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Collection The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America

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  • Audio Recording

    Boogie woogie

    • Contributor: Frazier, Calvin - Pittman, Sampson - Lomax, Alan
    • Date: 1938-11-01
  • Audio Recording

    Boogie-Woogie medley

    Performed by Albert Ammons. Recorded by Alan Lomax in 1938. sound recording | 1 disc. | 1938. (Date). John Hammond and Alan Lomax Recordings of Blues and Jazz Musicians. (Source). Recorded in New York by Alan Lomax. (Venue). Sound Recording (Form).

    • Contributor: Ammons, Albert - Lomax, Alan
  • Article

    Rockabilly - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections

    Rockabilly music arose after World War II and is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll. Mixtures of country music with swing and boogie woogie styles preceded it in the 1940s. As early as the 1930s, Western swing artists such as Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys and Milton Brown and his Musical Brownies freely mixed Black and white styles of music. ...

  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

    This is My Country

    Article. The co-authors of "This Is My Country" passed away within a month of each other. Raye died in Encino, California on January 29, 1985. Al Jacobs passed away on February 13, 1985 in Baltimore, Maryland. Their song "This is My Country" is played nightly during the finale of the Disneyland and Disney World fireworks spectacular.

    • Contributor: Library of Congress
    • Date: 2002
  • Article

    Rhythm and Blues - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections

    The term "rhythm and blues," often called "R&B," originated in the 1940s when it replaced "race music" as a general marketing term for all African American music, though it usually referred only to secular, not religious music. The term first appeared in commercial recording in 1948, when RCA Victor records began using "blues and rhythm" music as a descriptor for African American secular songs. ...

  • Manuscripts/Mixed Material

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  • Article

    Printable Timeline - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections

    1950 Songs of America Elinor Remick Warren writes "God Be In My Heart." Aaron Copland's first set of Old American Songs includes settings of "The Boatmen's Dance," "The Dodger," "Long Time Ago," "Simple Gifts," and "I Bought Me A Cat." Seeger Family Concert. Mike, Peggy, and Pete Seeger with the Short Sisters, recorded at the Library of Congress, March 16, 2007 [webcast]. Culture Gian ...

  • Article

    Songs of Immigration and Migration - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections

    As Europeans colonized North America, beginning with the Spanish and French in the 1500s and the British and Dutch in the early 1600s, colonists brought their cultural entertainments along with them. Songs brought to colonial America continued to be sung in their early forms, so that later scholars of songs and ballads, such as the British ethnomusicologist Cecil Sharp and American ballad scholar Francis ...

  • Book

    African American Song

    From rappers like André 3000 (1975–) and pop stars like Michael Jackson (1958–2009), to opera singers like Denyce Graves (1964–) and gospel artists like Yolanda Adams (1961–), African American vocal artists continue to shake up and shape the musical culture of the United States in profound ways.

  • Article

    Printable Timeline - The Library of Congress Celebrates the Songs of America - Digital Collections

    1900 Songs of America Amy Marcy Cheney Beach sets to music Three Browning Songs, including "Ah, Love, But a Day and "The Year's at the Spring." John Rosamond Johnson writes the anthem "Lift Every Voice and Sing" to lyrics by James Weldon Johnson. The King Family performs the traditional dance song "Cripple Creek" on string band instruments: banjo, mandolin, guitar, fiddle, and bass fiddle. ...