illustrations from the Library's collections to celebrate -- in commemorative notations and images -- events of the years 1000 to 2000. The program will be held in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at noon. Public Contact: Center for the Book, (202) 707-5221.

February 15
Thursday

LITERARY PROGRAM
Dean Young and Greg Glazner read their poems in a program sponsored by the Poetry and Literature Center, Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, 6:45 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

February 21
Wednesday

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
The Library's Hispanic Cultural Society presents a "Tertulia," or roundtable discussion, with James Brady, George Washington University, on "New Cave Discoveries in Honduras." The program will be held in the West Dining Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 11:30 a.m. Public Contact: Karla Parodi, (202) 707-8921.

February 29
Thursday

LITERARY PROGRAM
The Poetry and Literature Center presents C.K. Williams and Adam Zagajewski reading their poems in a program in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:45 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

March 6
Wednesday

CONCERT
The Library's chamber music season continues with a concert by the Beaux Arts Trio performing two premieres. Ida Kavafian and Menahem Pressler will give the first performance of "Romance," by Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. And for the premiere of William Bolcom's Second Piano Quartet for violin, clarinet, cello and piano, the trio will be joined by clarinettist Richard Stolpzman. Both works were commissioned by special funds in the Library of Congress. The concert will be held at the Terrace Theater of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts at 7:30 p.m. All Library concerts are free, but tickets will be required. Tickets for each concert, two per person, will be distributed 90 minutes before each concert begins in front of the Terrace Theater. Public Contact: (202) 707-5502.

March 7
Thursday

LECTURE
In the second public lecture on great books that shaped the western world, Martha Nussbaum, University of Chicago Law School, will speak on Plato's Republic. The event will be held in the West Dining Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 1 p.m. Public Contact:> (202) 707-4138.

March 12
Tuesday

LITERARY PROGRAM
The Poetry at Noon program features poems of humor and frivolity, with readings by Peter Klapper, Pickford Theater, third floor of the Madison Building, beginning at noon. Public Contact: Pat Gray, (202) 707-1308.

March 14
Thursday

LITERARY PROGRAM
Laura Mullen and Carol Snow read their poems in a program called "New Voices," sponsored by the Poetry and Literature Center, Montpelier Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, 6:45 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

March 21
Thursday

LECTURE
Bernard Bailyn, Harvard University, delivers a lecture on _The Federalist_ as part of the Library's series on great books that influenced the western world. The event will be held in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 11 a.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-4138.

March 27
Wednesday

LECTURE
Kevin Starr gives a public lecture in a program sponsored by the Library's Center for the Book, Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, 5:30 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5221.

March 28
Thursday

LITERARY PROGRAM
The Poetry and Literature Center presents Galway Kinnell and Sharon Olds reading their poems in the Montpelier Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, beginning at 6:45 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

April 9
Tuesday

LITERARY PROGRAM
In a special program co-sponsored with the Academy of American Poets, several eminent poets will read from their work in celebration of National Poetry Month. The Academy has joined with publishers, booksellers, literary organizations, libraries, educators and poets across the country to establish April as National Poetry Month, an annual celebration of poetry and its vital place in American culture. Details will be announced. The event will take place in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:45 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

April 11
Thursday

LITERARY PROGRAM
Carl Rakosi reads from his poetry in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:45 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

EXHIBITION
A major exhibition, "Dresden: Treasures from the Saxon State Library," opens in the Southwest Gallery and Pavilion of the Thomas Jefferson Building. Founded in the 13th century, Dresden was the seat of the Saxon monarchs beginning in the 15th century and played a pivotal role in the late Renaissance and the Protestant Reformation in Germany. The magnificent art treasures of Dresden were displayed in a National Gallery of Art exhibition in 1978; this exhibition focuses for the first time on the city's equally rich and valuable literary heritage. Examples of manuscripts, incunabula, books, music, photographs, maps and paintings -- demonstrating the full range of treasures in the Saxon State Library -- will be on view through July 13. Hours for the exhibition will be announced. Public Contact: (202) 707-8000.

April 15-20
Monday-Saturday

CONFERENCE
The Poetry and Literature Center sponsors a conference on "Watershed: Writers, Nature, and Community Values." Six days of readings, a lecture, workshops, panel discussions, classroom visits and performances at the Library of Congress. Participants will include poets, nature writers, environmental educators, musicians, earth artists and storytellers. This gathering, which will lead up to Earth Day, will celebrate the long-standing connection between American writers and the natural world and emphasize the importance of environmental education. Details will be announced. Public Contact: (202) 707-5394.

April 16
Tuesday

WORKSHOP
The Library will mark National Library Week with a special Preservation Awareness Workshop, which will be free and open to the public. Individuals will have a chance to learn more about preserving family documents and photographic treasures and how to care for and store fragile paper materials. The workshop will be held in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Public Contact: Amparo Torres, (202) 707-1026.

April 18
Thursday

LECTURE
Martin E. Marty, historian at the University of Chicago, will deliver the fourth annual Joanna Jackson Goldman lecture on religion in America. The Goldman Memorial Lecture Series is made possible by a gift from the estate of the late Eric F. Goldman to honor the memory of his wife. Each year an individual is selected on the basis of his or her high achievement and literary skill to deliver a lecture at the Library of Congress on a significant issue facing American democracy. This year's lecture will be held in the Mumford Room, sixth floor of the Madison Building, at 6:30 p.m. Public Contact: (202) 707-1673.

The Library of Congress occupies three buildings on Capitol Hill. The Thomas Jefferson Building is the original Library of Congress building; it is located at 10 First Street S.E. across First Street from the U.S. Capitol. The John Adams Building is directly behind the Jefferson Building to the east on Second Street S.E.; and the James Madison Memorial Building, at 101 Independence Ave. S.E., is just south of the Jefferson Building.

Interpreting services (American Sign Language, Contact Signing, Oral and Tactile) will be provided if requested five business days in advance of any public event. Call (202) 707-6362 TTY and voice to make a specific request. For other ADA accommodations contact the Disability Employment Program office at (202) 707-9948 TTY and (202) 707-7544 voice.

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PR 95-166
1/22/96
ISSN 0731-3527

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