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Collection American Life Histories: Manuscripts from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936 to 1940

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  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 1 of [J. M. Brown]

    1 Folkstuff - Rangelore Phipps, Woody Rangelore Tarrant Co., Dist. 7 Page #1 FC [115?] J.M. Brown, 54, was born on his father's stock farm, which was located 12 Mi. N.E. of Ft. Worth, Texas. Brown was taught to ride a horse at an early age, and was employed by his father to take care of his stock when Brown was eight years old. ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 2 of [J. M. Brown]

    2 When dad went to the field to plow and I had to go to help, I'd ride on one of the mules. When dad went to town for supplies and wouldn't let ne take a hoss for myself, I'd ride one of the team. Many's the licking I caught for riding the yearlings on the place. Dad said I rode the fat off ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 3 of [J. M. Brown]

    3 want to break back to their home pastures. A stampede with just a few critters can cost quite a bit of money if they got hurt while stomping. Dad never lost, though, because the land was pretty level. Fenced too, but a fence doesn't mean a thing to a critter on the stomp. I've seen big stomps where the critters just run over ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 4 of [J. M. Brown]

    4 Good reson back of it, too, because you drove a cow away from it's regular feeding place, and made it mix with a bunch of other critters by main force. Every time she tried to go back home, you'd scare it back into the herd. Then, you'd have a thunder storm, or something else to scare it, and there wasn't no holding it ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 5 of [J. M. Brown]

    5 outfit. If too much fire water hadn't been taken on, usually the outcome would be a small sized rodeo. We'd all go to the pasture just North of the river, and ride the worst hosses we could find in Fort Worth. We could always find several bad hosses in town, because nearly everybody kept hosses and the worst hoss in the world, I ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 6 of [J. M. Brown]

    6 riders as he had to have. His system was to have a bronc buster partly break 'em as the hosses were caught, then drive 'em here to Fort Worth, have me finish the job, then drive 'em on to his market. You see, the handling between West Texas and here would make the busting easier, and take me less time. He made plenty ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 7 of [J. M. Brown]

    7 “The real work comes after the herd has been trapped. Then the hoss buster catches it. The men working with him, go into the corral or trap, and rope one of them. Then they'll bring it outside, or the busting will be done inside. Whenever it's done inside the corral, a man has to be kept on the watch that the other hosses ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11
  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    Page 8 of [J. M. Brown]

    8 herd on a good sized herd which was located right where the Fort Worth Stock Yards are located right now. It was in 1900, and Sansom Herald had 1500 head of ' CD ' cattle he was holding there. He hired me as an extra rider because they were having so much trouble. They were old starved steers, and they'd stampede every night. ...

    • Contributor: Phipps, Woody - Brown, J. M.
    • Date: 1941-02-11