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I Hear America Be-Boppin'

"Jazz on the Screen" is the newest feature in the "LC Presents: Music, Theater and Dance" Web site devoted to the nation's musical heritage.

Dizzy Gillespie (Sam Wright, left) and Charlie "Bird" Parker (Forest Whitaker) Duke Ellington (from left), Mort Sahl and Otto Preminger

This new searchable database documents the work of some 1,000 major jazz and blues figures in more than 14,000 cinema, television and video productions. David Meeker compiled the database as a result of research undertaken on and off over a period of some 40 years while he was employed by the British Film Institute and attending and working with international film festivals, film institutes and archives across Europe and the United States.

For example, if you want information about Clint Eastwood's 1988 film, "Bird," a biopic of Charlie Parker, type "bird" in the search box and click on the "main title" radio button and then "search."

The entry will tell you that Forest Whitaker played Parker, Diane Venora was Chan Parker and Samuel E. Wright played Dizzy Gillespie. You can also view an extensive listing of the music and musicians heard in the film.

Other "LC Presents: Music, Theater and Dance" presentations include Patriotic Melodies, the Katherine Dunham Collection and Civil War Sheet Music.

The site is a project of the Library's Music Division, whose Performing Arts Reading Room serves users in Washington and online.

A. Dizzy Gillespie (Sam Wright, left) and Charlie "Bird" Parker (Forest Whitaker) on stage performing in Los Angeles in "Bird," a Malpaso Production for Warner Bros. release. Reproduction information: Not available for reproduction.

B. Duke Ellington (from left), Mort Sahl and Otto Preminger working on "Anatomy of a Murder" (1959). Reproduction information: Not available for reproduction.