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Northwest Pavilion

In each corner of this pavilion are relief sculptures by Bela Lyon Pratt (1867-1917). The sculptures represent Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter. Murals by William De Leftwich Dodge (1867-1935) ornament the walls and ceiling.

In the domed ceiling the artist has depicted Ambition, represented by the Unattainable Ideal, who holds the palm branch awarded for achievement and rides on a great winged horse. She is led by Fame, who holds the horse-s bridle and blows her trumpet in the direction of the chaotic group of strivers below them. Ambition is shown as the incentive for all human efforts, in art and science.

On the left a murderer topples a tripod and looks back at the body of a miser whom he has just slain. Three figures reach desperately toward Fame: a helmeted warrior, a sculptor bearing a statuette of the Venus de Milo, and a man being held back by a temptress. A blind poet is seated and on the far right a jester looks toward the viewer, rather than at Fame, as he holds a skull in one hand and a statuette of Victory in the other. He mocks the strivings of personal ambition in this life, knowing that real fame comes only after death. The wall murals below represent a related area of achievement: Literature, Music, Art, and Science.

Photography by Carol M. Highsmith.

Ambition

In the domed ceiling the artist has depicted Ambition, represented by the Unattainable Ideal, who holds the palm branch awarded for achievement and rides on a great winged horse. She is led by Fame, who holds the horse's bridle and blows her trumpet in the direction of the chaotic group of strivers below them. Ambition is shown as the incentive for all human efforts, in art and science.

On the left a murderer topples a tripod and looks back at the body of a miser whom he has just slain. Three figures reach desperately toward Fame: a helmeted warrior, a sculptor bearing a statuette of the Venus de Milo, and a man being held back by a temptress. A blind poet is seated and on the far right a jester looks toward the viewer, rather than at Fame, as he holds a skull in one hand and a statuette of Victory in the other. He mocks the strivings of personal ambition in this life, knowing that real fame comes only after death. The wall murals below represent a related area of achievement: Literature, Music, Art, and Science.

Science

Science depicts a varied group of male figures positioned before a great temple of science. At the center a winged female figure of Science descends from the heavens to crown the inventor of the phonograph, who kneels on the step before her with his invention. On the right a seated figure holds a model of a steamship and next to him a standing figure holds an early electric lighting device and beyond him, a man gathers wheat from the tines of a metal reaper. On the left a group of scientists, representing Physiology, Anatomy, and other medical sciences gather and discuss their theories around a table. On the far left a kite lying on the ground represents Benjamin Franklin's famous electrical experiments, and a figure at a campfire tends a heated kettle of water, representing James Watt's discovery of the power of steam. Below are names of ancient cities notable for their contributions to science: Babylon, Tyre, and Carthage.

Art

Art depicts a varied group of male and female figures representing the Arts of Sculpture, Painting, and Architecture. At the center a painter sketches a seated model while an instructor criticizes his work and to the right a seated young woman paints a Greek vase. Architecture is represented by a male figure holding a plan and by Ionic and Corinthian column capitals. A sculptor is shown with various attributes and famous examples of works of sculpture including a figure for the Parthenon and a winged Victory. Below are names of ancient cities notable for their contributions to art: Thebes, Athens, and Rhodes.

Art

Literature

Literature depicts a varied group of male and female figures sitting or standing. Apollo, the God of letters, sits in the foreground of a Greek temple surrounded by a company of maidens reading an ancient scroll. On the right, are Comedy and Tragedy. In the foreground a woman instructs two youths in the rudiments of learning. On the left a dreamy poet reclines and reads beside a bust of Homer while his muse hovers above him. Next to him a standing figure of Fame holds out a crown of laurel above the head of a seated poet who is deep in thought. Below are the names of countries notable for their contributions to literature: Greece, Italy, and England.

Music

Music depicts a varied group of male and female musicians sitting or standing. At the center Apollo is represented as the god of song and harmony, playing upon a lyre while sitting upon a long marble bench. Other figures, variously disposed throughout the panel, play a number of different musical instruments, illustrating the development of the art. Below are the names of cities notable for their contributions to music: Venice, Berlin, and Paris.

Autumn

In each corner of this pavilion are relief sculptures by Bela Lyon Pratt (1867-1917). The sculptures represent Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter.

Spring

In each corner of this pavilion are relief sculptures by Bela Lyon Pratt (1867-1917). The sculptures represent Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter.

Summer

In each corner of this pavilion are relief sculptures by Bela Lyon Pratt (1867-1917). The sculptures represent Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter.

Winter

In each corner of this pavilion are relief sculptures by Bela Lyon Pratt (1867-1917). The sculptures represent Spring, Summer, Autumn, and Winter.